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  #1  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2007, 5:37 PM
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waterloowarrior waterloowarrior is offline
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Wateridge (Former CFB Rockcliffe Redevelopment) | U/C

Former CFB Rockcliffe Redevelopment - Proposed
The DND has recently turned this 310 acre parcel of land over to the Canada Lands Company, who have contracted architects to come up with a preliminary configuration for how the land will be appropriated. Design process scheduled for completion at year-end 2008.
Developer: Unknown
Location: South of Ottawa River, north of Montreal Rd., west of NRC, east of St. Laurent Blvd.
Web: http://www.clcrockcliffe.ca/
Rendering:



Rockcliffe Redevelopment latest concept plan..




The presentation is available at ftp://ftp.rockcliffe.astleygilbert.com/

username: rk-public
password: agr7825

public folder --- web concept file (english or french)


















Last edited by waterloowarrior; Mar 29, 2008 at 3:53 PM.
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  #2  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2007, 12:15 PM
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Hey all,

Ken Greenberg was here in Halifax last night to give a presentation for the annual Killam Lecture series. He featured his work in the Port Lands in Toronto as well as the Rockcliffe redevelopment. He showed some fascinating slides of the drawings that the team came up with while the proposal was still a work in progress, most of which were not shown at his public presentations in Ottawa over the past year.

I had to compliment him on the positive impact this project is having on the development discourse in Ottawa. Here's hoping the community develops according to his fantastic vision.
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  #3  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2007, 4:43 AM
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waterloowarrior waterloowarrior is offline
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looks like further delays

Quote:
Canada Lands pulls plug on huge Rockcliffe development


Maria Cook,
Ottawa Citizen


Published: Wednesday, November 28, 2007

The Crown corporation hoping to turn the former Canadian Forces Base Rockcliffe into the largest environmentally sustainable community in Canada has closed its office on the base because a native land claim has blocked the sale of the property indefinitely.

"It didn't make a lot of sense to continue operation of that office until the property was actually sold to us," said Gordon McIvor, spokesman for the Canada Lands Company.

"There are no indications whatsoever that it would be forthcoming any time in the near future."

The 135-hectare former airbase is part of an outstanding claim for most of Eastern Ontario by Ontario's Algonquins, who are in negotiations with the provincial and federal governments.

There are almost 900 claims filed by native communities across the country and they are a source of discontent. Every recent native land blockade from Oka to Gustafson Lake, B.C., and in Ontario at Ipperwash and Caledonia, is the result of an unresolved land claim.

After eight years on site, Canada Lands closed its office two weeks ago and terminated four employees. Two were transferred to other Canada Lands projects in Ottawa.

"We kept hoping that the sale by the Department of National Defence would occur year after year," said Mr. McIvor, adding that the average time for a federal land transfer is two or three years. "There were a lot of complexities we did not foresee."

Is the project dead? "Absolutely not," he said. "We're still totally committed. The project is not cancelled. It's delayed."

Robert Potts, the aboriginal claims negotiator leading the Algonquin bargaining team, said the group wants a stake in the development of the base. This could include profit-sharing, a piece of land or a joint development venture with Canada Lands.

"The project itself looked fabulous," he said. "It's just the question of what role do we play in it," he said.

Canada Lands, which disposes of vacant federal property, has been
developing plans for an environmentally sustainable community for 10,000 to 15,000 people.

The 12-year plan calls for a mix of 4,500 to 6,000 houses and apartments, as well as offices, research institutions, shops and parks. It features alternative energy sources and "green" design and construction.

Construction was supposed to start in late 2008, with the first residents moving in by 2009.

"It's really unfortunate that this project can't go ahead," said Jane Brammer, who heads a group of community associations monitoring the development.

"This was a chance to be ahead of the curve on sustainability," she said.

"The design was taking shape, the pictures were becoming more detailed, and now we're languishing. We've lost the momentum. There's a large chunk of land inside the greenbelt that is dormant."

So far, Canada Lands has prepared a concept plan, surveyed plant species, begun considering aspects of traffic, engineering and sustainability and held two public open houses.

"A fair amount was spent," said Mr. McIvor. "It wasn't exorbitant. None of that is lost. Ultimately we will be able to use that information."

Robert Howald, Canada Lands vice-president for real estate in the eastern region, sent a notice last week to the public advisory committee providing input on the project.

"Given that these negotiations may take some time to complete, we cannot continue to dedicate funds and resources to this redevelopment project when we do not have title to the property and there is no certainty when it will be received," he wrote.

"Canada Lands continues to believe that the redevelopment of the Rockcliffe site represents a significant opportunity to create a unique, pedestrian-friendly urban community in Ottawa."

Two years ago, the federal Treasury Board approved the sale of the land for $27 million to Canada Lands, which had been trying to buy it from the Defence Department since 1996.

However, last May, Canada Lands announced it would slow work on the project since it did not yet have title. A spokesman said the agency hoped that Rockcliffe could be negotiated separately from the overall native land claim and settled within months.

"It probably can't be negotiated separately," Mr. Potts said yesterday.
"We're still looking at this as part of an overall settlement package,
although there's nothing to prevent us from going forward with something shortly. We will likely be engaged in pretty serious discussions in the new year."

Mr. Potts said he didn't know how long it will take. "We're in the midst right now of putting together a proposal for the governments to ponder. We have committed ourselves to try to get an agreement in principle by 2010."

Last June, Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced an overhaul of the government's land claims process.

Starting in January, he said the government would dedicate $250 million a year toward land claim settlements and it would create an independent quasi-judicial tribunal to impose settlements on claims in which the government and native bands cannot agree.

"As part of the negotiations on the land claim, the government of Canada is working with the Algonquin on measures to address their interest in the Rockcliffe property while ensuring at the same time that the project proceeds in a timely fashion," a spokeswoman for the federal Department of Indian and Northern Affairs told the Citizen.

"The negotiators for Canada, Ontario and the Algonquin are hoping to conclude an interim agreement on consultation in the coming months."

It now takes more than a decade for most claims to be resolved, and the federal government estimates its land claim liabilities at about $15 billion.

The Algonquin claim covers an area of 3.5 million hectares (36,000 square kilometres), including most of Algonquin Park as well as the national capital region.

The claim was formally submitted to the Government of Canada in 1983 and the Government of Ontario in 1985 by the Algonquins of Golden Lake (now known as the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan).

The Ontario government accepted the claim for negotiations in 1991 and the Canadian government in 1992.

Negotiations collapsed in 2001. But in 2005, the Golden Lake Algonquins joined forces with nine other Ottawa- area Algonquin communities to elect a new negotiating team. In January 2006, Canada and Ontario agreed to restart negotiations.

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  #4  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2007, 1:59 PM
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Mille Sabords Mille Sabords is offline
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Good. Maybe now we can start from scratch and get a real New Urbanist plan for those lands, instead of the suburban yawnfest CLC was going to serve up. I was pumped about this until I saw the initial CLC proposal - little residential pods separated by little greenbelts, separated from the rest of the city by another greenbelt. Wrong wrong wrong. I want Garrison Woods here, and nothing less.
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Old Posted Nov 29, 2007, 3:31 PM
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Jamaican-Phoenix Jamaican-Phoenix is offline
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I don't know about that. Looking at some of the renderings adn their plans for the area, it doesn't seem that bad. Granted, it's not as good as it could be, but it's not horrible either...
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  #6  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2007, 3:41 PM
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eemy eemy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mille Sabords View Post
Good. Maybe now we can start from scratch and get a real New Urbanist plan for those lands, instead of the suburban yawnfest CLC was going to serve up. I was pumped about this until I saw the initial CLC proposal - little residential pods separated by little greenbelts, separated from the rest of the city by another greenbelt. Wrong wrong wrong. I want Garrison Woods here, and nothing less.
I dunno. The diagrams above look a lot better than any suburban development I've ever seen, and New Urbanist development too for that matter.
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  #7  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2009, 7:17 PM
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waterloowarrior waterloowarrior is offline
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aerial by southfacing (top right corner)

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  #8  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2009, 8:33 PM
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That'd be awesome, all of it...if they went through with a development that big...I like the fact that they want to include mid-rise and high rises in the plan included with all the smaller residential units. This would add a nice little skyline and density to the northeast end of the city...
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  #9  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2009, 9:46 PM
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Old Posted May 14, 2009, 2:57 AM
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Rockcliffe base to fully close July 31

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Rockcli...585/story.html
BY MARIA COOK, THE OTTAWA CITIZENMAY 13, 2009 10:33 PMBE THE FIRST TO POST A COMMENT


OTTAWA — As of July 31, the remaining military houses and buildings at the former Rockcliffe air base will be closed. No decision has been made yet regarding roads, OC Transpo routes and public access to the site.

A spokeswoman for the Department of National Defence said the decision was made to close the 135-hectare site in 2009 rather than 2011 as planned because of aging infrastructure and the cost of maintaining 430 houses — $1.8 million last year.

The Rockcliffe Driving Range and the Viscount Alexander Park Community Centre will also close.

The City of Ottawa has been renting 20 houses on the site as emergency shelters. Stephen Arbuckle, the city’s manager of social housing, said he expects tenants will receive offers for social housing units by the end of July.

The federal Canada Lands Company, which hopes to develop the site, will move its office elsewhere in Ottawa.

A native land claim blocked the sale of the former air base to CLC in 2007, delaying plans for a residential eco-district for up to 15,000 people.

A spokeswoman for the department of Indian and Native Affairs said negotiations are continuing, but the situation hasn’t changed much since 2007.

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen
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  #11  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 9:29 PM
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Development of prime, 330-acre piece of Ottawa real estate remains in limbo
http://www.thewhig.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=1581832
Posted By LAURA CZEKAJ, SUN MEDIA

Posted 10 hours ago

It's a prime piece of land aching to be developed.

The former bustling Canadian Forces Base Rockcliffe has come to exude a ghost town-like feel after the departure of military personnel over the past decade.

Of the 468 housing units on the base, 24 are currently occupied with 20 being used by the city as short-term transition housing for social housing tenants. There are also four buildings and several garages.

Most of the base's structures have been left alone to face the effects of time and weather.

Earlier this month, the Department of National Defence, which retains ownership of the property, announced it was closing the base for good. The remaining residents will be relocated as of July 31.

DND says the site will be secured to prevent security risks and property damage. Houses will be boarded up and utilities will be disconnected.

The decision to shutter the site two years ahead of schedule was made based on the deterioration of the buildings.

The 330-acre property is a rare development gem because it's one of the largest unused pieces of land within the Greenbelt.

The land remains a DND asset for the interim. The department plans to sell the property to the Canada Lands Company -- a Crown corporation that sells surplus federal property to the private sector -- with about 25 acres going to the National Capital Commission.

The transfer was put on hold in 2006 due to a Native land claim.

CLC spokesman Gordon McIver said the claim sidelined plans to turn the site into a "showcase" development that incorporates environmental and social sustainability elements.

Continued After Advertisement Below

Advertisement

Local resident and community advocate Jane Brammer calls the CLC's proposed residential development "visionary." She said residents are disappointed the plans were set aside.

A change of leadership at the CLC is why the project is in limbo, not the Native land claim, says Gianni. (Former CEO Jim Lynes championed the Rockcliffe project.)

The concern is that the longer the project is delayed, the more likely the CLC will sell the land to the highest bidder, he adds.

Article ID# 1581832
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  #12  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2009, 4:04 AM
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crazykittylady took a few shots of the old base, which just officially closed



Adieu CFB Rockcliffe
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Ad...627/story.html
The memories are piling up as the last residents pack up their belongings and prepare to leave their homes for good, reports Joanne Laucius.

BY JOANNE LAUCIUS, THE OTTAWA CITIZENJULY 31, 2009


OTTAWA — By Saturday, Shawn King will officially be the last man on the former Rockcliffe air base.

Today, without ceremony, the base is to officially close, with the last of 430 military homes save King’s tidy blue Cape Cod closed up. Soon, workers will swarm over the 135-hectare site, boarding up homes that haven’t already been shuttered due to vandalism.

“This was my life,” said King, surveying his garden and two vintage Bricklin cars he is restoring.

On Thursday, only a handful of residents were left, most of them putting their belongings into moving vans and setting garbage out on the curb.

A block away, Marcel Gerard stood on the cracked driveway of an almost identical Cape Cod, this one beige, with two lawn mowers and a barbecue ready to be moved to a house he and his wife, Camille, have purchased near Arnprior.

“It’s like a ghost town,” says Gerard, a military selection officer — he helps determine proper occupations and training for Canadian Forces personnel. “It’s peaceful, but creepy. All the sidewalks are still there, but there are trees growing out of them. You could shoot a good post-apocalyptic movie here. A zombie movie.”

Occasionally, a military police vehicle cruises down abandoned streets with names like Mars and Jupiter, Battle of Britain, Canuck and True North.

A crew armed with weed whippers clears the worst of the shaggy growth from overgrown lawns. One deep pothole is filled with cement blocks. King has posted a hand-lettered “dead end” sign at the top of his street, the improbably named Via Venus Private, because gawkers are ignoring the street sign.

What appears to be a cat suns itself on the porch of a pale blue house with weeds in the eaves-troughing. On closer inspection, it’s a groundhog that waddles away to a hole in the lawn.

“Nature doesn’t stand still for anybody,” observes Gerard, noting the groundhogs have become increasingly bold, taunting his dogs in their own backyard.

King, a former military communications operator and still a Department of National Defence employee, will live for the next month on Via Venus Private in the Cape Cod, one of hundreds of small, efficient homes built in the early 1950s to house military families.

King and his partner, Rick Frenette, had lived on the former CFB Rockcliffe for 11 years, but knew they would have to move. The former base was to become home to an ambitious redevelopment, a residential eco-district for up to 15,000 people. But plans were put on hold after a native land claim blocked the sale of the land in 2007.

The base was to close in 2011, but the Department of National Defence moved up the date because of the $1.8 million a year it was costing to heat the vacant houses and maintain the aging infrastructure.

There are no plans to keep people off the site after it is closed, says a Canadian Forces Support Unit spokeswoman, but the area will be patrolled by military police. Since 2003, the City of Ottawa had used 19 of the houses as emergency social housing. The last two families are moving this week, said a spokeswoman for the city.

Like Gerard and the last few remaining residents, King and Frenette had planned to move as well. But Frenette had a massive stroke about a month ago and died a few days later. Devastated, King asked the housing office for special permission to remain for an extra month.

“Rick made friends with everyone. Everyone from (the) housing came to the funeral,” he says.

So did King’s old military friends. “Even though we don’t wear the uniform, the camaraderie is still there,” he says.

King’s yard is home to the vintage Bricklins he and Frenette were restoring. The carcasses of more Bricklins — the gull-winged sports cars manufactured in New Brunswick in the mid-1970s — are in an eight-unit garage down the street being repaired by fellow Bricklin devotees.

Alarmed by two break-ins and increasing vandalism in the neighbourhood in recent years, King and Frenette acquired two Neapolitan mastiffs, Devin and Diesel. Devin, the larger of the two dogs at 180 pounds, dozed on the front porch during the interview.

King and his huge canine companions walk every evening to Frenette’s grave at the nearby National Military Cemetery at Beechwood, where he was buried as a military spouse.

When Gerard moved into his Cape Cod in 2003, the base was already winding down. The mass exodus began about two years ago, says Gerard, who liked living on the base for its big yards and solitude.

“We’re the last hangers-on,” he says.

Last week, a woman asked to see the inside of Gerard’s home, explaining that she first moved into the house as a three-year-old in 1952. Her family was the first to live in the house after it was built, she explained. Except for a few cosmetic changes, it was the same as it had been more than five decades ago.

“It was very emotional,” says Gerard.

“She was the first person, and I was the last

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen
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  #13  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2009, 1:48 PM
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I have driven through the area many times. It seems such a waste that the housing units on the base will now sit empty until the land claims issue is settled and development takes place. Something tells me it might be a long wait.

I wonder if anyone more familiar with the Canada Lands development proposal knows what the plan entails for Hemlock? It seems not to be mentioned much but major development on this site would seem to imply a widening of Hemlock/Beechwood into a four lane arterial road, as it would be the most direct link to the downtown (along with Montreal Rd) - I imagine that Manor Park (not to mention Rockcliffe and New Edinburgh) would have a major fit over such a prospect, given their hyper-ventilation over a possible Kettle Island bridge. Would I be wrong to anticipate an eventual battle royal between the city and three very powerful community associations?
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Old Posted Oct 22, 2010, 10:27 AM
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Decision pending on former Rockcliffe air base
 http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/De...623/story.html
Talks result in ‘great news’ for First Nations
 
BY KATHERINE DUNN, THE OTTAWA CITIZEN OCTOBER 22, 2010 COMMENTS

Canadian Forces Base Rockcliffe, once slated to become Canada’s first eco-neighbourhood, may finally see new life.

Negotiations over a land claim between the Algonquins of Eastern Ontario and the federal government, which delayed the sale of the deserted air base for more than four years, have finally ended, according to the Algonquins’ lawyer.

“I can’t get into the details,” said Robert Potts, who led the negotiating team. However, he said the agreement that will give the First Nations people a say in the land’s development is “great news.”

The decision was made in September, he said, but has not been formally released.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development said the new agreement is a memorandum of understanding that the federal government will eventually “provide the Algonquins with funds to enable them to participate in the redevelopment of the site with the Canada Lands Company.” That’s the Crown corporation that disposes of surplus federal property and was set to buy the land in 2005 from the Department of National Defence.

Geneviève Guibert wrote in an e-mail that the memorandum is only part of a larger settlement package for the Algonquin land claim that hasn’t been finalized. Potts said he hopes that will be squared away in the next 18 months or so.

Canada Lands Co. has long been the heir apparent for development of the base, prime real estate only 51ž2 kilometres from Parliament Hill.

In 2005, the Treasury Board gave DND the go-ahead to sell the land for $27 million. Canada Lands began the design for what it hoped would be a new kind of community.

Rockcliffe Landing was to be home for between 12,000 and 15,000 people, dwarfing many of its neighbours, including Rockcliffe Park and Vanier. A mix of businesses and homes, it was intended to be a magnet for green building and sustainable design. Architects and urban planners were hired from across the country to design the community.

A year after the sale was approved, the transfer stalled when 10 Algonquin groups made a land claim covering 36,000 square kilometres around the capital region, including the air base.

A land claim is an assertion that native land was taken without a formal treaty, or under a treaty whose conditions the government didn’t honour. It is the federal government’s policy to not sell any property it owns that is covered by such a claim.

In 2007, while negotiations continued, Canada Lands’ offices at the base were shut down. In 2009, the last residents of the defunct base moved out. The roads into the base have since been blocked off.

Ottawa-Vanier MP Mauril Bélanger said DND has commissioned a company to tear down the last of the buildings.

“(Canada Lands) had ceased all the operations because the land was not forthcoming,” Bélanger said.

No one knew when work on the site would begin again.

The new agreement could refresh Canada Lands’ ambitious plans. Potts and Bélanger say the sale is expected within 18 months. But even when the sale is made, the construction plan won’t be simple.

“Architecturally and construction-wise it could be built in one, two, three years; it doesn’t take long to build,” said John Cook, a partner with Ottawa’s GRC Architects. “It’s really building them and selling (the buildings) … I suspect it’s going to be a 10- to 15-year process.”

Both Bélanger and Rideau-Rockcliffe Councillor Jacques Legendre caution that a community does not just appear once housing is built.

“That’s a town the size of Hawkesbury,” said Legendre. “Hawkesbury does not have just bedrooms.”

But support for a well-designed, sustainable community largely had support from the surrounding neighbourhoods.

“I’d never seen an example of significant redevelopment … being proposed with so much community acceptance,” the councillor said.

Hopes for a new project continue, despite the changes the years have brought.

“It was moving forward in an absolutely fantastic way,” said Legendre.

With files from Maria Cook

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen
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  #15  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2010, 11:10 AM
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Jamaican-Phoenix Jamaican-Phoenix is offline
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I really hope it becomes a high-density eco-neighbourhood that has some nice architecture and features.
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Old Posted Oct 22, 2010, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Jamaican-Phoenix View Post
I really hope it becomes a high-density eco-neighbourhood that has some nice architecture and features.
Do you think that is likely.
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  #17  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2010, 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reidjr View Post
Do you think that is likely.
It could end up as Hawkesbury

http://goo.gl/maps/EOJb
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  #18  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2010, 2:29 PM
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Jamaican-Phoenix Jamaican-Phoenix is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reidjr View Post
Do you think that is likely.
In this town? Not really...
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  #19  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2010, 7:07 PM
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Why not just re-zone it industrial or institutional and consolidate some of the federal government offices currently in bad locations there? Make it the Tunney's Pasture of the east end.

The biggest downside is the lack of rapid transit there (and little potential for such, unless a service were to be implemented along a future interprovincial bridge there).
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Old Posted Oct 23, 2010, 4:09 AM
Uhuniau Uhuniau is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eternallyme View Post
Why not just re-zone it industrial or institutional and consolidate some of the federal government offices currently in bad locations there? Make it the Tunney's Pasture of the east end.

The biggest downside is the lack of rapid transit there (and little potential for such, unless a service were to be implemented along a future interprovincial bridge there).
Well, the soopergeniuses did approve a study of a Montreal Road corridor before the canned it.

They also then came up with the brilliant idea of dropping 15% of the runs on Route 12, and replacing most of the artics with 40-footers.
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