HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture > Never Built & Visionary Projects > Cancelled Project Threads Archive

 

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2013, 5:22 PM
sbarn sbarn is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 2,030
Smile NEW YORK | Concourse Village / The Bronx | FT | 2X 30 FLOORS

Not a part of New York reported on much, but Danois Architects have plans on their website for two 30-story buildings in the Concourse Village section of The Bronx. Not sure if this is still in the planning / proposal stage, or if this actually has a chance of moving forward. It would be great to see more development in The Bronx.







     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2013, 5:39 PM
babybackribs2314 babybackribs2314 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: UWS, Manhattan
Posts: 1,728
The Bronx has such an amazing amount of gorgeous pre-war housing stock. I think it'll become a solidly middle class neighborhood again as we head into the 2010s and 2020s, especially as it doesn't have the flooding issues (at least most of the borough doesn't) that plague BK and Queens. This infill is mundane but what you would expect for the area, and it's still an improvement over the other towers in the neighborhood.
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2013, 5:50 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 15,785
Quote:
Originally Posted by babybackribs2314 View Post
The Bronx has such an amazing amount of gorgeous pre-war housing stock. I think it'll become a solidly middle class neighborhood again as we head into the 2010s and 2020s, especially as it doesn't have the flooding issues (at least most of the borough doesn't) that plague BK and Queens.
I don't think flooding issues will play a role, but I do agree that the Bronx is getting more middle class, largely because of the excellent building stock.

The Grand Concourse is all quality construction, throughout its entire run through the Bronx. There are already many newcomers settling into lower Concourse prewar coops. One of my good friends, who is an Assistant Commissioner in NYC govt., just bought here, and he and his wife are expecting a baby, with the intention of this being their long-term residence.

These art deco coop buildings have fantastic bones. They often need to be renovated, but they're generally higher quality than average buildings in Brooklyn and Queens. Remember that the Grand Concourse was built as the "Jewish Park Avenue" in the 1920's and 30's, and, even during the worst years of the 70's, never declined to the same extent as other Bronx corridors.
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2013, 6:37 PM
NYC4Life's Avatar
NYC4Life NYC4Life is offline
The Time To Build Is Now
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Bronx, NYC
Posts: 3,004
This looks like a taller version of the recently built Boricua Village not far from here. The Bronx has many (like the rest of NYC) developments that never get their own threads, even on other sites like Wired NY.
__________________
"I want to wake up in the city that never sleeps"
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2013, 9:14 PM
babybackribs2314 babybackribs2314 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: UWS, Manhattan
Posts: 1,728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
I don't think flooding issues will play a role, but I do agree that the Bronx is getting more middle class, largely because of the excellent building stock.

The Grand Concourse is all quality construction, throughout its entire run through the Bronx. There are already many newcomers settling into lower Concourse prewar coops. One of my good friends, who is an Assistant Commissioner in NYC govt., just bought here, and he and his wife are expecting a baby, with the intention of this being their long-term residence.

These art deco coop buildings have fantastic bones. They often need to be renovated, but they're generally higher quality than average buildings in Brooklyn and Queens. Remember that the Grand Concourse was built as the "Jewish Park Avenue" in the 1920's and 30's, and, even during the worst years of the 70's, never declined to the same extent as other Bronx corridors.
You don't? The southern halves of both BK and Queens are vulnerable to flooding from hurricanes, check out the surge maps... Sandy was obviously bad, but if a storm comes in with 5ft more surge than Sandy--certainly plausible--it would have been far far worse and all of Southern BK & Queens would've looked like the Rockaways.
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2013, 9:22 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 15,785
Quote:
Originally Posted by babybackribs2314 View Post
You don't? The southern halves of both BK and Queens are vulnerable to flooding from hurricanes, check out the surge maps... Sandy was obviously bad, but if a storm comes in with 5ft more surge than Sandy--certainly plausible--it would have been far far worse and all of Southern BK & Queens would've looked like the Rockaways.
No, I don't. Sandy was the worst storm in history, and yet didn't really harm these neighborhoods in terms of real estate valuation.

And I'm not basing long-term real estate values on the absolute worst possible secenario, especially since the primary real estate issue related to Sandy in the prime neighborhoods like Lower Manhattan and Dumbo (important stuff in the basement destroyed) isn't going to be at issue with most landlords if it happens again.

People love to live near the waterfront, and with all the new parks and waterfront infrastructure, I think these areas are some of the best long-term real estate bets. Obviously the Rockaways and Jersey Shore suffered much worse damage, though, and have all those tiny bungalows that were destroyed in the storm, but those will be rebuilt to modern construction standards. Newer construction fared fine in Sandy.

I also like the Concourse area as a long-term bet, though, because the architecture and building quality is so terrific. You have big, prewar layouts, and really nice buildings. And there's great subway access to Manhattan, including express train service.

We'll see, though. Brooklyn and Queens obviously have much more gentrification at this point.
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2013, 4:47 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 36,724
These apartments were built over railyards.

Brief history...
http://www.startsandfits.com/?p=255

Here's a guide to the neighborhood...
http://www.bigapplegreeter.org/PDF/concoursVil_1.pdf



__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
     
     
End
 
 
 

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture > Never Built & Visionary Projects > Cancelled Project Threads Archive
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:32 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.