HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum

Since 1999, the SkyscraperPage Forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web. The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics. Welcome!

You are currently browsing as a guest. Register with the SkyscraperPage Forum and join this growing community of skyscraper enthusiasts. Registering has benefits such as fewer ads, the ability to post messages, private messaging and more.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2012, 10:23 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 34,278
From Metropolitans to Megapolitans

From Metropolitans to Megapolitans


Apr 07 2012

By Robert Lang

Read More: http://citiwire.net/columns/from-met...-megapolitans/

Quote:
In a space as large as France, the Netherlands and Belguim combined, America’s megapolitans house more than 2.5 times as many people. In fact, they are more densely settled than Europe as a whole and, by some estimates, will house two-thirds of the U.S. population by 2040.

- It is true the average population density in the U.S.—about 100 persons per square mile—is roughly half that of Western European countries. But the comparison is misguided. The U.S. has a significant amount of densely settled urban areas scattered throughout. While megapolitans occupy only 17 percent of the continuous 48 states’ land base, America’s megapolitan clusters, as a group, form the world’s third most populous country, behind China and India.

- Megapolitans, as they are often referred to, are strings of metropolitan areas connected by shared transportation networks, labor markets and culture. The megapolitan clusters are metropolitan regions networked either by commuting, trucking, or commuter airlines and separated by less than 550 miles. Thus far, metropolitans view nearby regions as competitors rather than partners. In fact, only one metropolitan area has a regionally elected governing body: the Metro Council of Portland, Oregon, created in the 1980s. No other region has followed suit.

- Metropolitan partnerships can help secure a region’s vitality in the global economy. Phoenix and Tucson, for instance, can pool their collective assets and markets to produce a global gateway known as the Sun Corridor. Phoenix is a large-scale region with an international airport and global links. Tucson received the state’s original land grant university, and is home to the University of Arizona, which has strong research capacity in space science and optics and contains the main branch of Arizona’s medical school. Roughly speaking, Phoenix has the global access and Tucson has the technology.

- Local elected officials and business leaders in Orlando and Tampa are following suit to create the Florida Corridor — its goal to combine Orlando’s tourist economy and global connectivity with Tampa’s major port and industries tied to logistics. Cooperation among megapolitans such as Seattle-Portland or Chicago-Detroit-Cleveland-Pittsburgh becomes increasingly important as the federal government must ensure that taxpayer money spent on infrastructure improvements and resource-land management is not wasted. Our past proves a lack of planning at a broad level can produce inefficient outcomes, as is the case with several transportation infrastructure projects.

- While our cities and counties increasingly get on board with regional collaboration, this process requires a shift in the way we traditionally think about the many cities and counties that surround us. For instance, despite the strong objections by local officials and business leaders, Florida Gov. Rick Scott killed high speed rail between Tampa and Orlando. We can recognize his rationale was tied political discourse rather than disdain for regional collaboration. Nonetheless, his actions dampened the chances for regional integration between Tampa and Orlando and stifled their ability to compete against other megapolitans which have pooled their metropolitans’ talent and resources to create a single unified region.

.....
__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 3:39 AM
JManc's Avatar
JManc JManc is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 18,167
an arizona megapolitan? it's 100 miles of catci, ostrich farms and nothingness separating tucson from phoenix.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 1:28 PM
MolsonExport's Avatar
MolsonExport MolsonExport is online now
The Vomit Bag.
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Liver & Onions
Posts: 22,337
And how about European Megapolitans. Silly article. Seems more about Megasprawlitans.
__________________
There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don't know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don't know we don't know. -Donald Rumsfeld
Didn't you notice on the plane when you started talking, eventually I started reading the vomit bag?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 1:42 PM
Don B. Don B. is offline
...
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 9,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
an arizona megapolitan? it's 100 miles of catci, ostrich farms and nothingness separating tucson from phoenix.
Actually, not so much anymore. Except for the Gila River Indian Reservation (which has development of it's own along I-10 just south of Phoenix, including a new high-rise casino hotel and other operations), the gaps are filling in, and cities are springing up between the two. Maricopa has over 43,000 people now, Eloy 12,000, Casa Grande 50,000, Florence 26,000, Coolidge 10,000 and more...Pinal County (the county between the two cities) has suburbs of Phoenix sprawling in from the north and suburbs of Tucson sprawling up from the south, and the population has surged thusly:

1970 67,916
1980 90,918
1990 116,379
2000 179,727
2010 375,770

--don
__________________
My website:

www.aroundphoenix.com
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 3:51 PM
10023's Avatar
10023 10023 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 11,307
The only valid point that I got from the blurb posted above (didn't click the link) was that comparing the density of the U.S. to the density of Europe is pointless, because the U.S. contains vast areas that are sparsely inhabited or uninhabited (or even uninhabitable), whereas Europe is geographically perfect for human habitation and lacks big empty spaces.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 4:09 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 34,278
The emphasis here is greater regional co-operation instead of competition, and benefiting from what unique things the individual cities have to offer as a collective.

And also be responsible for collectively lobbying for regional infrastructure projects and not have to feel held obligated to follow the Tea Party in Washington who'll oppose any large infrastructure improvement for the sake of it having to do with infrastructure.
__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 4:57 PM
10023's Avatar
10023 10023 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 11,307
The problem is that the U.S. is completely fucked when it comes to urban or even metro/megapolitan policy because of the design of our legislature.

Simply put, as long as every state gets 2 senators, we will be behind Europe on that stuff, because of a stupid part of our Constitution that says Wyoming gets the same Senate reprsentation as California or Texas.

You can't get anything related to infrastructure through Congress without loading it down with enough pork to get the less populated states on board, which is why Amtrak still runs trains it shouldn't and will never be profitable (or even close), no matter how expensive and uncompetitive it makes its trains in the Northeast Corridor.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 5:07 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 34,278
I guess we'll have to see how effective these state corridors will be. That existing greater Portland council could provide an indication.
__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 8:40 PM
eternallyme eternallyme is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,635
About the megalopolitans, could the gap in the Appalachians be filled between the Great Lakes and the Northeast Corridor for a 7-shaped megalopolis from the Midwest into the Northeast and Southeast?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 8:50 PM
MolsonExport's Avatar
MolsonExport MolsonExport is online now
The Vomit Bag.
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Liver & Onions
Posts: 22,337
The whole country is a megapolitan rex. CMA=313 million. biggest city in the world
__________________
There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don't know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don't know we don't know. -Donald Rumsfeld
Didn't you notice on the plane when you started talking, eventually I started reading the vomit bag?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 8:55 PM
10023's Avatar
10023 10023 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 11,307
Quote:
Originally Posted by eternallyme View Post
About the megalopolitans, could the gap in the Appalachians be filled between the Great Lakes and the Northeast Corridor for a 7-shaped megalopolis from the Midwest into the Northeast and Southeast?
Have you ever driven across Pennsylvania?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 9:32 PM
JManc's Avatar
JManc JManc is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 18,167
Quote:
Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
The whole country is a megapolitan rex. CMA=313 million. biggest city in the world
OMG. take that Shanghai!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 10:28 PM
Jonboy1983's Avatar
Jonboy1983 Jonboy1983 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: The absolute western-most point of the Philadelphia urbanized area. :)
Posts: 1,423
Quote:
Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
Have you ever driven across Pennsylvania?
Haven't you heard? Bedford, Breezwood, Carlisle, and the rest of the lower Susquehanna River Valley are banding together to form an up-and-coming urbanized area!!

__________________
Transportation planning, building better communities of tomorrow through superior connections between them today...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 3:26 AM
Wheelingman04's Avatar
Wheelingman04 Wheelingman04 is offline
Pittsburgh rocks!!
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Salem, OH (near Youngstown)
Posts: 8,730
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonboy1983 View Post
haven't you heard? Bedford, breezwood, carlisle, and the rest of the lower susquehanna river valley are banding together to form an up-and-coming urbanized area!!

lol
__________________
1 hour from Pittsburgh and 1 hour from Cleveland
Go Ohio State!!
Ohio Proud!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 3:52 AM
JManc's Avatar
JManc JManc is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 18,167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don B. View Post
Actually, not so much anymore. Except for the Gila River Indian Reservation (which has development of it's own along I-10 just south of Phoenix, including a new high-rise casino hotel and other operations), the gaps are filling in, and cities are springing up between the two. Maricopa has over 43,000 people now, Eloy 12,000, Casa Grande 50,000, Florence 26,000, Coolidge 10,000 and more...Pinal County (the county between the two cities) has suburbs of Phoenix sprawling in from the north and suburbs of Tucson sprawling up from the south, and the population has surged thusly:

1970 67,916
1980 90,918
1990 116,379
2000 179,727
2010 375,770

--don
ok. i was last on that stretch in 2003 so i'm sure much has changed.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 3:56 AM
hudkina hudkina is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 7,439
Quote:
Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
Have you ever driven across Pennsylvania?
The primary route of the "megapolitan area" would be through upstate New York. Buffalo ---> Rochester ---> Syracuse ---> Utica ---> Albany ---> New York
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 9:31 AM
ardecila's Avatar
ardecila ardecila is offline
vertical
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: unconventionally bicoastal
Posts: 10,711
Throw this in the face of anybody who says rail won't work in the US because we're just not dense enough.

Of course, this may be true on the local level - we'll never have the pedestrian-oriented stations and town centers of Europe when the majority of population lives in anti-pedestrian, low-density subdivisions. But there's no reason rail has to be dependent on pedestrian environments. Stations can be built in an auto-oriented form just as easily. Plus, we've got pedestrian environments around most rail stations - they're called Main Street (usually).
__________________
la forme d'une ville change plus vite, hélas! que le coeur d'un mortel...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 1:33 PM
10023's Avatar
10023 10023 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 11,307
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
Throw this in the face of anybody who says rail won't work in the US because we're just not dense enough.
See my prior post. Rail funded at the federal level doesn't work because of our political system. Any good rail system would need to be funded and built at the state level (or by a partnership of neighboring states). The problem is that states don't generally have the money for that.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2012, 8:17 PM
Young Gun's Avatar
Young Gun Young Gun is offline
Man on a mission
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Harrisburg PA
Posts: 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonboy1983 View Post
Haven't you heard? Bedford, Breezwood, Carlisle, and the rest of the lower Susquehanna River Valley are banding together to form an up-and-coming urbanized area!!


actually Harrisburg, York, Lancaster are very gradually growing into a single metropolitan area. The Harrisburg MSA includes Carlisle
__________________
Dream Tall
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2012, 8:20 PM
Young Gun's Avatar
Young Gun Young Gun is offline
Man on a mission
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Harrisburg PA
Posts: 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
See my prior post. Rail funded at the federal level doesn't work because of our political system. Any good rail system would need to be funded and built at the state level (or by a partnership of neighboring states). The problem is that states don't generally have the money for that.
Most states in the NE Corridor has something, some is regional, some state; I'm thing Septa, NJ Transit, etc.
__________________
Dream Tall
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
   
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 3:40 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.