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  #261  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2012, 3:56 PM
PittPenn 03 PittPenn 03 is offline
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Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
I assume you mean they are tearing off the lower granite facade--if so that is great (it is obviously not original and out of character with the upper floors and the historic Cultural District buildings in general).
Yes - it is the lower granite that they are tearing off.
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  #262  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2012, 11:39 PM
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http://www.postgazette.com/pg/12038/1208621-53-0.stm

Quote:
Go-ahead for razing terminal in Strip District goes before URA
Tuesday, February 07, 2012
By Mark Belko, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


With the demolition of the Civic Arena in full swing, the city is preparing to give its consent to bring down part of another landmark building -- the Strip District's historic produce terminal.

Urban Redevelopment Authority board members are expected to vote Thursday on a memorandum of understanding that clears the way for the Buncher Co. to demolish more than 500 feet of the 1,478-foot-long building as part of a proposed riverfront development.

Removing the western portion of the five-block-long URA-owned terminal would create a path to extend 17th Street to the Allegheny River. It is a key element of a plan to build as many as 1,000 units of housing on Buncher-owned property, mostly used for parking right now, behind the produce terminal.

Joanna Doven, spokeswoman for Mayor Luke Ravenstahl, said the URA's action Thursday "will trigger millions of dollars of economic activity that will bring jobs and residents" into the Strip.

"We see this development as something that has the potential to create economic activity for years and years as we open up the riverfront to more development," she said.

Tom Balestrieri, Buncher president and CEO, said the more immediate effect of the decision will be to allow his firm to go ahead with millions of dollars in infrastructure work, including the construction of a new road that will start at 11th Street and run parallel to Smallman Street behind the terminal, in anticipation of future development. That work, which also will involve new water and sewer lines, sidewalks and traffic signals, is expected to start this spring.

Mr. Balestrieri said demolition work on the terminal probably won't start for some time, noting that the leases of the handful of produce wholesalers still in the building don't expire until the end of the year.

"It's not likely that it will happen this year, let me put it that way," he said of the razing.

The future of the wholesalers, so interwoven in the history of the Strip, has yet to be decided, although it is likely that they will be moved elsewhere at some point.

Buncher and the city are moving forward with the memorandum of understanding after the federal advisory council for historic preservation determined that no formal federal historic review process was required in deciding the fate of the terminal.

In anticipation of a possible federal review process, both parties had been engaged in consultations with various organizations over preservation aspects for months.

Arthur Ziegler, president of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation, said that Buncher "has been very cooperative in discussing solutions" regarding the building.

While the foundation would have liked the entire building to remain intact, it is willing to live with the decision to tear down the western side, which is the newest part of the structure, Mr. Ziegler said.

"[The terminal] has great history, but we want the new development on the river and I think the mayor has done a good job at leading everyone to the best possible solution," he said.

Razing a section at one end is preferable, he said, to proposals that cut the building into three sections to create pathways for roads.

"We didn't like that." Mr. Ziegler said. "We liked to have one long continuous building."

As part of the redevelopment, Buncher also has agreed to keep the terminal's "historic fabric" intact, Ms. Doven said. It will replace the original windows and doors with historically accurate replicas while at the same time modernizing the structure to make it more accessible.

Buncher also promised that the area around the building will remain "urbanized" in the context of the redevelopment around it, Mr. Ziegler said. "We don't want the building sitting in a green patch as if it were out the suburbs," he said.

Not everyone is as comfortable with the proposed action, however. Scott Leib, president of Preservation Pittsburgh, which fought the razing of the Civic Arena, said the group was opposed to the partial demolition of the terminal.

Unlike the Landmarks Foundation, Preservation Pittsburgh supported a cut through the building. Since no federal review is required, the only way to protect the exterior now is to designate it as a city historic structure, Mr. Leib said.

"We are contemplating if we want to go down that road," he added.

Also on Thursday the URA board will vote on a proposed letter of intent with Buncher and the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation that would establish a fund to provide financing to building owners in the Strip to upgrade their facades.

The initial funding is expected to be about $25,000. The goal is to help property owners restore their building facades to their original form "rather than modernizing them in unfortunate ways," Mr. Ziegler said. The foundation will administer the fund.



Read more: http://www.postgazette.com/pg/12038/...#ixzz1lk4p8BT1
Personally, I'd like for them to leave the entire 1,478-foot-long structure in tact and to be entirely occupied by the Public Market. I envisioned that having been to Seattle's Pikes Place and to the Public Market back in November. I do believe that a housing development is needed there, but is extending 17th Street through there really necessary? Besides, any development that goes there should really consider heavy bike/pedestrian traffic, pedestrian traffic in particular...
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  #263  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2012, 7:52 PM
TBone7281 TBone7281 is offline
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2/8/2012

Lot 24 - working in the snow.

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  #264  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 1:36 AM
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http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pitt.../s_780497.html

Quote:
Mt. Washington project may proceed

By Sam Spatter, FOR THE PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Wednesday, February 8, 2012
About the writer
Sam Spatter is a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review staff writer and can be reached at 412-320-7843 or via e-mail.


An effort to develop the former Edge Restaurant property in Mt. Washington will continue after a New York-based lender provided new financing, the developer said on Tuesday.

Manhattan, N.Y.-based Emerald Creek Capital this week closed a $1.55 million loan to developer Beau Beemsterboer, who has plans for a $100 million complex along Grandview Avenue -- which would include a 20-story hotel, two restaurants, 55 condominiums and a 472-space parking garage.

"When we purchased the property, we received a seller's mortgage (from former owner Dr. Fran Hurite). Although the note wasn't due until April 1, when we were able to secure refinancing from Emerald Creek, we decided to pay off the $1.1 million note," said Beemsterboer, who with his father, Steven, heads the development company, Sycamore Grandview Development Inc.

With bank credit difficult to obtain, local real estate experts have said the developers will need deep pockets to obtain construction financing.

The Chicago-area family has said they used their own funds to purchase additional properties adjacent to the Edge site, along former Vinecliff Street and on Sycamore Street. They also financed the demolition of the restaurant and adjoining residential units, and prepared the 400,000-square-foot area for development. In total, the family has said it spent about $5 million on the project.

"With this financing in place, we can finalize our development plan," said Beau Beemsterboer, vice president.

"It gives us the time to obtain more financing for the construction phase, and to wait for when the appropriate financing becomes available, with hope that next year the market will rebound, especially for the hotel," he said.

There is no time schedule for construction to start, he said.

The main family business is Beemsterboer Slag Co. Its primary business is coal, coke and salt commodities trading.

The long-planned One Grandview project was approved by the city in 2010, and demolition of the long-vacant Edge Restaurant and adjoining residential properties was completed last spring, leaving a vacant site. It is adjacent to the Monongahela Incline, at Grandview Avenue and Wyoming Street.

"Emerald Creek Capital found the borrower's strong credit history and financials made the company comfortable about the loan's chances of repayment," said Mark Bahiri, Emerald's managing partner.

During the past 12 months, the developer lobbied City Council to designate the 20-plus parcels as a single lot. Council also approved the area being reclassified as a single zone, Bahiri said.



Read more: Mt. Washington project may proceed - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pitt...#ixzz1lqPNn3hU
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  #265  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 1:42 AM
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Thanks for posting that article! I noticed it in this morning's Post-Gazette as well, but I didn't have time to post it over here!

Wouldn't it be nice if this project eventually comes to fruition? I can't imagine it wouldn't, given the incredible city views that it has! It will just take time, though. Seems that many banks are simply afraid to lend money for Pittsburgh developments, it seems many of them still think of the 'burgh as if its economy's stuck in the disaster of the late 70's-early 90's...

Aaron (Glowrock)
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  #266  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 1:59 AM
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http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/12039/1208709-28.stm

Quote:
Developer eyes Liberty Ave. cigar factory

Wednesday, February 08, 2012
By Mark Belko, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


After successfully converting a vacant three-story building on Forbes Avenue into apartments and a restaurant, Mike Clements is back for an encore.

The developer is seeking to transform an old cigar wrapping facility at 604 Liberty Ave., Downtown, into a two- or three-bedroom townhouse with a street level cafe or bistro.

He is getting assistance from the city Urban Redevelopment Authority, which has secured a grant of up to $200,000 to help make safety and code improvements to the vacant three-story building near Heinz Hall.

Mr. Clements, president of Iron City Ventures, hopes to begin renovation work this summer and have the URA-owned building ready for occupancy by the end of the year. He will take ownership when the work is completed.

He plans to convert the upper floors into a townhouse with high ceilings, bamboo floors and two to three bedrooms.

Outside, he hopes to return the building's exterior to its early 1900s appearance when a restaurant named Rudy's occupied it. He believes the building dates back even further, to at least 1885.

The developer also intends to restore several windows that were covered over in the past. He expects to spend $500,000 to $600,000 on the renovations.

"We're bringing back the historical look of the building," he said.

Mr. Clements sees parallels between his latest Downtown project and the 308 Forbes renovation, where he converted the upper floors into two loft-style apartments and brought in Penn Avenue Fish Co. to open a restaurant on the first floor.

"I want to be like the small-building guy Downtown. Now that I have the blueprint to it, there are a lot of these smaller buildings that no one pays attention to," he said. "I love the retail-residential mix. That's what Downtown needs."

The grant the URA is supplying is coming from a gambling-financed community infrastructure tourism fund overseen by the county's redevelopment authority.

Mr. Clements' building is the second in the vicinity being renovated. PNC Financial Services Group is upgrading a structure at 600 Liberty near the Fairmont Hotel.

Mark Belko: mbelko@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1262.
First published on February 8, 2012 at 12:00 am


Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/12039...#ixzz1lqVQZ5cv
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  #267  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 2:38 AM
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Excellent news on the loan for the One Grandview project! From my understanding, they'll use that loan for their final design work to make this thing shovel-ready (I'm guessing anyway). I wonder if there are easily secureable grants out there for shovel-ready projects that would be considered transit-oriented development. This is a mixed-use development right next to the Mon Incline, which will lead to a popular entertainment destination as well as a T stop, allowing for connections into Downtown and the South Hills...

The townhouse project should be a nice project Downtown, also.
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  #268  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 2:25 PM
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http://postgazette.com/pg/12040/1209000-53.stm

Quote:
Toby Keith bar and grill could join North Shore

Thursday, February 09, 2012
By Mark Belko, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Country singer Toby Keith may be choosing the north over the south.

Continental Real Estate Cos. is talking to his representatives about opening a Toby Keith's I Love This Bar and Grill on the North Shore near Heinz Field instead of at the SouthSide Works.

The discussions come after an effort to build the restaurant on the South Side riverfront collapsed, triggering a lawsuit that charged that the Toby Keith franchise did not live up to its lease obligations.

On the North Shore, the venue would anchor a new development proposed by Continental and its partners, the Steelers and the Pirates, on the front half of a 3.3-acre parcel closest to North Shore Drive and next to Stage AE.

Under an amended agreement with the city's Stadium Authority, Continental and the teams have until Dec. 31 to start development of the parcel. They are proposing two buildings at the site, with restaurants or entertainment at street level and offices above them.

Frank Kass, Continental's chairman, confirmed that the developer has been talking to representatives of the Toby Keith franchise about opening a venue on the North Shore.

He said no final deal has been reached.

Continental had talked to representatives of Mr. Keith, a lifelong Steelers fan, about locating on the North Shore before the deal was reached to build on the South Side.

Gregory McClure, president of Boomtown Entertainment LLC, which owns and operates Toby Keith's I Love This Bar and Grill locations throughout the country, declined comment Wednesday about the latest talks.

In an earlier interview, he said the restaurant chain was still interested in opportunities in the Pittsburgh area, despite the collapse of the SouthSide Works deal and the subsequent litigation.

"We've put out feelers all over the city. We're still looking in the Pittsburgh area and when we have something more concrete, I probably can give you a comment," he said.

The lawsuit, filed in June in Allegheny County Common Pleas Court by an affiliate of the Soffer Organization, the SouthSide Works developer, sought a judgment of $460,005 against CRGE Pittsburgh LLC, an arm of Toby Keith's I Love This Bar and Grill.

Boomtown Entertainment is separate from CRGE Pittsburgh, Mr. McClure said.

The complaint maintains that CRGE defaulted on the lease agreement by failing to provide financial statements and evidence of equity financing. Lawyers for CRGE are contesting the allegations.

In more recent court filing, the two sides indicated that they were trying to settle the case. Robert Stein, an attorney for CRGE, said Wednesday those discussions are continuing.

"Right now, the parties are focused on exploring a settlement alternative," he said.

...
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  #269  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 2:34 PM
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Yay, at least this institution of "American Redneckery" will be on the other side of the river from where I live!

Want some "Freedom Fries" with that burger?

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  #270  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 2:56 PM
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Well if Keith has to open one, I guess by Heinz Field makes sense, since whatever goes there will be some cheesy chain anyway.

As for the Cigar building... a townhouse? Is that correct. Massive renovations for a townhouse downtown? Not a small apt building, but for one dwelling?
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  #271  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 3:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by themaguffin View Post
Well if Keith has to open one, I guess by Heinz Field makes sense, since whatever goes there will be some cheesy chain anyway.

As for the Cigar building... a townhouse? Is that correct. Massive renovations for a townhouse downtown? Not a small apt building, but for one dwelling?
anyone have a photo of this building?
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  #272  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 4:08 PM
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  #273  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 4:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glowrock View Post
Wouldn't it be nice if this project eventually comes to fruition? I can't imagine it wouldn't, given the incredible city views that it has! It will just take time, though. Seems that many banks are simply afraid to lend money for Pittsburgh developments, it seems many of them still think of the 'burgh as if its economy's stuck in the disaster of the late 70's-early 90's...

Aaron (Glowrock)
Yes, it would be awesome to see a development of this scale on Mt. Washington.

Though, considering the long history of failed development proposals on Mt. Washington over the years, I CAN imagine that it will not come to fruition --at least not in the form of the current vision. But I remain hopeful -- trying to envision a tower there whenever I look up at the site.

The fact that this "developer" still requires a paltry $1.55 million loan to finance planning of the development after 2+ years should not inspire too much confidence. A $1.55 million loan to the developer? Yikes.

Mt. Washington is a risky location all around. Yes, the views are wonderful, but access is atrocious and infrastructure is highly inadequate -- especially for a proposed $100 million hotel/residential project. Sure, the project could serve as a strong anchor for future development in the area... but, it's a very tall order to bet on that.
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  #274  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 6:08 PM
MattofSloppyVariety MattofSloppyVariety is offline
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I remember when this house was being built and thinking to myself 'what the hell are they doing?'




http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/09/ga...tion.html?_r=3

An Industrial Strength House in Pittsburgh

Tony Cenicola/The New York Times
Bob and Kim Zielinski's home is cantilevered over their glass factory in Pittsburgh.
By JOYCE WADLER
Published: February 8, 2012
For a Pittsburgh Couple, a Radical Departure
WHEN Bob Zielinski, a former marine who owns a glass manufacturing company here, and his wife, Kim, showed contractors plans for the house they wanted to build — a 53-foot-long glass-and-steel wedge cantilevered over their factory — the contractors said they couldn’t do it. You’d have to get guys who build bridges and do highway work to create the support system for something like that, they said.

So, that’s exactly what the Zielinskis did.

It took three years to build, but the Emerald Art Glass House (named after the Zielinskis’ company, Emerald Art Glass) now hovers above the factory in the South Side neighborhood, overlooking the Monongahela River, railway line and bridges.

Eric Fisher, the couple’s architect, says proudly that the cantilevered extension is three times the length of the one at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater. And that it recalls the tradition of the owner living over the shop.

The Zielinskis offer other reasons for the design. They raised two children in a traditional home in the suburbs and wanted something different. They wanted to be near their business. They also thought some privacy would be nice.

“I don’t want to be right on top of my neighbors, I don’t want to hear them fighting, I want a little peace and quiet,” says Mr. Zielinski, who has the I-know-what-I-want-and-damned-if-I’m-going-to-settle attitude of a self-made man. “I start looking around South Side to build a house, I can’t find anything I like. You’re paying $200,000 or $300,000 to be packed right into the neighborhood.”

Come at the house straight on, driving across the river up to the door of the factory on Josephine Street, and you might not notice it, for the factory is two stories high and the house is set so far back. But walk a half-block down the street, past the neighboring wood-frame houses, and look up, and it will stop you in your tracks.

The house looms over the street like a big industrial arm. There is no way it should fit in, and yet it does. For this is not just Steeltown, it’s the City of Bridges — 446, by one count. But try to find the door, and you face an obstacle: there isn’t one, at least not one you can easily get to. The driveway is hidden behind a tall wooden fence and gate.

“I like that people don’t know how to get in,” Mr. Zielinski says, opening the gate and driving a reporter in with his Jeep.

Mr. Zielinski, who is 53, grew up in Pittsburgh, the oldest of six children. He joined the Marines at 17 and then tried various jobs, from carpenter to cheese factory worker. Nothing interested him until he began dating a woman who did stained-glass repair. Mr. Zielinski asked her to teach him, and from that point on, “I was, like, addicted,” he said.

He started his company in the mid-1980s, and today it has 16 employees and clients like Armani Exchange and De Beers Jewellery.

Ms. Zielinski, who is 54, grew up in Michigan. School didn’t interest her much, she says; she wanted to get out and work. She did a number of jobs, like cleaning house and bartending. She and Mr. Zielinski met after she moved to Pittsburgh. They married in 1985, raising her children from her first marriage, Melissa, now 33, and Cass, 32.

They wanted to spend the next chapter of their lives near their business, but were hoping for a radical departure from the traditional homes they had lived in. The hilly lot they owned behind the factory was not very large, so building a house on top of the factory made sense. For inspiration, they drove along the rivers, photographing old steel structures; the one they liked most was a steel building on concrete pillars that jutted out over the Monongahela. But when they showed the photos to architects, their ideas, Ms. Zielinski says, were awful.

“One architect just made a section of our factory roof flat and put a traditional house on top of it,” she says. “One did a house where one section was glass, and we could look down into the factory. I said: ‘Why would I want to look into my shop? I just spent the whole day there.’ ”

Mr. Fisher, who had started his own firm, Fisher Architecture, a few years earlier, studied the picture, and then suggested something different: building the spine of the house on the lot behind the factory and cantilevering a section over the factory roof. At one of their first meetings, Ms. Zielinski recalls, he drew a sketch for her on a paper towel. “I was very calm, but my whole insides, there was like a party going on. I went out to the factory and said to Bob, ‘We have our architect.’ ”

Mr. Zielinski refused to give him a budget. “I just said, ‘Build it, and when we run out of money, we’ll stop and make some more,’ ” he says.

Fortunately, they never had to do that. Acting as the contractor, Mr. Zielinski brought costs down to about $225 a square foot. Construction challenges included digging two seven-foot-wide holes 35 feet into bedrock and filling them with concrete and steel to support the cantilevered sections of the five-level, 6,900-square-foot house.

The entry is a high-ceilinged garage with a playful 1950s-style air-raid shelter sign in front of a commercial elevator. On the second floor is a TV room and a gym. The third floor is a cantilevered great room with an open kitchen and, a few steps up, a living and dining room offering a panoramic view. A second set of stairs leads up to the couple’s bedroom.

Ask them about favorite moments in the house, and the answer varies. Mr. Zielinski loves to sit at the far end of the living room at night, where he can see out while ironwork prevents neighbors from seeing in. Ms. Zielinski likes to watch the shadows on the glass wall in the bedroom.

“Something’s always moving,” she says. “You see things that you really didn’t notice before, that you didn’t really pay attention to, even the way the clouds come in.” It “almost feels like it breathes,” she adds. “It’s wonderful.”
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  #275  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 6:22 PM
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Interesting article about that crazy house! Actually, that place is only a few blocks from where I live up on the Slopes! No doubt, the cantilevering of that house is simply amazing!

Aaron (Glowrock)
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  #276  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 7:15 PM
BrianTH BrianTH is online now
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Great wealth + misanthropy is a good formula for some fascinating architecture.
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  #277  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 8:22 PM
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2/9/2012

Lot 24


Civic Arena Demo


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  #278  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 8:26 PM
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For those who haven't had the pleasure of catching a glimpse of this masterpiece?...









All images: http://fisherarch.com/



I've always thought the house was rather silly -- given the context. If it was tucked in the hillside and trees rose up beneath it... or it extended out over a creek or classic industrial building or something like that, then I think it would be pretty cool. But extending over the mint green, corrugated aluminum peaked roof of a nondescript and cobbled-together trailer... does nothing for me.

Now, that cantilever extending over those trees higher on the hill in that first pic... now we're talking pimp-ass crib.
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  #279  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 9:31 PM
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I'm surprised nobody posted this regarding the Mt. Lebanon LRT station:

From the PittsburghLive/Tribune-Review website:

Quote:
Mt. Lebanon T station development could be 'big'
By Matthew Santoni
PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, February 9, 2012


Developers could create prime real estate in Mt. Lebanon's Uptown business district out of thin air, if engineers' concepts for a deck above the Port Authority light-rail line come to fruition.

Under a contract with the municipality, engineers from Los Angeles-based AECOM have been studying how to utilize air rights Mt. Lebanon owns above the rails, perhaps by building on a deck that would cover the tracks. Mt. Lebanon Parking Authority purchased the air rights from the Port Authority in the 1980s. The rights passed to the municipality when it absorbed the Parking Authority last year.

If a developer could be found, the possibilities are big, said Commercial Districts Manager Eric Milliron.

"Until there's a developer, and a market study, and a design of it, we'd be playing Nostradamus," said Milliron, who helped conduct a public meeting last week on the engineers' study. "But what we can know is how big of a Lego set can we build. A developer could do a very big project there."

The study stemmed from Mt. Lebanon's push for "transit-oriented development," which would cluster residential and commercial developments around public transportation to improve the usefulness of both.

AECOM dealt mainly with technical details, such as where support columns would go, which materials to use, and how big the buildings could be above the rails that run behind the central business district. Studies included renderings of a hypothetical development based on the biggest project the site could support.

"It really is the largest opportunity for economic development," Milliron said, noting how few large open parcels are left to build upon in the municipality. "We have a saying around here that 'God isn't going to create any more real estate in Mt. Lebanon.' "

Ideally, the deck could be built over rails from the rear of Potomac Bakery to just outside the exit of the light rail tunnel between Mt. Lebanon and Dormont, level with the alley behind businesses fronting Washington Road. The existing tunnel portal would remain uncovered for ventilation reasons, but the result would be plenty of space for developments along Shady Avenue East, connected to the Uptown corridor with a pedestrian plaza, Milliron said.

Over the existing light-rail station, the deck could be large and sturdy enough to support a 235-car parking garage spanning the tracks, with a revamped train station on its ground level. At the other end of the deck, the densest possible development could include a block of mid-rise offices, retail space or condominiums.

AECOM is not the first agency in the South Hills to envision building above Port Authority's land. For nearly a decade, Lawrenceville-based developer James Aiello Sr. has been exploring building a deck above the park-and-ride lot in Castle Shannon, with a mix of retail and residential buildings on the deck.

Next week, Aiello said he'd meet informally with representatives of the Keystone Oaks School District to discuss possible Tax Increment Financing. That would give the project a tax break and steer the money to build infrastructure, Aiello said. He is focusing on private financing for the $32 million to $35 million development, after trying to get government money.



Read more: Mt. Lebanon T station development could be 'big' - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pitt...#ixzz1lvFZDNsK
I'd like to see what exactly those renderings looked like. What on earth are developers envisioning for this deck over the LRT stop?!!
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  #280  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2012, 11:26 PM
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Evergrey Evergrey is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Pittsburgh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianTH View Post
Great wealth + misanthropy is a good formula for some fascinating architecture.
Great quote.

I don't have a problem with this unique house, however... given its rather random location... it's a quite ingenious attempt to develop value where there otherwise would be none.
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