HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum.

Since 1999, SkyscraperPage.com's forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web.  The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics.  SkyscraperPage.com also features unique skyscraper diagrams, a database of construction activity, and publishes popular skyscraper posters.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 12:15 AM
Tyler Xyroadia's Avatar
Tyler Xyroadia Tyler Xyroadia is offline
Architect Curmudgeon
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Arizona
Posts: 161
If we HAD saved "The Singer Building" what next?

The Singer Building:


Of all the great tragedies of the 60's Architectural Holocaust, the loss of the Singer Building stands apart as one of the most biting. It came so closed to being saved, and yet was ultimately destroyed despite the best efforts of the newly formed historical preservation society.

But…

What if history had been slightly different?
What if someone had come in at the 11th hour and purchased the building, saving it from destruction. What next?

The building was demolished in 1968 as Manhattan was entering into a long economic slump. How could the building have been made to be both profitable and economic WHILE maintaining ask much of the rich architectural history as possible?

Revamped office spaces?
Luxury Condos?
Perhaps some civic building, library or learning center?

Curious what the pontificators among us may consider.
__________________
"God damn modern architect's and their Brtualism, and 'realism' and damn concrete boxes. Why I remember back when buildings had STYLE back when you would have real ARTISTS working away both inside and out!
"Um, aren't you like barely 30?"
"Thats not the point you damn whipper snapper!"
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 1:45 PM
MolsonExport's Avatar
MolsonExport MolsonExport is offline
The Vomit Bag.
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Liver & Onions
Posts: 20,755
Condos from a 21st century vantage-point, but I suppose there wasn't much demand for condos/apartments in the 1960s-era financial district, nor much of a history of repurposing office towers.

I too lament the wanton destruction of these beauties, and rank the Singer (and Penn Station) as perhaps the most egregious examples. Also the NY World building and the rest of newspaper row (below):

wikipedia
__________________
There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don't know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don't know we don't know. -Donald Rumsfeld
Didn't you notice on the plane when you started talking, eventually I started reading the vomit bag?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 2:17 PM
uaarkson's Avatar
uaarkson uaarkson is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New York City
Posts: 1,734
New York World Building is definitely one of my all-time favorites. Such dreamy architecture.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 5:47 PM
ThatOneGuy's Avatar
ThatOneGuy ThatOneGuy is offline
Come As You Are
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Constanta
Posts: 818
"architectural holocaust"? Seriously?

People over-mystify these early century buildings so much, it's not even funny. There are plenty of buildings just like the ones in the above photo that nobody gives a shit about.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 6:08 PM
marvelfannumber1's Avatar
marvelfannumber1 marvelfannumber1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatOneGuy View Post
"architectural holocaust"? Seriously?

People over-mystify these early century buildings so much, it's not even funny. There are plenty of buildings just like the ones in the above photo that nobody gives a shit about.
There are also plenty of buildings in that photo that people DO give a shit about that are no more, just like there are several new buildings people don't give a shit about. Your point is what exactly? Anyways on to the topic at hand.


It's hard to say if the Singer building ever could have been saved in the '60s due to there not being much of a condo tower market back then. The only way I think it could have been saved was if someone bought the entire block and connected all the buildings togheter (forming some sort of mini-complex), or they would have demolished the rest of the block and built a modern office tower there.

As for today it would probably as said earlier be condos. Though I do ponder how 9/11 would have affected it if it was saved.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 11:16 PM
Tyler Xyroadia's Avatar
Tyler Xyroadia Tyler Xyroadia is offline
Architect Curmudgeon
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Arizona
Posts: 161
Looking into the history of other historical treasures that DID survive, I have noticed a trend.

Many of these buildings went through a "Decay and Rebirth" stage. Often they were used for low rent apartments, their insides falling apart and decaying.
Then as the Economy in NewYork picked up again in the 80's and 90's they start to be bought out and turned into Luxury Condo's.

In terms of trying to keep it "useful" I agree that tying it together with other near by buildings, mainly the City Investment Building and of course the Hudson Terminal.



Considering that these three buildings were cleared to make way for the World Trade centers, The best option I am thinking is buying out All Three Properties and redeveloping them into a massive linked Commercial Complex. That could allow you to have a unified space, and then, as the need for commercial space became truly high in the 70's, Perhaps, you could "Sacrifice" the smaller buildings in between those three for a large WTC office tower.
__________________
"God damn modern architect's and their Brtualism, and 'realism' and damn concrete boxes. Why I remember back when buildings had STYLE back when you would have real ARTISTS working away both inside and out!
"Um, aren't you like barely 30?"
"Thats not the point you damn whipper snapper!"
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:10 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.