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  #1  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 5:56 PM
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hkskyline's 2012 in NANJING

Having enjoyed wonderful weather in Shanghai during the week, payback time came during the weekend with clouds and rain. Struggling to find a dry place to visit so the whole weekend would not be a write-off, my only option was to head west. Nanjing was only about an hour away from Shanghai by high-speed train, and sun was forecasted to peek out during the day while the rest of the Yangtze River Delta would continue to rain. 135 yuan later, I was all set for the 300km day trip!

The Presidential Palace dates from the Taiping Rebellion during the Qing Dynasty. The facility was used as the presidential ofices by the republic government after the Qing was overthrown. While the architecture is fairly basic, it has historic significance as this is probably the only place in mainland China where the Nationalist colours and logos are freely on display.













The palace is roughly divided into 3 vertical axes, with this section being the central axis.



The interior decorations have been kept to resemble the early days of Nationalist China, including the portrait of Dr. Sun Yat-sen on the wall.



Historic relics are on display in the various buildings that make up the palace.





















This is a bond that was issued to help with the war effort. The coupons below would be exchangeable for money.































The architecture is nothing interesting, but the artifacts and exhibits more than compensate.



The government offices in those days were quite spacious.







Nanjing's first elevator was installed in this building.





































Dr. Sun Yat-sen is the founding father of modern China, leading the rebellion against the imperial Qing dynasty. Being such a famous person, I was not surprised to find his face on a number of products.







The Taiping rebellion in the mid-19th century highlighted instability within the Qing dynasty. The rebellion was organized by Christian rebels, who believed their leader was chosen by God to replace the corrupt Qing. They took control of Nanjing and redecorated the palace.







For a Christian rebellion, this doesn't look anything like it.



















Leaving the Taiping times, there are more modern buildings with restored rooms.











The guards' room.





The full set : http://www.globalphotos.org/nanjing.htm
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  #2  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 7:57 PM
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Very fascinating. So different than the usual communist propaganda. Thanks for sharing.
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  #3  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 9:22 PM
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Awesome.
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Old Posted Jan 18, 2013, 1:45 AM
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Thank you. A wonderful day trip and tour!
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  #5  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 1:22 PM
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Ming Xiaoling is the burial site of the Ming Dynasty's first emperor. However, subsequent Ming emperors were buried in Beijing. This 14th century tomb features a spiritual path lined with statues of animals that serve as guardians.















There weren't many signs to get to the tomb, and I got lost a few times within the park. Upon finding a map on a sign, I took this snap, hoping it would come in handy later.











































Dr. Sun Yat-sen died in Beijing in 1925, and wanted to be buried in Nanjing. His mausoleum is perched on the hillsides near Ming Xiaoling, and can be reached after an ascent of 392 steps. Completed in 1929, it is now a must-see attraction in Nanjing, attracting hordes of tour groups that make the visit quite daunting. The sight of these uniform-coloured hats means stay away!













The Mausoleum is a blue and white building, designed after the colours of the Nationalist flag. A fairly short and orderly line starts on one side to enter the facility, where photos are not allowed.





Unfortunately, this mausoleum is not the place for peace and quiet. A huge tourist market was set up on the other side of the mausoleum, while the odd shop here and there can be found along the steps.





Buggies ferry visitors between the Mausoleum and Ming Xiaoling. It's a brisk 20 minute walk if you want to exercise.

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Old Posted Jan 22, 2013, 12:49 AM
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Fascinating stuff. As someone who grew up in Taiwan, seeing all that Nationalist memorabilia preserved in China is pretty surreal. I'm skeptical that those Kuomintang offices ever looked so pristine when they were in active use, but they certainly look beautiful now.
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Old Posted Jan 22, 2013, 4:33 AM
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^^^ Haha yeah I was going to say life looked pretty damn good in Nationalist China! Nice and clean with crisp linens and high class furnishings.

That park is awesome. Loved the stone statues, great looking place.
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Old Posted Jan 22, 2013, 9:23 AM
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It's interesting to see a Chinese city thread without the usual skyscrapers. Thanks for sharing the historical aspects of this old city. Considering its population of 7 or 8 million it is relatively little known in the west.
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  #9  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2013, 2:00 PM
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Thanks for all your support. Here's more :

Zhonghua Gate is the main entry point along the historic Nanjing city wall today. The walls date from the start of the Ming Dynasty in the 14th century, and were the most extensive in the world at the time. This is not a simple door in the wall. It is a reinforced defense structure, cemented by mortar frm glutinous rice, with gates within gates and chambers that can confuse and trap the enemy.









These holes are dug deep into the wall, where hundreds of soldiers can be held. As the enemy breaches the wall and enters the pit, the waiting soldiers are released to surround, trap, and terminate the invaders. What a tactical design!



























The original wall was 33km long, although much of it has survived.









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Old Posted Jan 26, 2013, 4:39 AM
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Qinhuai is the lifeblood of old Nanjing, and is now a major tourist area, with sightseeing boats, temples, and gardens clustered around it. Emerging from the subway station onto this leafy street, the sights are only a short walk away.







This gate marks the entrance to the Qinhuai tourist area. My first stop is the Zhanyuan Garden, just behind the gate.

































The lead-up to the Confucius Temple is a pedestrianized shopping street with traditional architecture on both sides. This is no longer original as plenty of cities throughout China have done the same already.





















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  #11  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2013, 3:35 PM
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Confucius Temple's current buildings date from the late 19th century, although the temple's history go back to the 11th century.











































The information board notes these are the only stone tablets from the Yuan Dynasty that have survived to today. That would make them some 700 years old. Yet the writing is still legible.





The exit is at the back of the temple, and another shopping street with traditional architecture follows. Some of the paintings look quite nice though.



























The full set : http://www.globalphotos.org/nanjing.htm
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  #12  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2013, 1:59 AM
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Wow. So many great sites here I haven't seen. And I've lived here! That's what having a full-time job does to your free time. Nanjing has some great 'Old China' feel if you just know where to look. Too bad most of it feels just like other Chinese cities though (new, crowded, and chaotic).

Great shots of a historic city that few people are even aware is an important place to visit while in China!
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