HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum

Since 1999, the SkyscraperPage Forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web. The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics. Welcome!

You are currently browsing as a guest. Register with the SkyscraperPage Forum and join this growing community of skyscraper enthusiasts. Registering has benefits such as fewer ads, the ability to post messages, private messaging and more.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Photography Forums > My City Photos

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted May 19, 2013, 3:58 PM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
HALIFAX, Canada's grand old city on the east coast

I went 'Down East' a few summers ago, but hadn't posted them here. I've updated some of the data to reflect 2013 and will add photos every few days:



QUICK FACTS

Halifax is the largest city on Canada's east coast and the capital of Nova Scotia.
Halifax: population 413,710 (12th largest in Canada)
Nova Scotia: population 921,727 (7th largest in Canada)

Canadian Prime Ministers who were from Nova Scotia: 3
Air distance between Halifax and Paris: 4881 km
Air distance between Halifax and Vancouver: 6168 km

Nova Scotia is latin for New Scotland.
The first documented Scottish settlement in America was here in 1621.
The flag reflects Nova Scotia's Scottish heritage. It is the inverse of the Scottish flag.



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ova-Scotia.jpg

Along with Virginia, Nova Scotia was one of England's most important colonies in America, but it was first settled by the French in 1604. At various times, Nova Scotia was considered part of New England, a French colony, an English colony, and finally a founding member of the Canadian nation.

I hope to offer a glimpse into this often over looked region of the world. Due to history and war, Nova Scotia has always been the most heavily militarized region of Canada and remains so today. It's a province of universities and colleges, blueberries, and giant pumpkins. It's a rugged land with lush inland valleys, isolated French communities, and one of the oldest African Canadian communities in the land. It's a culture tied to the sea in every way imaginable and where Canadian democracy began 250 years ago.

Unfortunately, I only made one day trip outside the capital, Halifax, but I hope you enjoy. (I've never taken photos before so be kind.)


****************************************************************

I've just crossed the Bay of Fundy, home of the highest tides in the world. From my airplane window I spot the eastern end of the Annapolis Valley, Cape Split, and the massive mudflats near the Town of Wolfville, home of Acadia University. At the other end of the Annapolis Valley sits historic Annapolis Royal. It was known as Port-Royal by the French until being renamed in 1710 by Britain. This is the second oldest continuously settled area (by Europeans) in North America after St. Augustine, Florida.


Stanfield International Airport in Halifax. It was named in honour of Robert Stanfield, former Premier of Nova Scotia. Stanfield has won many international awards of excellence. Here's testament to that.


Stanfield handled 3,605,701 passengers in 2012. Notable airlines servicing Stanfield are Air Canada, American, Continental, Delta, Icelandair, Northwest, Porter, United, and Westjet. It's not a big airport, but it's very well designed. Some more accolades.


I'm assuming this is a replica of one of Alexander Graham Bell's many inventions. Bell invented many things besides the telephone like this contraption hanging from the ceiling. Bell was a proud Nova Scotian. His museum is in Baddeck, Nova Scotia. It is also where he and his wife are buried.


Not pretty, but a sign that Halifax is prospering again. New parking facilities are being built next to the airport.


Aaaaahhhhhhh!!! The freshest air you're ever going to breathe. A very subtle hint of salt foreshadows the Atlantic Ocean 20 kilometres ahead.


I jumped out the back to take a photo of the cars behind me. OK, that is a lie.


The Nova Scotia forest finally gives way to the city. This is where I turned off. I'm staying in Clayton Park, a heavily wooded suburb that broke ground in the 1970's. I forgot how ruggedly beautiful it was here. Beautiful homes amongst the forest, deer, and breathtaking views of the city and Bedford Basin below. Only a photo of my off ramp, I'm afraid.


Halifax is a peninsula. There are suburbs off the peninsula, the City of Darmouth across the harbour, and Bedford at the end of the Bedford Basin. This basin is the second largest ice free natural harbour in the world after Sydney, Australia. My first excursion to the city core starts at South Park Street in downtown Halifax. These houses are typical Halifax peninsula homes.


I decide to head down University Avenue towards my old alma mater, Dalhousie University. Nova Scotia is home to a whopping 11 universities. Halifax alone, boasts 6 universities. Dalhousie is the second largest university in Atlantic Canada after Memorial University in St. John's. This shot is actually looking back at where I just walked from. There's a very large old church next to this building, so they made an effort to compliment the architecture of the church.


This is one of the first Dalhousie University buildings I come across. I'm not sure what it is. As you can see, University Avenue is quite a handsome street. It features a wide centre meridian that is lined with beautiful old trees and a well manicured lawn.


Just passed this building is the Faculty of Medicine. Dalhousie is known for its graduate programs. The school has the oldest student population in Canada due to the number of people who flock here to do their Master's or Doctorate's. Dalhousie Law School is probably the most prestigious of them all.


This is the Sir Charles Tupper Medical Building. It houses the main reference library for the Faculty of Medicine. Classes take place here as well. Tupper (July 2, 1821 – October 30, 1915) was a Canadian father of Confederation: as the Premier of Nova Scotia from 1864 to 1867, he led Nova Scotia into Confederation. He later went on to serve as the sixth Prime Minister of Canada in 1896, becoming the Canadian prime minister with the shortest term of office (69 days).


Opposite this courtyard is this building. I believe it is also part of the Faculty of Medicine. Not sure actually.


The next building down is Dalhousie Dentistry. In 1912 the Maritime Dental College joined Dalhousie and became the first Faculty of Dentistry at a Canadian university.


Here's a shot looking back down University Avenue. Here you can get a better look at the centre meridian that runs the length of the street.


Across from this is Fire Station #2.


I cross Robie Street and continue down University Avenue. Looking back, here's another shot of that station.


The Public Archives of Nova Scotia.


We enter the heart of Dalhousie University's campus. Dalhousie University is considered one of the "Canadian Ivies". The others are McGill University, the University of Western Ontario, Queen's University, and the University of Toronto. In recent years, the University of British Columbia has also been labeled so. Dalhousie University is also a G13 school. The G13 represent the leading research intensive schools in the country.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Ivies
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Group_o...n_universities)


MANY MORE PHOTOS TO COME! STAY TUNED.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams

Last edited by isaidso; May 19, 2013 at 4:28 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted May 19, 2013, 5:26 PM
Marty_Mcfly's Avatar
Marty_Mcfly Marty_Mcfly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: St. John's, NL
Posts: 1,858
Looking good! I've always enjoyed Halifax
__________________
"What can be asserted without proof can be dismissed without proof."
-Christopher Hitchens
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted May 19, 2013, 5:31 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador
Posts: 13,953
I can't wait to see the rest! I hope you have lots from Granville Street and areas of downtown that show density? I haven't been in Halifax in years and there's not much of it to see on SSP.

They still have banners up at Stanfield for awards they won almost a decade ago? Seems weird, like a high school, if they're not VERY recent... shouldn't those be on a wall somewhere or something?

Love this shot of peninsula homes:

http://i453.photobucket.com/albums/q...g?t=1223530739
__________________
I vow to thee, my country - all earthly things, above; entire, and whole, and perfect - the service of my love.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted May 19, 2013, 6:36 PM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
My trip was about 5 years ago now, so the photos aren't exactly current. It seems that display their airport awards over the years the way sports teams do for pennants, divisional titles, etc. I'll save downtown till last.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted May 19, 2013, 6:41 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador
Posts: 13,953
Nnnooo! Hahaha... I want to see so badly. Especially Granville. We have our own equivalents of Barrington, etc. But we don't have a Granville in St. John's.
__________________
I vow to thee, my country - all earthly things, above; entire, and whole, and perfect - the service of my love.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted May 19, 2013, 7:19 PM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
I do have a few of Granville.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted May 20, 2013, 5:52 PM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
Venturing further into the heart of the campus.

This is the new home of the Faculty of Computer Science which resulted from the amalgamation of the former School of Computer Science at the Technical University of Nova Scotia (TUNS) and the computer science division of the Department of Math, Stats and Computer Science at Dalhousie University on April 1, 1997. TUNS was a downtown Halifax university that is now part of Dalhousie University.



Next is the Kenneth C. Rowe Management Building. Rowe is a Halifax industrialist from the aerospace sector. This is the principle building of the Faculty of Management's School of Business Administration. I spent 4 years here, but in the crappy former building which has since been demolished.



Here's the Weldon Law Building, home to the prestigious Dalhousie Law School. My first boyfriend studied here: a German-Canadian from Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. Lunenburg has World Heritage Site designation and is home of the Bluenose schooner which appears on the Canadian dime.



The Dalhouse Arts Centre which houses the Rebecca Cohn Auditorium. The Dalhousie Arts Centre grew from the seed of a bequest from Rebecca Cohn. Cohn was a Polish immigrant who came to Canada with her husband in 1906. Perseverant and intelligent, the Cohns prospered in Halifax. Money was bestowed on Dalhousie upon her death in 1942.



The Student Union Building is affectionately referred to simply as "The SUB". The Dalhousie book store is downstairs. The building houses the Dalhousie pub called the Grawood, a cafeteria, a student lounge, offices, student services, and is ground zero for FROSH WEEK. That's what orientation week is called at Dal. Nova Scotians tend to say "Dal" rather than Dalhousie. Dalhousie is home to many fraternities and sororities all located close to, or on campus.



University Avenue comes to an end. No cars beyond this point. Dalhousie University is Canada's 5th oldest university. Canada's oldest universities:

1. University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick (1785)
2. University of King's College, Halifax, Nova Scotia (1789)
3. Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (1802)
4. University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI (1804)
5. Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (1818)
5. College Universitaire de St. Boniface, Winnipeg, Manitoba (1818)

* Universite Laval was founded in 1852, but it's predecessor the Seminaire de Quebec was founded in 1663.



Dalhousie College was a non-denominational university founded by General George Ramsay, 9th Earl of Dalhousie, the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia. Using money acquired from the duties collected during the occupation of parts of Maine in the War of 1812, Ramsay established Dalhousie as a college open to all people regardless of class or creed. At the laying of the cornerstone on May 22, 1820, Lord Dalhousie said that this University was "founded on the principles of religious tolerance." Dalhousie remained one of only three universities founded on secular constitutional premises until as late as the 1950s.

In the distance is the nerve centre of Dalhousie University, the Henry Hicks Academic Building. This was formerly known as the Arts and Administration building, but was renamed in 2002 in honour of a former President of Dalhousie. The older section of the campus is done in the same architectural style: Georgian.



To the immediate right sits Dalhousie's largest library. It is called the Killam Memorial Library. With more than half a million books and 25,000 journals in the Humanities, Sciences, Social Sciences, Education and Management, the Killam library is the largest academic library in the Maritimes.

I wish I had remembered to go inside. There is a massive square atrium in the centre complete with water features, foliage, a coffee shop, and a curtain of glass all the way to the top. It's done in a similar brutalist style. I've always been very fond of this structure. It anchors this area of the campus superbly.



I continue forward past some construction. Looks like they are building some new walkways in a diagonal pattern. Long over due, but better late than never.

__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams

Last edited by isaidso; May 20, 2013 at 6:05 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted May 20, 2013, 6:06 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is offline
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 14,607
Great photos. I remember the old management building; it was really weird. They tore it down around the time when these photos were taken, and now there's a new building on that site.

Quote:
Opposite this courtyard is this building. I believe it is also part of the Faculty of Medicine. Not sure actually.
This is the Forrest Building. It was once the main building for Dalhousie.

Do you have pictures of the Chase (math) and Dunn (physics) buildings?
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted May 20, 2013, 9:03 PM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
Great photos. I remember the old management building; it was really weird. They tore it down around the time when these photos were taken, and now there's a new building on that site.

This is the Forrest Building. It was once the main building for Dalhousie.

Do you have pictures of the Chase (math) and Dunn (physics) buildings?
Thank you and nice to finally know about the Forrest Building. I've passed by it hundreds of times, but knew nothing about it. The old School of Management looked more like a re-purposed church than anything else. What's there now and which building is Chase? They seem to have renamed a few buildings since I was at Dal. I do have photos of the Dunn building, but will post those later.

GO TIGERS!
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted May 20, 2013, 10:53 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is offline
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 14,607
The old management building was very strange. Part of it was indeed an old church, and then there was a 5 or 6 storey concrete addition next to it that was built in the 60's or 70's. It was unusually undersized, with lower than usual ceilings and tiny hallways.

The new building on that site is called the Mona Campbell Building:


https://www.facebook.com/pages/Fowle...e/231114633876

The Chase building is the one with the large balcony on one side and the curved facade on the other. Here's a tiny picture of it: http://www.mscs.dal.ca/chasebuilding.JPG
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted May 21, 2013, 3:08 AM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
Makes you wonder how many years all those detached turn of the century houses have before they're cleared for modern university buildings. It's for the best, and I'm hoping they one day close some of those side streets to cars completely and make the campus more closed off.

There's really no need to have all of them open to car traffic especially as almost all of the buildings are university owned. It's not as if private residents need to access their driveway. Even University Avenue could stop at Robie or just a block or two into campus.

The campus is already one of the best, but there's still room for improvement.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted May 21, 2013, 10:16 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador
Posts: 13,953
I love this:

http://i453.photobucket.com/albums/q...g?t=1223531374

The scenery in all of the Dalhousie shots is great but what I like about this one is the position of the tree line in relation to the sidewalk. In the others, the sidewalk is closest to the road, with the tree line between it and the buildings.

In the shot above, it's switched. That reminds me of Winnipeg's older residential neighbourhoods, which are by far the best thing about that city.
__________________
I vow to thee, my country - all earthly things, above; entire, and whole, and perfect - the service of my love.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted May 22, 2013, 5:22 PM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
I agree, it's usually far nicer to have trees between the sidewalk and the street to shield pedestrians.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted May 24, 2013, 5:39 PM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
More Dalhousie University:

To the left is this barricade. It looks suspiciously like remnants of a former Georgian building. You can easily spot where one of the windows once was. It showed foresight that they kept this important marker and recognized the importance of historical consideration.



This is the Chemistry building.



Here's another shot of the Chemistry building a little further up. Dalhousie University certainly impresses architecturally. University buildings and campuses historically have been designed to stimulate the mind. Dalhousie provides this in spades.



I continue on towards the Arts and Administration building. I'll refer to it as that since I can't get used to that new name, Henry Hicks. I could have spent all day lying on that lawn reading and contemplating, but I had many photos still to take and the sun was beginning to sit low in the sky.



The MacDonald Library, my favourite building on campus. Unfortunately, I never had reason to spend time in here when I was a student. At night the rooms inside would be lit and I remember walking by many evenings admiring the beauty of its interior. It's a charming place to curl up with an old book on a crisp Nova Scotian autumn.



On the lawn in front of the MacDonald library sits this plaque. Those lands described were eventually lost to the USA and are in present day Maine.



Opposite the MacDonald library is the University Club. The building opened in January, 1922. It had a student common room, lecture rooms, faculty offices, a Great Hall, and an office for the school newspaper called the Gazette. Dalhousie's campus newspaper was founded in 1868, making it the oldest student newspaper in Canada and one of the oldest continuously-running student newspapers in America.

University Club was occupied by Arts until 1952. The Law School called the University Club home from then until it moved to its new building in 1967. Today the University Club is still the base of the Faculty Club; the Earl of Dalhousie Pub is in the basement, meeting rooms are on the first floor, and the Great Hall on the second floor is used for university and membership special events.



MacDonald library on the right, the Arts and Administration building on the left.



The Arts and Administration building.



The building is shaped like a "U". Each wing is identical. Here's one wing.



The back end of the same building.



Another shot. The A&A building on the left, the MacDonald library in the distance.



Looking back towards University Avenue from the steps of the A&A building.



The Dalhousie crest perched on top of the clock tower. Dal is a very serious school. Among universities in America, only Harvard, Yale, Princeton, McGill and the University of Toronto boast more Rhodes Scholars than Dalhousie.



A glimpse of Studley Field can be seen between the A&A building and the University Club.



JOIN ME LATER AS I CONTINUE ON MY JOURNEY TO STUDLEY FIELD, THE UNIVERSITY OF KING'S COLLEGE, AND BACK TO DOWNTOWN HALIFAX!!
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted May 24, 2013, 8:39 PM
DLLB DLLB is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Penticton, BC
Posts: 2,196
Great shots.

Some of the pictures also remind me of some of the older residential parts of the ole Peg (Winnipeg) near the Assiniboine River.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted May 29, 2013, 4:36 AM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
The Dalhousie Tiger emblazoned in the middle of Studley Field.





Studley Field bleachers. Dalhousie has 14 varsity teams including men’s and women’s teams in cross country, soccer, track and field, basketball, hockey, volleyball and swimming. Football is the one big sport noticeably absent from the list. The team was disbanded after the 1976 season due to budget cuts.



Dalhousie competes in the AUS Conference. There are 3 other Conferences in Canada representing Quebec, Ontario, and western Canada. Since 1990, the Dalhousie Tigers have brought home 127 AUS championships and 5 Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) team championships.

During the 2007-08 varsity season the Tigers captured six AUS championships including: men’s cross country, men’s volleyball, men’s swimming, women’s swimming, men’s track and field, and women’s track and field. Dalhousie also has dozens of intramural and club sports, from rock climbing and rugby to field hockey and sailing.



Looking back toward the main campus from Studley Field.



Another shot looking Dalhousie Chemistry head on. The Maple Leaf flies proudly above.



I walk across campus towards the University of King's College. One last Dalhousie building before we depart. This is the Dunn Building.



The Sir James Dunn Science Building was named in honour of Sir James Dunn, who graduated from the Law school in 1898. When he died in 1956, his widow was interested in using the funds of the Sir James Dunn Foundation to support the Law school; Lady Dunn was advised that her money would be most useful in funding a building for Physics, Engineering and Geology.



That door deserves a close up.



I say farewell to the Black and Gold; Dalhousie University.

__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted May 30, 2013, 5:30 AM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is offline
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 14,607
I've always liked the University Club. It is simple and elegant. A lot of public buildings in Halifax are like that; they're more Georgian than Victorian. Province House is the best example.

The stone foundation next to the University Club used to be the education building. It was torn down in the 90's. It would be nice if one day a stone building were rebuilt in that location to roughly mirror the Chem building and MacDonald library.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted May 30, 2013, 7:34 AM
Architype's Avatar
Architype Architype is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 5,583
Great photos of Hali and Dal. As someone who lived there once upon a time, I can appreciate them with nostalgia.
__________________
"You can not stop the spread of an idea by passing a law against it."- Harry S. Truman
Photography - Canada East & West | Vancouver BC | St. John's NL
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2013, 9:59 AM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
Thanks. As I moved away 12 years ago, they're nostalgic for me too.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2013, 10:00 AM
isaidso isaidso is online now
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 6,247
Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
The stone foundation next to the University Club used to be the education building. It was torn down in the 90's. It would be nice if one day a stone building were rebuilt in that location to roughly mirror the Chem building and MacDonald library.
I remember the Education Building now! For some reason I had it in my mind that the building was taken down many years before I went there.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
   
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Photography Forums > My City Photos
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 8:23 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.