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  #21  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 2:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Poutine is not a national delicacy, it's a national disgrace!
I would not call it a disgrace but I am concure on the fact that it's not a fency diner but it doesn't claim to be by any stretch of the imagination.

By the way, Poutine is, first and foremost, a national thing.... in Quebec.
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  #22  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 3:15 PM
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Originally Posted by vid View Post
How are hot dogs unique to Montreal? I've never heard of a Montreal hot dog.
Though lesser-known than Montreal bagels and smoked meat, Montreal hot dogs are also a part of the culinary tradition of this city. Montreal Pool Room has been serving them for more than a century and is probably the most famous of all. It is just a variety of hot dogs among many.
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  #23  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 3:17 PM
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Hot dogs are the ubiquitous street meat of Toronto. Until recently, they were the only street food allowed by law.
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  #24  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 3:56 PM
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Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
Though lesser-known than Montreal bagels and smoked meat, Montreal hot dogs are also a part of the culinary tradition of this city. Montreal Pool Room has been serving them for more than a century and is probably the most famous of all. It is just a variety of hot dogs among many.
they call them steamers or steamies don't they?
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  #25  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 4:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
Can't we have a dish that actually tastes good?
Or can we have a dish that we can actually look at without having nausea.
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  #26  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 4:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Vaillant View Post
let's feed ourselves with poutine every days for a year and see what happen...
Nothing significant if you use decent ingredients.

Cheese curd can be a decent dairy. Potato is a reasonable starch and can be fried in light oils or sake. Thicken the gravy with potato instead of wheat and consume in small quantities.

Now, add a leafy salad with a thin vinegrette type dressing.

It's actually a pretty reasonable meal.


Eat poutine exclusively for a couple months from a major fast food vendor and you will have severe problems.
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  #27  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 4:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amor de cosmos View Post
they call them steamers or steamies don't they?
Yes, or "steamés" in French.
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  #28  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 4:44 PM
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Love all the snobs in this thread. Poutine rocks.
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  #29  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 4:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Poutine is not a national delicacy, it's a national disgrace!
Poutine a national disgrace!?

We're talking about Quebec poutine, not Acadian poutine -- the latter appearing as though it's a slimmy ball of regurgitated bread.
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  #30  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 5:07 PM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Winnipeg: nips
I just learned this the other day, apparently that name came about due to anti-German sentiment during WW1. "Hamburger" sounded too German, so Winnipeggers started calling them "nips" instead (which is funny when you think of the players in WW2...). It was a generic term applied to all hamburgers until Salisbury House began using the name for all of their burgers. I was shocked that it took me nearly 40 years to learn this after living in Winnipeg for nearly 30 - I had to learn this from a history book about Alberta, of all places. And so far, every single 'pegger that I ask is unaware of this. So much for our cultural identities being well known.

Poutine is at this point much more than a Quebec thing. It's something recognized country-wide as a uniquely "Canadian" food, and internationally a lot of people are aware of this too. It's become routine for me to take international visitors for poutine - and most of them have heard about it before coming here, it's one of the first "Canadian" things they want to do.

I figure if Banff ever opened a poutinerie, they'd make millions.
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  #31  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 5:12 PM
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A poutine restaurant has opened in Edmonton, and it is positively spectacular!

http://la-poutine.com/
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  #32  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 6:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post
How are hot dogs unique to Montreal? I've never heard of a Montreal hot dog.
Its aboslutely nasty, or sublime, depending on your tastes. A Montreal hot dog (better known as un steamé) is steamed, not grilled, and is topped off with onions, coleslaw, and mustard).
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  #33  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 8:08 PM
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Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Montreal has no claim to poutine, it's a Quebec-wide thing and I'm pretty sure it originated from somewhere else in the province. It's only really smoked meat and bagels that Montreal can claim as uniquely Montreal.

Smoked meat yes Bagels not so much. NYC also is known for bagels.
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  #34  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 11:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post
How are hot dogs unique to Montreal? I've never heard of a Montreal hot dog.
You're joking, right? Hardly unique to Montreal, but a steamé all-dressed is classic Montreal fast food.

As for poutine, I am pleased to say I've never been tempted. My arteries are very grateful!
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  #35  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 11:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrewjm3D View Post
Smoked meat yes Bagels not so much. NYC also is known for bagels.
Oh oh, I see a Montreal bagel versus New York City bagel exchange coming up! I prefer the Montreal variety, even if it is a bit sweet.
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  #36  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 11:13 PM
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To be a national dish you need uniformity. Aside from regional differences it's hard to get good poutine outside Quebec 90% of it is crap. I would vote for the butter tart as you can usually track a good one down in any town or city.
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  #37  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 11:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freeweed View Post
Poutine is at this point much more than a Quebec thing. It's something recognized country-wide as a uniquely "Canadian" food, and internationally a lot of people are aware of this too. It's become routine for me to take international visitors for poutine - and most of them have heard about it before coming here, it's one of the first "Canadian" things they want to do.

I figure if Banff ever opened a poutinerie, they'd make millions.
Ten years ago, hardly anyone outside of Québec had ever heard of poutine. Now a U.S. fast food chain is touting it as 'Canada's National Food'?

Dubious...
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  #38  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 11:26 PM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Oh oh, I see a Montreal bagel versus New York City bagel exchange coming up! I prefer the Montreal variety, even if it is a bit sweet.
They're 2 completely different beasts! New York bagels are big, doughy and salty. Montréal bagels are small, crispy and sweet.

Montrealers can argue for hours with New Yorkers over bagel supremacy then continue arguing amongst themselves over St-Viateur vs Fairmont!

Last edited by The Gibbroni; Apr 28, 2012 at 11:48 PM.
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  #39  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2012, 11:53 PM
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Originally Posted by osmo View Post
To be a national dish you need uniformity. Aside from regional differences it's hard to get good poutine outside Quebec 90% of it is crap. I would vote for the butter tart as you can usually track a good one down in any town or city.
This was the glorp we were presented with in New Brunswick. The fish was superb but the fries/brown stuff/cubed mozza was not poutine!!
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  #40  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2012, 12:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Rico Rommheim View Post
Its aboslutely nasty, or sublime, depending on your tastes. A Montreal hot dog (better known as un steamé) is steamed, not grilled, and is topped off with onions, coleslaw, and mustard).
Standard fare when I go to a show at Metropolis or Club Soda. Stop by the Pool Room for 3 all dressed and a drink or 2+fries and drink for 5$ and change. (89.50$ at the Bell)


Poutine isn't bad either


Pool room has been selling them for 100 years!
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