HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum.

Since 1999, SkyscraperPage.com's forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web.  The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics.  SkyscraperPage.com also features unique skyscraper diagrams, a database of construction activity, and publishes popular skyscraper posters.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Photography Forums > Found City Photos

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2011, 6:47 AM
Urbanguy's Avatar
Urbanguy Urbanguy is offline
Go Beavs! Go Niners!
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Portland | Honolulu
Posts: 5,839
Historic Honolulu - A comprehensive journey back in time

Let's take a journey back in time & explore Honolulu as it was before many wonderful buildings were destroyed & hundreds of ugly buildings replaced them!

Historic Honolulu

Photo Essay: Everyday Life in 20th Century Honolulu
Everyday Life in 20th Century Honolulu by Tiffany Hill, Michael Keany and A. Kam Napier on Honolulu Magazine


Salute! Sailors cross King Street as trolley cars and Model T’s zoom by in this 1925 photo. Flags line the street in honor of the U.S. Navy fleet’s arrival in Honolulu.
photo: bishop museum


Honolulu Iron Works workers, and their bosses pose in the undated photo above. As the sugar plantations thrived, so too did David Weston’s machine shop, which began producing the hardware of the sugar mills. His invention of the suspended centrifuge for drying sugar revolutionized the industry. By the early 1900s the Iron Works was making complete sugar “factories” for Hawaii’s Big Five sugar planters as well as for factories in Puerto Rico, Cuba, Mexico, the Philippines and in Louisiana.
After decades of unstoppable success, in the 1950s Honolulu Iron Works began to feel the effects of the changing industry. The company faced stiff competition on the Mainland and many plantations were making and repairing their own parts. In 1973, Honolulu Iron Works shut its doors for good.
photo: state archives


Going to the Market: The first people of Chinese ancestry arrived in Hawaii in 1788. The community remained small until 1852, when the first Chinese contract laborers arrived. By 1900, around the time this photo was taken, almost 26,000 Chinese people called Hawaii home. While most were plantation laborers, some residents opened restaurants, apothecaries, launderettes and markets, like the men pictured above.
photo: state archives


In its early issues, Paradise of the Pacific, predecessor of HONOLULU Magazine, every month listed “Facts about Honolulu,” listing the city’s population, attractions and businesses. It also listed things that didn’t exist in Hawaii, “such as no venomous reptiles, no cyclones, no virulence in epidemic diseases, which are generally serious elsewhere,” and more.
Photo: state archives


Dining out in 1913: The staff prepares the dining room of the Alexander Young Café on Hotel and Bishop streets. The café was part of the 300-room Alexander Young Hotel, its namesake a prominent Honolulu businessman. Young opened the hotel in 1903 and would later buy the original Royal Hawaiian Hotel at Richards and Hotel streets and the Moana Hotel in Waikiki.
photo: l.e. edgeworth / bishop museum


Fresh Catch: Men pose alongside their catch in a local fish market. “The fishing day for the tuna fleet start at about 4 a.m.,” notes Paradise of the Pacific. “Tuna boats with a good day usually bring in from 5,000 to 15,000 pounds each day.”
Photo: bishop museum / keystone view company


Coming to Hawaii in 1913: Chinese men gather around eating bowls of rice aboard the steamer Sierra en route to Hawaii. The men were most likely contract laborers brought over to work in the plantations. This image was originally printed on a postcard.
Photo: state archives


Hands on Learning: Children learn to sew in a Waipahu classroom in this 1914 photo. Education during this era emphasized manual skills, such as sewing, carpentry and printing.
Photo: bishop museum


In the early 1900s, large, freestanding billboards dotted Oahu’s downtown landscape. Many advertised cigarettes, bars and plays. Some were political, such as the Hawaiian-language one above promoting a Territorial Legislative candidate. Some residents actively protested billboard advertisements, especially Outdoor Circle members.
Photo: state archives


Desk jockeys: Honolulu businessmen and their secretary take a break from work to pose for this 1920s photo. By then, telephones, typewriters and mechanical adding machines were commonplace in Island offices.
Photo: Bishop Museum


In October 1899, Henry Baldwin and Edward Tenney became the first Honoluluans to drive automobiles in the Islands, cruising down King and Punahou streets. The papers described the two vehicles as Wood electrics. By 1914, there were 1,782 registered car owners. That same year, townies could get to Bijou Theatre by riding in a Model T Ford from the Honolulu Taxicab Company. The fare was $.15 to $.75 ($3.40 and $16.99 in today’s dollars).
The first traffic light was installed in 1936, at Nuuanu Avenue and Beretania Street. By then some laws were already in place, such as requiring lights after dusk, vehicle taxes and a four-mile-per-hour speed limit over bridges.
Photo: State archives


Open Wide: If you had a toothache in 1935, you could get dental work done at Palama Settlement. The settlement first began providing care and social services to Oahu residents in 1896. By then Western dentistry was well established in Hawaii. Dr. Mott Smith, Hawaii’s first professional dentist opened his office in 1851.
photo: state archives


To Serve and Protect: Dozens of boys, part of the Honolulu Police Department’s Junior Police Officers, parade down a Honolulu street in the 1920s.
photo: state archives


Local Filipino men celebrate their home country’s independence in 1934 with a patriotic float at the Iolani Palace grounds. More than 63,000 Filipinos lived in the Islands in the early 1930s.
photo: state archives


Social Hot Spot: In 1937, Benson Smith Drug Store, on King and Fort streets, was a mainstay in Honolulu, not only for its pharmacy, its supply of toiletries, candy and perfumes, but also for its soda fountain. It was a popular meet-up spot for the town’s socialites.
photos: bishop museum


Good Eats: P.Y. Chong (left), his son (in the car) and four unidentified women pose with Chong's new LaSalle in front of his legendary Waikiki restaurant, Lau Yee Chai, in 1937.


Traveling to Hawaii from the West Coast in the 1930s used to be a five-day journey, with wealthy passengers pampered along the way with gourmet food, drinks and services. Matson’s luxury liners epitomized the era’s preferred travel mode of transportation.
The first successful air flight from Oakland to Wheeler Air Field took place in 1927. That same year, the John Rodgers Airport opened, later renamed the Honolulu International Airport. Inter-Island Airways (now Hawaiian Airlines), the Islands’ first local airlines, began operating in 1929, using two Sikorsky seven-passenger planes and a Bellanca monoplane.
It was the arrival of regular jet service between Hawaii and the Mainland in 1959 that jump-started decades of growth and prosperity in the Islands. The flood of new travelers to Hawaii sparked a surge of development in Waikiki. Almost 10 years later, Matson’s Lurline took its last voyage. Hawaii was no longer the exclusive destination of the wealthy.
(Above) Fifteen hours after departing from San Francisco, 25 passengers on the 1939 inaugural flight of Boeing’s California Clipper arrive in Honolulu.
photo: state archives


Hal Wilcox (left) and Harvey Dukelow (right) silk-screen fabric at Hawaiian Hand Prints in 1949. Aloha prints took the town by storm, on shirts and upholstery.
photo: ray j. baker/ bishop museum


Touchdown: Four UH Rainbows football players talk strategy in their huddle in this 1946 photo. The Rainbows, which were first founded by the College of Hawaii in 1909, played in the 24,000-seat Honolulu Stadium in Moiliili.
photo: honolulu magazine archives


Watermen: The men of the Healani Boat Club gather for a group shot. The club formed in 1890 and was the only active rowing club during World War II. In 1950, the club became a member of Hawaiian Canoe Surfing and Racing Association, along with the Outrigger Canoe Club, Waikiki Surf Club and Hui Nalu Canoe Club.
Photos: state archives


Plantation Work: Filipino laborers at work in the sugar plantations circa 1950. The men rolled down furrows on modern agriculture machinery. Training programs enabled them to learn new skills, which earned them the highest year-round agricultural wage in the world.

|=========================|

From the Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Merchant street looking toward Waikiki. Kamehameha V Post Office in left foreground, then Honolulu Hale and P.C.A. Printing shop. Schaefer & Co. on right, then Bishop Bank.
Date: c1885
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


King Street looking toward Fort Street with streetcar in the background.
Date: c1910
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Corner Fort and King Streets. Sun Pearl Photograph Gallery and J.T. Waterhouse buildings visible.
Date: c1879
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Japanese contract laborers landing from the S.S. Miike Maru at Honolulu Harbor.
Date: 1893
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Japanese immigrants landing at Honolulu Harbor.
Date: 1893
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Exterior view of the U.S. Immigration Station in Honolulu.
Date: c1905
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections



Hawaiian Hotel on Richards Street, Honolulu.
Date: c1890
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Theo H. Davies building at the corner of Merchant and Bishop Streets looking toward the ocean.
Date: c1920
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Hotel Street in Honolulu, Hawaii.
Date: Unknown
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Fashion Stables at the corner of Hotel and Fort Streets, Honolulu.
Date: c1880
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Policeman directing traffic on Fort Street from Hotel Street in Honolulu.
Date: c1919
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Group of people in front of McCabe, Hamilton & Renny Stevedores and British-American SS Company building.
Date: c1900
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Corner of King Street looking up Fort Street. First National Bank on the right. M.A. Gunst building on left.
Date: c1917
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Samuel Parker and Friends
Date: Unknown
Photographer: Unknown
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


PP-96-13-01
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


PP-96-13-09
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


PP-96-13-016
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections

Hawaii's last King (center) -- King David Kalakaua

PP-96-14-003
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections

I believe that those to the right were Portuguese immigrants

PP-96-19-021
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


PP-97-1-014
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections

I'm not exactly sure where this was taken but it could be on another island

PP-97-1-028
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections

I'm not exactly sure where this was taken but it could be on another island

PP-97-1-027
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


PP-97-2-020
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections

King David Kalakaua

PP-97-2-022
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections


Honolulu Engine Company No. 1.
Date: Unknown
Photographer: Williams, J. J.
Source: Hawaii State Archives Digital Collections

|=========================|

Downtown Honolulu

A view of downtown Honolulu's historic district as it appeared in December 1944.
Photograph: U.S. Marine Corps, Arthur H. Navarre Collection (Courtesy of Diane Hindy) @ Marine Bombing Squadron Six-Thirteen Association

Fort Street in Honolulu

Source: Oahu Publications

May 11 The old Civic Auditorium was torn down in 1974. Built in 1933, it was the home of boxing and wrestling, roller derby, the 'Show of Stars,' and early rock 'n roll. Fabian, Chubby Checker, Sandra Dee, Little Anthony and the Imperials, Chuck Berry and Pat Boone all performed at the Civic.

Source: Oahu Publications

May 8 The home of the late Dr. Sanford Katsuki on Keeaumoku, one of only two homes of Queen Anne architectural style in the state, in a 1975 photo. Saved from demolition, it was to be moved in sections to upper Manoa Valley. But the 79-year-old home was destroyed in a fire in 1978.

Source: Oahu Publications

April 29 The James B. Castle home on Waikiki beach was demolished in 1958 to make way for the present Elks clubhouse.

Source: Oahu Publications

April 16 The Alexander Young Building on Bishop Street in a photo that was published in the Jan. 1, 1904, issue of the Pacific Commercial Advertiser.

Source: Oahu Publications

April 14 The American Factors Building was demolished in 1970 to make way for a new building.

Source: Oahu Publications

On November 1 1962, the United States conducted one of several nuclear tests over Johnston Island. This photo by Advertiser staffer Jerry Chong shows how the fireball from that test lit up Honolulu's night sky.

Source: Oahu Publications

Downtown Honolulu in 1956. That's McInerny on the left. Note the overhead lines for trolley buses.

Source: Oahu Publications

Hollister Drug Co. at the corner of Koko Head and Waialae avenues in an undated photo. There is a First Hawaiian Bank branch at that corner now.

Source: Oahu Publications

The old Dole Cannery pineapple water tank? Built in 1928, it was a Honolulu landmark until it was demolished in 1993. It stored water for the cannery's sprinkler system.

Source: Oahu Publications

From 1924 to 1966, the Castle and Cooke Building at 130 Merchant St was a downtown landmark. It was demolished in 1966 to make way for the Financial Plaza of the Pacific (Advertiser photo by Leland Chong / Feb 8, 1966)

Source: Oahu Publications

Old-timers may remember when there was a Piggly Wiggly grocery store at the corner of 10th and Waialae. This photo from our files is undated.

Source: Oahu Publications

The Stangenwald building on Merchant Street was built in 1901. The six-story structure was the tallest in Honolulu for more than 50 years.

Source: State archives 1912 @ Honolulu Advertiser

Park your auto safely at home and use the street car service in Downtown Honolulu, 1930s.

Source: State of Hawaii -

Hawaii Rapid Transit street cars at King and Fort Streets, Honolulu, 1930s.

Source: State of Hawaii -

OR&L Honolulu Depot 1890

Source: State of Hawaii -

OR&L Station, Alakea Street, Honolulu.

Source: State of Hawaii -

OR&L Honolulu Depot 1914

Source: State of Hawaii -

Oahu Railroad Station, 1890.

Source: State of Hawaii -

Downtown Honolulu and Honolulu Harbor from Punchbowl, 1890.

Source: State of Hawaii -

Honolulu Harbor, June 11, 1924.

Source: State of Hawaii -

Honolulu Harbor, December 25, 1927.

Source: State of Hawaii -

Honolulu Harbor, 1930.

Source: State of Hawaii -

Downtown Honolulu 1938.

Source: State of Hawaii -

Royal Hawaiian Hotel in Waikiki Beach, December 15, 1934.

Source: State of Hawaii -

Cross Roads of Pacific sign at Kau Kau Korner restaurant, Honolulu, 1940s.

Source: State of Hawaii -

Honolulu Harbor and Aloha Tower, 1950s.

Source: State of Hawaii -

Fort Street, Honolulu, Hawaii

Source: University of Hawaii - The Hawaii Nisei Project

More to come....
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2011, 8:29 PM
Dylan Leblanc's Avatar
Dylan Leblanc Dylan Leblanc is online now
Website Manager
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Victoria Canada
Posts: 7,759
very nice!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2011, 10:31 PM
Coldrsx's Avatar
Coldrsx Coldrsx is offline
Community Guy
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 37,921
wow... and yes, shame how much we have lost in so many places for mediocre meh.
__________________
"The destructive effects of automobiles are much less a cause than a symptom of our incompetence at city building" - Jane Jacobs 1961ish

Wake me up when I can see skyscrapers
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2011, 4:14 AM
ColDayMan's Avatar
ColDayMan ColDayMan is offline
B!tchslapping Since 1998
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Cincinnati-Dayton-Columbus
Posts: 18,972
Amazing!
__________________
Click the x: _ _ X _ _!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2011, 6:00 AM
Urbanguy's Avatar
Urbanguy Urbanguy is offline
Go Beavs! Go Niners!
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Portland | Honolulu
Posts: 5,839
Thanks everyone! Here are more historical photos taken around the city/metro area.

Stores on Fort Street Honolulu 1900s

Source: HistoricAmerica.Net

The Old Honolulu Post Office: The two-story building of classic design was at the time of its erection one of the outstanding public buildings in the Hawaiian Kingdom. It is particularly significant in the history of building construction since the structure made early use of concrete in the form of large blocks, laid as ashlar for exterior bearing walls, together with the use of iron bars for reinforcement of formed structural concrete.

Source: HistoricAmerica.Net

[b]Aliiolani Hale[/b ]
Begun in 1871, the Aliiolani Hale was officially opened by the legislature on April 30, 1874. The design is an adaptation by Robert Stirling, Superintendent of Public Works, from a design for a palace for King Kamehameha V submitted by Thomas Rowe, architect, Sydney, Australia. The exterior bearing walls of large molded concrete blocks are original, this being one of the earliest uses of this building material in the United States. The interior has undergone a series of changes which seem to have removed completely any vestiges of the original. Major alterations in 1911-12 by Ripley and Reynolds, architects, completed the transformation with a new structural system of steel and concrete. In addition, the existing octagonal rotunda and cast iron stairways date from this period. In 1941-42, the large addition to the rear (makai) practically doubled the original building. Having housed various government functions throughout its history, it finally came into possession of the courts and is now commonly known as the Judiciary Building.

Source: HistoricAmerica.Net

Iolani Palace, ca. 1883
Residence of the last two royal rulers of Hawaii. Scene of transfer of government to the United States in 1898. From 1898 to 1960s, the palace served as the capitol of Hawaii. When built, the palace was the most elaborate structure in the Hawaiian Islands.

Source: HistoricAmerica.Net

State Capitol under constructon in the background. Photo taken on Kapiolani Blvd. and Drier St. The Advertiser Building is on the left. March 27, 1967.

Source: Jalna.blogspot.com

Statehood celebration at the old Honolulu Stadium. March 13,1959.

Source: Jalna.blogspot.com

Bubonic plague was discovered in Chinatown in December 1899. On Dec. 31, officials began a series of fires intended to destroy areas where it was believed the plague was being transmitted. On Jan. 20, one of those fires was started near Beretania Street and Nu'uanu Avenue, the wind shifted and fire crews could not control the blaze. A total of 38 acres were destroyed. Kaumakapili Church was one of the buildings destroyed that day.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

This photo, circa 1910, from The Advertiser's archives shows the old Hale'iwa Hotel.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

In 1959, what is now Ala Moana Center was a broad expanse of coral fill.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

This photo from Advertiser files is undated. River Street looking toward Punchbowl from King Street is written on the back of the photo.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

Waikiki as it looked in 1960.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

This is an undated photo of Honolulu High School, formerly the residence of Princess Ruth.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

Fort and King streets circa 1900.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

Bunting adorned the Moana Hotel on its opening day, March 11, 1901.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

This is an undated photo of the original Queen's Hospital. The cornerstone was laid in 1860.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

This 1927 photo was taken on the Catholic Mission property facing makai from Beretania. The houses on the left likely are mission houses. The Century Square building is there now. The arched structure in the background was an extension of the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace that at one point extended all the way to Bishop Street. The tree in the middle of the driveway may be the famed, first algarroba (kiawe) tree brought to Hawaii by the Catholic missionaries, the trunk of which was moved next to the present day chancery and has a plaque on it.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

This photo of an aerial view of Pali Highway is dated 1962 and was taken by Werner Stoy of Camera Hawaii.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

The C. Brewer & Company Ltd. In Honolulu in an undated photo.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

Waikiki in 1859.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

This photo of Bishop National Bank, at the corner of King and Bishop streets, is not dated. Bishop National Bank later became First Hawaiian Bank.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

The downtown Library of Hawaii in an undated photo. The Library of Hawaii first opened in 1913.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

The Republic of Hawai'i executive council in its final meeting in 1900. The photo shows S.M. Damon, Alexander Young, S.B. Dole, E.A. Mott-Smith, Kate Kelley and Henry Cooper.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

John Soper, commander of provisional government orces, disarms Queen Lili'uokalani's soldiers at 'Iolani Barracks. The monarchy was overthrown on Jan. 17, 1893.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

Elmer Cravalho, speaker of the territorial legislature, and territorial legislator Spark Matsunaga (right) listen to a phone call from Washington, where Congress was voting to admit Hawai'i into the union.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

Fire rages in Chinatown in January 1900. Most of the area was destroyed by the fire, which had been set to help control bubonic plague, which had been reported in December 1899.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

McKinley High School in an undated photo.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

A regular morning session at the Honolulu Stock Exchange in 1934. The stock exchange closed in 1977.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

Queen Street circa 1871.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

Merchant Sreet. from Bethel Street toward Fort Street in a photo taken in about 1857.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

A Japanese store in an undated photo.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

Streets of downtown Honolulu are decorated for Christmas in this 1949 photo that shows Bishop Street from King Street

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

The Honolulu Police Department headquarters in 1886.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives

Samuel Damon's teahouse in Moanalua Garden, where Damon is said to have served tea, and entertained strangers and local residents on Saturday afternoons This photo was taken by R.J. Baker in 1908.

Source: Honolulu Advertiser Archives
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2011, 9:29 PM
bunt_q's Avatar
bunt_q bunt_q is online now
Provincial Bumpkin
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 10,987
Neat, thanks for putting this together.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2011, 5:23 AM
mthq's Avatar
mthq mthq is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Alaska
Posts: 10,676
great pics! thanks for taking the time to post these urbanguy!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2011, 6:20 AM
Urbanguy's Avatar
Urbanguy Urbanguy is offline
Go Beavs! Go Niners!
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Portland | Honolulu
Posts: 5,839
Thanks for viewing these everyone.

BTW Mthq? How about a Historic Anchorage photo thread?

A little bit of transportation back in the day...

In the Spring of 1901, the new carbarn of the HRT&L Company was almost ready.
The first streetcar run would be on August 31, 1901. Notice the early trailer car
behind the two workers in the center of the image.
Source: StreetCarDays.com


Work crews use a revolutionary machine created by HRT's Ed deHarne
to rip track from the road quickly while in the background,
a snazzy new Brill electric trolley bus glides by quietly on rubber.
Source: StreetCarDays.com


In the mid-1930's. Honolulu Rapid Transit's traditional "maroon and straw"
color scheme was replaced by a burnt orange hue.
Source: StreetCarDays.com


With a newly rebuilt Chinatown in the background, a "barrel car" rumbles
across a streetcar-only bridge connecting Hotel street on the two sides of Nu'uanu Stream.
Source: StreetCarDays.com


It's Steamer Day in Honolulu, a festive occasion where citizens flocked
to the harborfront, along with streetcars and buggies for hire.
Source: StreetCarDays.com


An early photo of car #1 rattling along King Street in Honolulu's historic downtown.
This was long before the installation of traffic lights, and a police officer directs traffic.
Source: StreetCarDays.com


The first electric streetcar system in Honolulu was a small stand-alone operation
created by real estate developer Charles S. Desky in 1900.
Source: StreetCarDays.com


Honolulu's first streetrail system was powered by sedate, aromatic mules.
This famous photo, seen here in color for the first time, has Hans Mortensen at the reins.
Source: StreetCarDays.com


A small electric streetcar whizzes along O'ahu Avenue in Manoa Valley,
with Diamond Head in the background. Manoa was one of the
neighborhoods originally created by the arrival of the rapid transit.
Source: StreetCarDays.com

The old "New Palama Theatre" built in 1929 later renamed the "Zamboanga Theatre" & now a Hispanic church. I like old Chinese style building's like this.


Image Source: Joel Abroad @ Flickr.com

Originally the Palama Theatre was located at 569 N. King Street. It opened in 1919 and closed in 1929. It was an open-air theatre operated by Charles Yee Foy.

Consolidated Amusement Co. built a new theatre nearby at 701 N. King Street in 1929. It opened as the New Palama Theatre on 19th April 1930. It was designed in a Chinese style by architect Louis Davis at a cost of $140,000 and seating was provided for 1,500.

It was re-named Zamboanga Theatre in 1970.

The theatre was leased by Consolidated Amusement to operators from the Phillipines from 1970-74 who renamed it the Zamboanga (after a city and province in the Phillipines) and they showed Filipino films.

After that it was converted to commercial space and leased for many by a printing company. The front arcade with retail space was enclosed by metal roll-up doors and a new large warehouse entrance was made on the side of the building. Inside, the balcony was removed and the floor rake eliminated (although the proscenium/stage area remained and was used for storage, as was the original lobby).

After they left, it was subdivided into two spaces and a (Hispanic) church is now in the front half and the back half is commercial space

Source (a couple of commenters): CinemaTreasures.org

More to come eventually.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2011, 7:54 PM
ethereal_reality's Avatar
ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Lafayette/West Lafayette IN, Purdue U.
Posts: 6,048
You have done an incredible job with this thread urbanguy.
It was extremely interesting and very informative......I appreciate all the hard work you put into it. BRAVO!

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Dec 16, 2011 at 1:28 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2011, 8:24 PM
PHX31's Avatar
PHX31 PHX31 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Central PHX
Posts: 6,045
Very cool and very interesting pictures. I know next to nothing about Honolulu, especially historic Honolulu. How much of the historic buildings/houses do you think remain? 50%? 25%? more/less?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2011, 12:38 AM
Urbanguy's Avatar
Urbanguy Urbanguy is offline
Go Beavs! Go Niners!
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Portland | Honolulu
Posts: 5,839
You're welcome!

@ PHX31, there's only a tiny percentage left the majority that are are located in Chinatown/The Art's District, Capitol District & tiny pockets through out the city, sadly.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Dec 17, 2011, 6:31 PM
corn1971 corn1971 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 7
A quick little playing around in Photoshop with one of the images from the Hawaiian State Archive that Urbanguy posted.


Hawaiian Hotel-restore by corn1971, on Flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Dec 17, 2011, 7:38 PM
ethereal_reality's Avatar
ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Lafayette/West Lafayette IN, Purdue U.
Posts: 6,048
Nice job. What a beautiful building.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 1:48 AM
Urbanguy's Avatar
Urbanguy Urbanguy is offline
Go Beavs! Go Niners!
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Portland | Honolulu
Posts: 5,839
Downtown Honolulu 1970

Source: Doug Johnson 1940@flickr.com

Source: Doug Johnson 1940@flickr.com

Old Town Honolulu 1956

Source: Kamaaina56@flickr.com
Waikiki 1961

Source: Kamaaina56@flickr.com
Waikiki 1960

Source: Kamaaina56@flickr.com
Waikiki 1957

Source: Kamaaina56@flickr.com
Looking towards Waikiki 1966

Source: Kamaaina56@flickr.com
Honolulu Harbor 1949

Source: Kamaaina56@flickr.com
Looking towards Diamond Head Crater from Punchbowl Crater. The dome in the photo is Honolulu Civic Auditorium on South King Street at Keeaumoku (built 1933, demolished 1974). Above it is the screen at Kapiolani Drive In Theater (built 1949, demolished 1962). In the distance is pre-Ilikai Waikiki.

Source: Kamaaina56@flickr.com
Dole Pineapple Tower - It had been demolished many years ago but I remember it when I was kid & always thought that it was cool.

Source: Kamaaina56@flickr.com
Hawaiian Village Hotel Kaiser Dome c1957
The iconic geodesic dome at the entrance to industrialist Henry J. Kaiser's Hawaiian Village Hotel on Kalia Road in Waikiki. Built 1957 for the world premier of the Cinerama movie "Around the World in Eighty Days." Demolished 1999 to make way for the Kalia Tower which opened 2001.

Source: Kamaaina56@flickr.com
King Theater Honolulu 1956
View looking diamond head along South King Street in downtown Honolulu from around Bethel Street.
The King Theater opened 1935 and closed 1986 per the 2011 Arcadia Publishing book “Theatres of Hawaii” by Lowell Angell. The movie “Blue Hawaii” starring “The King” (Elvis Presley) premiered here in 1961.

Source: Kamaaina56@flickr.com

Hackfield Building, corner Nimitz Hwg and Bishop Street, demolished, date unknown, Honolulu, Hawaii, Photo sources unknown

Source: GerTakano@flickr.com

Chinatown, c 1960s, Honolulu, Hawaii, Photo sources unknown

Source: GerTakano@flickr.com

Honolulu Chinatown Brothel before Urban Renewal,c 1960s, Honolulu, Hawaii, Photo sources unknown

Source: GerTakano@flickr.com

Downtown Japanese theater, date unknown, Honolulu, Hawaii, Photo sources unknown

Source: GerTakano@flickr.com

Fort Street Mall, Christmas, 1971, Honolulu, Hawaii, Photo sources unknown

Source: GerTakano@flickr.com

c 1950s Waikikian Hotel lobby, Honolulu, Hawaii. Demolished. photo source unknown.

Source: GerTakano@flickr.com

Fort Street before mall, c 1950s, Honolulu, Hawaii, Photo sources unknown

Source: GerTakano@flickr.com
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Photography Forums > Found City Photos
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 5:26 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.