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  #1  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2014, 11:30 PM
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Small Houses

Quote:
A Cabin so Small it Doesn’t Even Require a Permit

Dec 20, 2013



In 2010, Finnish designer Robin Falck wanted to build a place he could call his own. While hiking in the woods he found a beautiful location for a cabin. With mandatory military service coming up in less than a year, he knew he didn’t have time to build anything substantial that would require a permit. In Finland, you are allowed to build a small dwelling without a permit if it’s less than 96 – 128 square feet (depending on the location).

After designing the building during the winter months, Robin set out in June to build his cabin using as much locally sourced and recycled material as he could find. All building materials were carried in by hand and it took him two weeks to build. Falck estimates the cost somewhere around $10,500 (not including his own labour).
http://twistedsifter.com/2013/12/cab...y-robin-falck/












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  #2  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2014, 11:36 PM
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Quote:
Architect Builds Tiny 196 Square-Foot Dream House From Scratch

by Lucy Wang, 12/03/13



Cash-strapped Idaho architect Macy Miller wanted a place of her own without the burdensome mortgage, so she decided to build a tiny house from the ground up. Miller says the idea of building a micro home came to her in a dream in 2011, and she's doggedly pursued the vision ever since. She put the finishing touches on her tiny 196 square-foot home early last month - read on for a look inside!

Dissatisfied by the lack of construction training at school, Miller seized upon the DIY design/build dream as both an educational and cash-saving opportunity. It wasn’t until she began researching, however, that she discovered the expansive online tiny dweller community. “Once I started talking to people who were curious about the same things as me, I got more confident that it is possible and that it is the right path for me,” she writes on her website MiniMotives.
http://inhabitat.com/architect-build...-from-scratch/














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  #3  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2014, 11:49 PM
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i love this trend/way-of-doing-things. the constraint of small size forces elegant design solutions.
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  #4  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2014, 1:34 AM
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That, and I like the simplicity that it enforces. But I'm mostly just attracted to the prospect of housing that is reasonably affordable.
















http://imgur.com/gallery/yrkkA
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  #5  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2014, 1:39 AM
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Quote:
Architecture Student in China Builds 75 Sq. Ft. Tiny House

by Alex Pino on April 24, 2013


When an architecture student in China became frustrated with his dorm room he decided to design and build his own 75 sq. ft. tiny house.

It’s a micro home that somehow packs a kitchen, bathroom, laundry room, and patio. Hard to imagine at just 75-square-feet.
http://tinyhousetalk.com/china-stude...ft-tiny-house/




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  #6  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2014, 9:55 PM
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This Japanese house for a man and his rabbit(look closely at section) has always fascinated me. Quite extreme, to say the least.


http://www.cumbu.com/wp-content/uplo...01-588x745.jpg


http://www.cumbu.com/wp-content/uplo...06-588x749.jpg


http://www.architecturenewsplus.com/.../g/nmgwm9x.jpg


http://www.architecturenewsplus.com/.../g/nagbasg.jpg


More pictures and description on architect's webpage:
http://www.hosakatakeshi.com/english...ehouse_en.html
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  #7  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2014, 12:23 AM
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Tumbleweed Tiny House Company. They design and sell portable homes ranging from 117-172 sqft, which are sold at prices between $57,000-$66,000. Here are a few of their models:



Elm - 117 sqft.

















Cypress - 144 sqft.















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  #8  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2014, 12:33 AM
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They also have designs for larger, permanent dwellings, which range in size from 261 sqft. to 884 sqft. They don't sell them as pre-fab structures, but the have estimated material costs ranging from $22,500 to $58,000.



Z-glass - 370 sqft.







Whidbey - 461 sqft.

















B-53 - 777 sqft.





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Old Posted Jan 10, 2014, 5:08 AM
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When you price out labor for their bigger homes though with better quality materials like real wood floors, granite counters, better windows... the costs are pretty comparable to a regular home.

You only get good value from their larger homes if they are built in cheaper areas and you select cheaper finishes and stuff. Of course, I feel that longevity is important. But if you plan to buy one of the bigger models and plunk it in a big city, you're better off settling for a spacious condo.

Regardless, I love their designs. I prefer smaller spaces and a streamlined lifestyle.
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  #10  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2014, 1:22 AM
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Old Posted Jan 18, 2014, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kool maudit View Post
i love this trend/way-of-doing-things. the constraint of small size forces elegant design solutions.
Not always.

Sometimes it's just a shitty, little house.



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  #12  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2014, 5:30 AM
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I'm reminded of the 300 sqft. "Little House" in Toronto, which was on the market a few years ago for $180,000.




http://www.thelittlehouse.ca/



And then there was this 189 sqft. POS that sold for $165,000 a little while ago:


http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/09...n_3908797.html



A few more little homes about town:


http://www.tobuilt.ca/php/tobuilding...earch_fd3=3043




http://spacing.ca/toronto/2013/02/13...f-craven-road/


http://tinyhouseblog.com/tiny-house/...and-the-green/
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Old Posted Jan 29, 2014, 11:01 PM
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Quote:
In Madrid, A Tiny Apartment Transformed Into A Surprisingly Livable Home

By Jillian Wong, 11 Dec 2013


This apartment in Madrid is so narrow that it measures less than seven-feet-wide, which is smaller than a parking space. Most people would balk at the thought of living in such a tiny space but a team of architects from MYCC has managed to make it surprisingly livable by taking inspiration from vertical layouts of old video games.

Its extremely tall walls measuring over 16 feet meant the interior had to be designed around the unusual dimensions, resulting in a vertical view.

Upon entering, visitors walk into the kitchen and down some stairs into the living room. A ladder leads to the study area, and a separate set of stairs leads to the bedroom. The bathroom is accessed through a third and final set of stairs.
http://designtaxi.com/news/362621/In...-Livable-Home/










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Old Posted Jan 29, 2014, 11:06 PM
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Quote:
An Incredibly Fun Madrid Apartment Full Of Hidden Compartments And Trap Doors

By Jillian Wong, 28 Jan 2014



It seems Madrid is a hot spot for innovative microapartments. On the heels of a surprisingly livable tiny apartment smaller than a parking garage comes a similar apartment that has secret compartments and trap doors everywhere.

Located in an attic, it features a table, a bookcase, a hammock, a swing, and a disco ball that magically lower from the ceiling with the twist of a wall handle. Transparent panels that slide along rails allow different rooms to be created, enabling the kitchen to be separated from the living room or the creation of an additional guest room.

The second level contains trap doors that utilize the spaces between the wooden beams–the bathroom floor contains storage space while the bedroom is host to a secret tea room. Most ingeniously, a trap door in the floor opens up to reveal a dressing table containing a mirror on the back, with the empty table space creating a ‘seat’.

All the furniture is cleverly concealed and the walls were designed such that they are easy to push aside to make more space, making it a perfect fit for the owner’s lifestyle, a DJ who loves throwing parties.
http://designtaxi.com/news/363360/An...nd-Trap-Doors/
















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Old Posted Jan 29, 2014, 11:11 PM
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Quote:
An Incredibly Narrow House Cleverly Designed To Look & Feel Much Bigger

By Dorothy Tan, 27 Nov 2013


In Nada, Japan, Fujiwarramuro Architects has designed an incredibly narrow house that sits on a tiny site measuring just 36.95 square meters, which has managed to look beautiful and feel surprisingly spacious.

In addition to a central light well that runs through the three-story house, the architects have also installed see-through, drainboard-like floorboards that allow sunlight to infuse the entire interior from top to bottom.

These gaps in the floors also open up the visual field and reduce awareness of the spatial constraints, preventing the sensation of being boxed in.
http://designtaxi.com/news/362389/An...l-Much-Bigger/
















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Old Posted Jan 29, 2014, 11:55 PM
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I have to wonder exactly how livable these places are, especially when they're not perfectly staged for (often wide angle) architectural shoots. How does the regular stuff that fills up life (laundry comes to mind) Are there any confessionals/stories/blogs that detail the lives of those that have spent a considerable amount of time (let's say 6+ months) in one of these?
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Old Posted Jan 30, 2014, 5:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M.R.Victor View Post
I have to wonder exactly how livable these places are, especially when they're not perfectly staged for (often wide angle) architectural shoots. How does the regular stuff that fills up life (laundry comes to mind) Are there any confessionals/stories/blogs that detail the lives of those that have spent a considerable amount of time (let's say 6+ months) in one of these?
I grew up in a single-wide trailer, which is the poor man's small house -- literally. It was horrible. I also had cousins who lived in a trailer. Inexplicably, one bedroom had a door to the hall and another to the bathroom, but it was physically impossible to arrange a bed in that room so that you'd have access to both doors. At our place, meanwhile, I remember that in my brother's room you could stand with arms outstretched and touch both walls. We had to store a lot of stuff at my grandmother's house, where it would acquire the smell of wood smoke, and at my dad's garage, where the rats would chew on it and piss and shit all over it.

I honestly don't see how life's going to work in one of these trendy "small houses." These are tarted up sheds, and that one in Madrid, the one that seems to have been stolen from someone's dream of a funhouse, is just begging for trouble. All squatting and kneeling and whatnot... let's see what happens when the occupant sprains something and can't access a damn thing in the house anymore because of that.
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Old Posted Jan 30, 2014, 5:58 AM
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Well that's part of the idea - simplifying. Having less "stuff". Most of these are designed for single occupants anyway, cramming a wardrobe into any of these shouldn't be too challenging. Not that this is ever going to be widely desirable thing of course - though millions already do it all the same. I see enough ads for 100-200 sqft. apartments here going for like $800/month. The key difference with the stuff being shown here is that it's actually well designed, making the most efficient use of the space possible. That 75 sqft. concept home posted above for example, looks more livable than just about any of those 200 sqft. dumps I see advertised on Craigslist.
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Old Posted Feb 9, 2014, 8:01 AM
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I really like the trend towards well-designed, small living. Not everything I see is great, but it's nice to see people experimenting and coming up with interesting design solutions. A lot of these tiny homes are really only usable for a single person or couple. Having recently had a child, it would be nice to see more work on small homes for small families.
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Old Posted Feb 23, 2014, 4:57 AM
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Quote:
Three smart designs that make the most out of small spaces

Alex Bozikovic
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 21 2014, 5:00 PM EST
Last updated Friday, Feb. 21 2014, 11:50 AM EST


From empty nesters to first-time homeowners, more and more Canadians are inhabiting tighter quarters. How to live stylishly in a compact space? Here are three seductively scaled-down residences making the most of every square foot.

Radically open in Ottawa


Disciplined digs in Gastown


Tricking the eye in Toronto

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/...939061/?page=1
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