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  #221  
Old Posted Oct 21, 2016, 4:47 PM
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India needs USD 1 trillion for housing, infra projects: Report
India tech spend in 100 smart cities to hit USD 2 bln

Narendra Modi’s 100 smart cities: Who will put money on table? What will happen to urban poor?
India becoming worlds new investment destination: Naidu
Investment in Smart Cities Mission will not be repented: Venkaiah

Smart Approach For Financing Smart Cities

Zero foreign investment till date in Modi’s smart cities mission
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“Foreign investment can’t flow just like that. It will come in the form of technology which is a difficult task. Municipalities and city leaders will need to come up with PPP projects where investors can come in after all approvals are in place. There is a deficit of such projects at the moment,” said Pratap Padode, Founder, Smart Cities Council India. The Council is a consortium of smart city practitioners and experts.
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While several countries have expressed keenness in the mission, only two MoUs have been signed till date. The US Trade and Development Agency (USTDA) inked an MoU for Vishakhapatnam, Allahabad and Ajmer, and the French Agency for Development signed a pact to assist Nagpur, Chandigarh and Oulgaret.
Smart City Project: Chandigarh signs MoU with French body
MP Chief Minister on UK visit to boost Smart Cities partnership
Pune: UK experts begin work on smart city solutions
Germany offers expertise for Smart Cities Mission
Swedish firms offering sustainable mobility to Smart Cities project: Envoy
Belgium firms keen on tie-ups for smart cities
Illinois partners with Telangana, India on smart state initiatives
India inks tech-leveraging smart city pact with Russia
India pushes smart city collaboration among BRICs countries

UK minister Priti Patel offers 5 lakh pound assistance for MP’s smart cities
UNDP to assist in developing Dharamshala as Smart City

Schneider’s India focus to be on renewables, smart grid
Oracle will create a cloud-based Centre of Excellence to help accelerate Maharashtra's 'Smart City' programme
CM Fadnavis in USA: Google to help Mumbai become ‘Wi-Fi city’
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  #222  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2016, 10:39 AM
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Bhubaneswar: India's Smart Cities Mission Neglecting Slum Dwellers, Say Activists
Bhubaneswar: Slum Dwellers Face Eviction As India Builds New Smart Cities
Bhubaneswar: Slum dwellers feel squeezed out of India’s ambitious Smart Cities plan
Jaipur: Slum dwellers wary of smart city plan

Eviction test for smart city
India’s Smart Cities Vision ‘overlooks poor’

'Smart City to improve quality of life'
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Assistant solicitor general Deepal Rawal in the reply tendered before the court stated that the focus in the Smart Cities Mission is on sustainable and inclusive development with idea to look at compact areas, create a replicable model, which will act like a light house to other aspiring areas/cities.

It was also replied that the objective of the Smart Cities Mission is to promote cities that provide core infrastructure and give a decent quality of life to its citizens. A clean and sustainable environment and application of smart solutions with the purpose to drive economic growth and improve the quality of life of people area based development will transform existing areas, including slums into better planned ones, thereby improving liveability of the whole city.
Can argue even on 100 cities versus rest of cities discrimination.

‘Smart city project threat to democracy’
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Terming the smart city project ‘a threat to democracy’, the Forum for Urban Governance and Commons has urged the State government to reject it. The forum said that the smart city concept is unconstitutional, bypasses democratically elected governments and provides executive power to bureaucrats and corporate entities.
Immigration key obstacle in 'Smart City' dream

Smart City should have 'Smart Plan' on how to handle immigration. Sadly, current 'Smart City Proposals' do not have a section to address this. This should not only be planned but execution has to be continuously monitored.

Not Just About Jobs and 'Smart' Cities

A new cartography for catalysts, not just cities
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The notion of cities as places distracts the urban governance movement from the deeper institutional design challenge. We need mayors to look after the territories, but we also need diplomats who have the institutional wherewithal to interact with and form agreements with their neighbours and peers in local government elsewhere. We need to rethink the foundations for horizontal interactions as well as vertical distribution of power.
To succeed, citizens must have more say in the Smart Cities Mission

Smart city planning can cut deadly diseases, improve air quality

The National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) should be integral part of Smart City projects, says MoS Hansraj Ahir
Fire Management key to smart cities, say detector installers
Water Bodies Central to Urban Flood Planning

Will smart cities be gender smart too, women activists ask PM Modi

"If You're Creating A Smart City Today, Start With A Strong Infrastructure."
5 Parameters that will define the success of smart city initiative
A Smart City Is A Truly Connected City

It Can't Just Be Wi-Fi In Public Spaces That Creates Smart Cities. So What Does?
‘Smart city has nothing to do with technology’

Effective sewage management system must for 'smart' city: CSE

Rampant Planning Is Impeding The Development Of Urban Infrastructure In India
Barring Rentals, Housing For All Mission 2022 May End Up As A Dud
Government Interventions Will Turn Smart Cities Into A Rozgar Yojana For Urban Planners
Misery To Continue: No Easy Solutions For India’s Traffic Woes

Smart Cities: Challenges in Developing and Implementing
India’s urbanization is like a revolution: McKinsey’s Jonathan Woetzel
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  #223  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2016, 10:46 AM
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Smart Cities: Here’s how Nagpur, Chandigarh, Puducherry could evolve
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He adds that over 30 countries have evinced interest in partnering with India for the Smart Cities Mission. And since there is more than R3 lakh crore that is going to be spent on the mission, obviously, everybody would like to have a slice of this pie. One of the ways to garner a slice is to finance the master plan for the cities, like France has proposed for Chandigarh, Puducherry and Nagpur and the US for Visakhapatnam. Specifications are then evolved for creating a smart city with inputs from world-class experts and consultants, mostly from that country. These also enable companies from that country to bid for the bigger set of orders for execution and implementation, explains Padode. “It’s a win-win situation because for India, in a sense, we are getting our cities designed for 20-30 years into the future for free. And for France or for any other country, they are able to get business for their companies,” he adds.

To date, two memorandums have been signed, one of them with the US Trade and Development Agency (USTDA) to develop Visakhapatnam, Allahabad and Ajmer, and the other with Agence Francaise de Developpement (AFD). The MoU with AFD is independent of the Smart Cities mission but not unrelated to it and a line of credit would be used to develop Nagpur, Chandigarh and Oulgaret (Puducherry)—Chandigarh already has a French connection, having been planned by noted French architect Le Corbusier while Puducherry has been a former French enclave.
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French companies like Alstom, Dassault, Egis, Lumiplan, RATP Transdev and Schneider have evinced interest in the Smart Cities Mission. Egis India, the Indian arm of the French engineering major Egis Group has already won a Smart City contract in Bhubaneswar and also bid in Chandigarh — separately it has earned an important contract for the Nagpur Metro. Tenders for Puducherry and Nagpur are yet to be issued.
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Smart agenda for india’s cities

* More than Rs 3 lakh crore to be spent on India’s Smart Cities Mission
* More than 30 countries have shown interest in the Smart Cities Mission
* France has proposed developing Chandigarh, Puducherry & Nagpur as Smart Cities
* It proposes focusing on integrated development, urban planning, urban transport, water supply, sanitation, waste management, architecture and heritage, renewable energy, and energy efficiency
* A pool of French experts from the public sector (French municipalities, companies, urban agencies), to render assistance along with private sector experts
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  #224  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2016, 10:51 AM
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Making cities inclusive
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The challenges of a rapidly urbanising world and of providing people with equal opportunities in cities were the central themes at the just-concluded UN Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development, Habitat III, in Quito, Ecuador. As a once-in-a-generation event, the Habitat conference sets a guiding compass for member-countries for the next 20 years, and attracts wide governmental and civil society participation. Yet, the process has to be strengthened to evaluate how countries have fared since the two previous conferences on issues such as reducing urban inequality, improving access to housing and sanitation, mobility, and securing the rights of women, children, older adults and people with disability. Moreover, as services come to occupy a dominant place in the urban economy, the divide between highly paid professionals and low-wage workers, the majority, has become pronounced. All these trends are relevant to India, where 31 per cent of the population and 26 per cent of the workforce was urban according to Census 2011, with more people moving to cities and towns each year. Urban governance policies, although mainly in the domain of the States, must be aligned with national commitments on reduction of carbon emissions under the Paris Agreement, and to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 11.

India’s ambition to harness science and data for orderly urbanisation is articulated in a set of policy initiatives, chiefly the Smart Cities Mission and the Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation. There is little evidence so far that these could achieve the scale needed to address the contradictions of building 21st century cities for 20th century industrial technologies. Today, these conflicts are reflected in the lack of adequate parks and public spaces, suitable land for informal workers who offer services in a city, egalitarian and non-polluting mobility options and new approaches to low-cost housing. In the national report prepared for the Quito conference, the Ministry of Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation identified subsidised redevelopment of slums (which represented 17 per cent of urban households in 2011) involving private agencies, and low-cost, disaster-resistant, prefabricated constructions as key to the ‘Housing for All’ policy. This important programme should be pursued with a vigorous annual review that ranks States on the basis of performance. The Centre should also take its own National Urban Transport Policy on developing cities around mobility networks seriously, and liberate cities from the tyranny of traffic. UN Habitat plans to review country-level progress on its New Urban Agenda in Kuala Lumpur in 2018. India’s performance on improving the quality of life in its cities will be watched.
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  #225  
Old Posted Nov 1, 2016, 8:32 AM
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10 things to know about Chattisgarh’s new capital
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The upcoming new capital of Chhattisgarh also holds the honour of being the first ‘new city’ of the 21st century, and is being built as a planned city along the lines of Jamshedpur, Bhubaneshwar, Gandhinagar, Chandigarh and Navi Mumbai. Here are some quick facts about Naya Raipur:

1) According to the official website of Naya Raipur, the city is described as an ultramodern ‘green and smart city’, which would provide all ‘modern amenities’ to its residents.

2) Three new lakes that are being developed will offer theme parks, which could benefit tourism of Naya Raipur and also serve as recreation and leisure spots for residents. The official website also claims that gardens and playgrounds will be spread across the city and will be linked together via a pedestrian corridor.

3) The development of Naya Raipur as a smart city was envisioned in the Naya Raipur Development Plan 2031, which was sanctioned in 2008. It divides the city into 40 sectors out of which 21 are residential sectors. Planning and development will be undertaken by the Naya Raipur Development Authority (NRDA).

4) The overall plan of Naya Raipur is based on creating a healthy and eco-friendly environment with a ‘state-of-the-vibrant-art infrastructure’. It is also believed that the new city will be integrated with the existing landscape, which aims at promoting a modern lifestyle with foundation in ‘traditional values’.

5) Naya Raipur is also being developed as an educational and service sector hub with plans to bring up several colleges. IIIT, National Law University, ITM University, Kalinga University among other major schools are currently operational.

6) A Central Business District Office Complex is also developed as a commercial city centre. IT hubs are also being developed. There are also plans to develop the health infrastructure of the city, with an aim of turning it into a health hub. An international cricket stadium, with a seating capacity of 50,000, is also in the works.

7) Among other features of Naya Raipur, it claims to provide that round the clock water supply, which will be undertaken on a PPP model. Also, 75.20 km of roads have already been constructed, while 61 km are under construction.

8) An underground power distribution system is also being developed for electricity supply. Premium residential sector are within the proximity of NRDA’s green corridors. 27 percent of the total city area is reserved as a green area, with nearly 5 lakh plants already. Also, 797 acres of land has been set aside for the development of Jungle Safari.

9) Naya Raipur is India’s sixth planned city after Jamshedpur (Jharkhand), Bhubaneshwar (Odisha), Gandhinagar (Gujarat), Chandigarh (Punjab & Haryana), and Navi Mumbai (Maharashtra) and fourth among the capital cities. The city is expected to house about 4.5 lakh (450,000) people within a decade. Provisions have been made for its expansion and to upgrade infrastructure in the future.

10) Naya Raipur would reflect the rich heritage and culture of Chhattisgarh and India, in its urban design and architecture. Special efforts would be taken to make it a people friendly and visitor friendly city
PM Modi in Naya Raipur today, 5 facts about Chhattisgarh’s new capital

Last edited by BolliBatlu; Nov 1, 2016 at 8:54 AM.
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  #226  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2016, 4:47 PM
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‘Infrastructure holds the key to success of smart city projects’
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How are smart city projects shaping up in India?

If you look at India, China, Singapore, Australia or the US, the big difference is in the maturity in smart city projects in India or the Middle East. They (India and Middle East) are much more advanced; and that is being replicated in other parts of the world.

The key message is: in order to build smart cities the government, industry, and all other verticals need to pay more importance to the foundation of the infrastructure.
Getting Asia's secondary cities into the 'smart' cities race
India needs indigenous solutions for smart cities: UNDP official

Ratings will help build smart cities
World Bank to rank cities on ‘ease of living’

Climate change and cities: Green buildings shouldn't be treated as an option anymore
Smart energy for a smart city
Women’s safety in smart cities
We need a smart way of dealing with e-waste
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  #227  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2016, 4:49 PM
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Cisco committed to help build 100 Smart Cities in India: Chuck Robbins
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SAN FRANCISCO: Not just Nagpur in Maharashtra, Cisco is working closely with state governments and its partners to digitally transform 14 cities and plans to connect 100 cities as part of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's Digital India initiative, its CEO, Chuck Robbins, has emphasised.
BSNL to join the smart city bandwagon
Axilspot to provide wireless connectivity to Smart City project
Bosch plans big on smart city projects
IBM Global Entrepreneur Invites Applications for Smartcamp Challenge for Smart City
Mindteck Wins Home Automation, AMI and System Integration Work in Smart City Pilot Project at IIT-Kanpur
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  #228  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2016, 5:41 AM
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What about the properties in Narasapura industrial sector.. I think more builders are focusing on the Narasapura for residential properties...
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  #229  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2016, 7:11 AM
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Do they have enough water to support industries or at least residences? Otherwise they can build a solar park.
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  #231  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2016, 7:17 AM
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Municipalities all set to issue smart city bonds

Unplanned migration needs ‘smart’ city planning
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Social infrastructure: A city needs social infrastructure for making it habitable, and most of this social infrastructure needs a critical mass of population and consumption to be viable.
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In developed countries, a Smart City is one where existing infrastructure is augmented, monitored and controlled, leading to highly sustainable development. In the Indian context, the approach is necessarily different. Since many cities lack basic infrastructure, institutional frameworks and proper governance, a Smart City initiatives will first and foremost involve providing basic civic requirements and making the infrastructure robust and scalable. They have to learn to identify new and smart ways to manage the complexity of urban living. These challenges can be met in two ways — building new (Greenfield) cities or transforming existing ones.
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Major challenges: Regional plan: The city must be envisaged vis-a-vis its existence as a member of the region, and the interactions and impact must be carefully studied. The region’s planning must augment the city’s plans to be able to provide a uniform experience Economic drivers: A clear plan of vibrant economic growth of the city based on multiple economic drivers must be the focus area of smart city.
Apart from regional plans what India needs is a Long-Term Smart Plan for entire country designed to achieve optimum economy, environment, social results which is equitable. We should develop a city versus population placement/distribution pattern which is optimized with resource availability across India, marine resources and imports. The states have to have 'Regional Smart Plans' which are based on 'Smart India Plan'. India & states should know which type of population distribution will give them optimum economical and environmental results. For example, states economical corridors should be integrated with countries economic corridors. On population, I think a city with more than say 5 million population is unhealthy as it has exhausted all resources available nearby and has to depend on far away places for raw materials, water, electricity, etc. In this case it is better to upgrade a small city in the vicinity of resources to support more population than burden a overpopulated city further with satellite towns. It is not green field cities but brown field small cities should be converted to big cities of reasonable size in proportion to availability of resources. The population of these cities & surrounding suburbs should be enough to support physical & social infrastructures for example an airport with reasonable connectivity.

'Indians aping US in over utilization of energy'
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Mark gave a brief overview of the development of the world economy and said that during a time of affluence and less inequality, we tend to destroy much of the natural resources and that is what happened with the great American dream. He pointed out that unfortunately Indians are trying to copy the Americans in terms of economic resources, wastage or over utilization of energy. The great renowed Gandhian economist Kumarappa in his book The Economy of Permanance talks about the free will of man which should be used wisely to coordinate human resources to strengthen the natural economy but using it foolishly can disturb the natural economy and destroy man himself.
The Smart Plan for India should strengthen natural economy.

From hinterlands to high-rises: Satellite cities emerging as magnets of urban convergence

The cost of satellite cities around huge metros is further strain on road infrastructure to their backyard hence environment.

How realistic is India’s Smart Cities Mission?
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A new city’s mobility system must be integrated with the regional transport system. For example, Lavasa as a city requires external transportation links, which implies that smart cities cannot plan and invest in matching regional infrastructure. This would devolve on the state or national infrastructure planning authority.
Economic planning a must for smart cities
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It is important for job creation to be part of city planning. For that, city agencies need to be empowered, say experts. In most cities around the globe, powerful mayors have been effective changemakers. In India, cities are governed by states, which have other priorities. Ideally, mayors should be empowered to decide on the economic planning of a city.
Breathing 'Soul' Into Smart Cities
The overrated urban spinoff

94 cities haven't met air quality standards in 5 years

Self driving cars won't work in India: RC Bhargava

Last edited by BolliBatlu; Nov 18, 2016 at 2:26 PM. Reason: updated my comment on population distribution
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  #232  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2016, 1:57 PM
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Amaravati to be a calamity-free city
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VIJAYAWADA: Stating that tackling natural calamities will be the big challenge in the future, chief minister N Chandrababu Naidu said the government will use best technologies and practices to make capital city Amaravati strong enough to withstand all kinds of calamities in the centuries to come.
India-UK collaboration in Amaravati building stressed
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The UK will set up eight Indo-UK hospitals with headquarters in Amaravati for which the Indian Prime Minister will lay the foundation stone soon.
Largest ever UK business delegation visits Kochi to offer Smart City solutions
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We have already supported the Kochi Smart Cities Project and I’m excited to be bringing more than 20 first-rate UK companies with expertise in transport infrastructure, built environment, energy, water, waste management and sanitation, technology infrastructure and securities and cyber solutions to see for themselves the opportunities this extraordinary city offers.”
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UK companies are showcasing a variety of innovative solutions at the Tech Summit. Exhibits include smart meters, a self-driving vehicle, solar-powered grids and advanced technology mobile devices.
UK delegation holds talks with Kochi Metro Rail Limited (KMRL) officials
UK firms extend help for Pune smart city project

Opinion: How the U.K. and India can lead the development of ecologically smart cities

Last edited by BolliBatlu; Nov 12, 2016 at 2:27 PM.
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  #233  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2016, 2:20 PM
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Less than 10% smart city projects in India will be of large scale by 2020: Gartner
Here’s why large-scale smart city projects are at risk in India
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The lack of a holistic, framework-based approach and a viable revenue model are stalling large-scale smart city projects in India, media research firm Gartner said, predicting that through 2020, less than 10 percent of smart city projects implemented across the country will be of a large-scale.
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“The good news is that central government has now appointed a CEO for every designated smart city to ensure long-term continuity and a more holistic approach to smart city development,” Ramamoorthy noted.

The city CEO office will need time to establish the necessary protocols, policies, procedures and mechanisms, as well as other modalities for interdepartmental communication, transaction and functioning with respect to smart city projects. Gartner stated that of the current funding, only about 20 percent will be used for IT-based smart city product, solution and service implementation, while the remaining 80 percent will be used for physical infrastructure development. As a result, city officials will likely look to the service providers to fund initial projects.
In its pursuit of “smart cities,” India is becoming a drier, hotter and angrier country
Daily waste from Indian cities, towns could fill 16 jumbo jets: Report

Are smart grids the answer to India’s power crisis?

Singapore is India's benchmark
Bhubaneswar bags third spot in World Smart City Awards 2016
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  #234  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2016, 2:55 PM
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Green Urban Transport Scheme to cost around Rs.80,000 crore
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“The file has been sent to the ministry of finance for approval. The funding of the scheme will be 50:50 between states and the central government. The central government has proposed a grant of Rs.25,000 crore, rest may come from multi-lateral banks and state governments,” said the official.

Around 105 cities will participate in the scheme which will be selected on the lines of ‘Smart City Challenge’, wherein each city will present its credentials to get the central assistance. The plan is expected to encourage private investments in climate-friendly and sustainable public transport systems such as Metro rail, non-motorised transport and other low-carbon emitting systems in urban areas.

“Cities having population more than a million will compete to get funds for the scheme. A competition on the lines of Smart City Challenge will be organised in which the cities would be asked to give proposals,” said another government official on condition of anonymity.
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“This scheme will help commuters to get first and last mile connectivity which will also help to reduce carbon emissions. Focus will be on sustainable urban mobility, facilities for pedestrians, cyclists, electric buses, Bus Rapid Transit System, urban freight management and transit-oriented development,” the second official said.
I don't think all 105 cities are of more than 1 million population.
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  #235  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2016, 8:30 AM
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Invest smartly The Japanese government is keen to partner with Karnataka in development of major projects like the Chennai-Bangalore industrial corridor, Bangalore metro, Bangalore’s peripheral ring road as per Govt of Karnataka
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  #236  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2016, 7:28 AM
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Does the demonetization affects the projects in the bangalore or any downfall in the real estate business .. I am sure some degrades should be happening at long run due to the demonetization
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  #237  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2016, 6:51 AM
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Smart cities are upcoming in fine industrial areas far from city center.. Price of apartments are available at affordable cost
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  #238  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2017, 3:20 PM
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What I think is Kochin, Visakhapatnam and Vijayawada-Amaravati-Guntur will be next growth drivers of South India. All these cities are having a healthy population of around 20 lakhs now and they can grow healthily to a population of around 40 lakhs.

In Karnataka, it will be Mangalore-Udupi, Hubli-Dharwad-Belgaum region. (We are encouraging new investments in Hubballi-Dharwad-Belagavi belt and Mangaluru-Udupi belt. I doubt this because guaranteeing 24 hour power supply to a single city and incessant power cuts in other cities is the main reason for skewed & non-equitable development of Karnataka and also many other states. There is huge concentration of population around a single city but a city like Mangaluru with potential to accommodate more population more sustainably has less population. Though even the central government has plan to encourage these belts of the state.) Even Bellary-Hospet region may produce surprises if global demand for steel picks up to result in four metropolitan regions at four parts of Karnataka. (Gulbarga, Vijayapura, Davanagere all are other candidates though map attached below shows Hassan at intersection of highways.) That is, at least four cities (or city clusters or city belts) generating jobs for Karnataka instead of a single city. I want these cities along with others to even out growth and population within Karnataka so that Karnataka will have long term environmental and economical benefits instead of short sighted big plans of focusing on development around a single city for immediate benefits compromising on the ecological & economical needs of rest of Karnataka. Mangaluru inspite of having airport with good national & international traffic, high lietracy rate has only population of around 6 lakhs and it has already constructed water reservoir to take care of 20 lakhs population, and so can readily reach current population level of Hubli-Dharwad (which is 10 lakhs) if enough jobs are generated for that much population (that should be around one lakh jobs) by minimum investment on infrastrucutre like improvent of roads and airport runway expansion. Hubli-Dharwad can be easily promoted as an Automobile Knowledge, Innovation, Services and Production Hub with 'Automobile University' or 'Indian Institute of Automobiles' and colleges, IT, BPO and factories and other jobs related to this domain. (Currently best education in Automobile Engineering in Karnataka is provided by a college in Hassan where there is no automobile industry!) Similarly Belgaum as an Aerospace Hub and Mangalore as a Marine Hub. Automobile and Aersopace are complementary industries to each other and hence both Hubli-Dharwad and Belgaum can grow helping each other & without competing with each other in different sectors. I am specifying sector or domain as smaller cities can not have sustainable job prospectus in every sector though each city need more than one sector to avoid sector-specific economic risks and if they attempt every sector there will be brain drain to bigger cities seeking better opportunities turning these cities as just training centres. Focusing on two or threes sectors can help these cities by generating enough jobs in those particular sectors. For example Mangalore-Udupi can have sectors like Marine, Hydrocarbon, Education or Tourism or Finance. Mangalore is also suitable for evolving cutting edge technology of subsea or underwater datacenters as it is protected well and far way from reach of hostile countries. Hubli-Dharwad-Belgaum with Karwar can develop defense productors for Army, Airforce & Navy as a second sector and education as a third sector. So starting with two or three sectors I think each city (or city belts) of Karnataka ultimately can reach population around 30-40 lakhs sustainably and expand themselves to more sectors later. These cities should also be developed as a cosmopolitan city like existing mega cities by attracting talent not only from all over India but also from existing mega cities. On big advantage side, all residents of Karnataka will have a big city with all facilities in their vicinity with maximum travel time of around 3 hours so that they can complete visit to city for whatever reason in a single day. So, what is required for Karnataka is politicians of the state who are now proudly developing a single city 'for Karnataka' have to become more broadminded & proud to say that we have started developing Mangaluru for Karnataka, Hubbali for Karnataka, Belagavi for Karnataka, Ballari for Karnataka. I don't have any issue if they become more broadminded and start to say that we are developing all these cities for India.

Going back to South India, for example, why I think Kochin growth will be environtmentally more sustainable is because the city has enough water resources. The state (Kerala) need not destroy westernghats to bring water to Kochin from some other place or the state need not put up a thermal plant of GWs in some other region to power water from a lower altitude area to a higher altitude region. Growth of a city always mean converting greenfield areas to industries and townships, there is always negative impact on environment, but in case of Kochin environment impact is local (moreover Kochin is growing vertically), it can grow without hurting environment of any other region of the state (examples are given at the begining of this paragraph). And it can smartly plan for reducing local environmental impact as it has good backwater stretch to support ecofriendly waterways for transportation, for its food (enough water is available to support agriculture around the city itself) and most of raw material needs in the vicinity itself. In summary, in comparison to a big metropolitan city, Kochin can grow to a population of 40 lakhs in an inclusive sustainable way with villages surrounding it and the state. And 40 lakh population is more than good enough to have economically sustainable social infrastructures like themeparks, disneyland etc and other infrastructures like airport if economic productivity of people are high and of course, Kochin has good number of native people working outside & abroad and they definitely influence migrants to prosperty. In the next step Kerala may have to develop one or two more big cities of 40 lakhs for the amount of its population say Thiruvanathapuram and Kozhikode.

What is important is India as a whole to grow in a sustainable inclusive way not a limited number of overgrown cities making disastrous impact on other regions. Once upon a time, before colonization, every village of India was self sustainble and India was number one economy of the world till colonization with its GDP being continuously above 30% of GDP of the world for more than thousand and five hundred years. But in modern times, with changed technolgy & lifestyle we need to find out new ways of making India sustainable by developing sustainable cities & villages supporting each other rather than mega metro cities isolated or remotely connected to villages.

Population distribution across country should be smartly planned for environment & economical sustainability of overall country. Some of criteria for population (including floating population) distribution across cities of country as per my notion are
  • City has huge hinterland of resources like water, electricity and transportation cost of these supplies is minimum & will not damage environment of the other region. Resources includes land based, marine based and imports. (Currently stress is on green building to localize pollution remedy as much as possible including liquid waste management, wind or solar electricity generation, etc. What we need is a city which produces all types of pollution also consumes all pollutions produced by it itself without making villages around it dumping yard of waste or remote villages suffer from pollution of thermal plants. Ideally a city should feel the pollution it is causing itself and take remedy action within itself without affecting any other village or city.)(It is good that Standards for Smart Cities stresses on monitoring renewable energy by providing some indicators.)
  • Enough farmland around city to reduce transportation cost of vegetables and grains consumed by city. City can be shaped in such a way to reduce this & overall transportation cost further. Agriculture stress should be more on local consumption not export oriented stuff like floriculture in case of less availability of irrigated farmland around city.
  • City can produce most of FMCG items locally for reducing transportation costs & raw materials for these products are also available in the vicinity of the city. (FMCG is common production sector for every city but smaller cities can have only two or three specialization sectors for the reason I mentioned already)
  • City has less number of threats & risks and hence risk mitigation cost, climate change adaptation & resilience cost and disaster management & recovery cost are less.
  • Big cities (less than 50 lakhs) with airports, High Speed Railway stations are distributed evenly across country so that every person staying in every remote corner of country can avail these facility with minimum travel even if at low speed.
  • Cities with well developed infrastructures like airport, literacy and per capita income can grow faster and spread economical prosperity to incoming migrant population faster.
  • Less population on desert and fertile lands (means less conversion of fertile land for urbanization).
Many of the criteria mentioned above may contradict each other. So what we have to achieve is mathematically optimized result. And I know that there are many more criteria which I have missed. I have neglected some criteria like areas where nothing can be grown around but cities are there. More research has to be done on this. This can give long term environmental & economical benefits instead of wasting money & effort on short term benefits. What we need is a integrated transportation, water, energy, food, industry, population management plan for entire country which will give optimized sustainable environmental and economical results.



One of the way to place metro cities is near intersection of north-south and east-west highways, highways being bypassing these cities. But this is not practical as city placement has to be adjusted with existing cities. (Don't be surprised if this condition is already satisfied as these highways are designed to pass through larger cities but some realignment may be needed.) Next, decide population of a city based on criteria mentioned above. This will make balanced distribution of population across cities of India. As I have already stated any person should be able to travel to a big city nearby with all facilities by travelling maximum of 3 hours finish his works and return back to his village or small city. For example, a person can finish meeting with health experts in a day if needed in spite of telemedicine or a patient can be admitted to a hightech superspeciality hospital by travelling for maximum of 3 hours. That means uniform distribution of big cities (of 40 lakhs population) separated by 6 hours journeys across India. Also, greenery of villages surrounding a city should be able to produce enough oxygen for the city hoping villages will not produce pollutions like smoke. And it can increase family bond by allowing people of rural origin working in city to visit their village during every weekend assuming that the city employs mostly people from surrounding region.

The central government can help in balanced growth of country by implementing a similar scheme like it is doing for improving air connectivity of tier-II/III cities. It can impose additional cess on overpopulated mega cities in domains like IT/BT and use this money to incentivize IT/BT in tier-II/III cities. This is one of ways the central government can control population distribution and job opportunities across India smartly. Better Dearness Allowance is one of reason encouraging people move to metro cities. And even supplying continuous electricity to metro cities at the cost of power cuts on other cities has to be reversed to have a balanced population distribution and to reduce the environmental effect of skewed economical growth in the states suffering from power shortages. And no more new central institutes & government IT facilities should be opened in current metro cities which already have enough of them. Even people should be allowed to apply for bigger houses (more than 60 sqm) under affordable housing scheme in non-mega metro cities to lure more people to smaller cities. Smaller cities with capability can be allowed to grow to a city of size 30 lakhs with incentives and after crossing this population they can be disincentivized. Once they cross 40 lakhs additional cess can be imposed on city to limit further growth and same money could be used for developing other cities waiting to grow. But a few cities even after crossing 40 lakhs may need incentives in specific areas like air connectivity until people become economically productive to sustain these services.

High Speed trains connectivity of other cities to 'National/International Hub Airports or Airline Hubs' leads to seamless multi-modal high speed transport and helps in multi-mode single ticket and checked luggage tagged to the final destination travels. We may coin the term like 'highspeed transit oriented development' as more population will be concentrated around 'multimode highspeed hubs'.

And I support 'walk to work' concept against 'stay in one city and work in another city' concept enabled by highspeed or bullet trains or hyperloop though I support small/big cities connected to airport hubs of bigger cities through highspeed rail network for other long distance travel purposes wherever highspeed rail is feasible. I support multimode transportation (transit oriented development) for both local and distance travel. Local transortation should be multimode of train, bus, autorikshaws, taxis and bicycles. Though I am not sure to what an extent local transportation like commuter train or metrorail should be integrated to highspeed transportation network like of airport or bullet trains.

My wish is a city should not just be a production place (where innovative technology invented somewhere else) but knowledge & innovation place also. So at least in one or two sectors/domains a city should have everything unlike silicon valley model of innovation in that city and production somewhere else. Let me also explain the 'innovation' in smart city context as per my understanding so to make it clear what I am talking about here. A smart city should be innovative not only in its governance & policies but also it should continuously innovate its infrastructures like economical infrastructure so to be in competition with other cities who have built their economical infrastructure in the same domain. A smart city should also have a 'Smart Innovation Plan' (or the country should have a general knowledgebase of innovations happening around the world. Each domain/section/field may have its own innovation center dedicated to study innovations around the world in that particular domain/section/field. For example, we already have many 'Educational Innovations Centers' but we need sophisticated 'Educational Informatics Centers' for more systematized studies and similarly 'Institutional Innovations Centers' & 'Institutional Informatics Centers'. I don't know how much 'Data Analysis' each city is going to do on global data. I don't know whether India is going to have "Urban Informatics Centers' or combined 'Urban-Rural Informatics Systems' addressing various needs like innovation, etc. No idea whether existing SMARTNET can be adapted for this.)(Many of smart cities in their vision statement have mentioned that they want to be innovative. But how they achieve that is not specified anywhere by them). A smart city should know what innovations are happening around the world in social, institutional & governance, economical, legal, physical infrastructures and adapt to it quickly to be a globally competitive city. For example a manufacturing city should be upto date with innovative production techniques to be economically viable though innovative techniques & products are discovered somewhere else. That is what smart city definition of 'innovation'. But what I am aiming is production, innovation in production process, innovation in products and every other kind of innovation is done within same city in its domain. What I wish is most of cities should be knowledge centre for products they manufacture. There may be a few cities which may not become knowledge center for many reasons for example in a high temperature region many of whitecolor professionals may not like to stay or there could be water shortage unable to support huge population for other things except for production. In other words what I am saying is as far as possible a city should be fulfledged knowledge city in its domains/sectors of strength. In addition, a city should also have capacity to come out with its own innovative methods in social, institutional and other infrastructures apart from monitoring and adapting innovations happening across the world.

Footnote: 40 lakhs population limit on a city and 6 hours distance between big cities, the numbers specified here are just magic numbers without any proof and exact value should be found by more research. But what I believe is there is a value (or multivalues depeding on regional criteria, we can call solutions as 'critical population masses' satisfying criteria mentioned above and have all facilties needed by population within 'critical distances'. And a city is not scalable beyond its 'critical population mass' without a chain effect on ecology of region and cities surrounding it.) for these numbers which will give optimized economically & ecologically sustainable result for the country. (I don't have any reason to say why distance is measured in hours. And more over mode of travel is also not defined. I can just say that in case of emergencies people should be able to avail best treatment available in a near by city as fast as possible but there should be enough rural space around city for agriculture to minimize agricultural product transportation pollution.) And instead of horizontal and vertical highways there could be other highway models enabling faster movement across India hence need more research on highway networking model also. Suppose if 60% of India's population should be in cities, how much of them should be in big cities and how much in small cities is also a research subject. Ultimatley it is the question of finding out whether there is 'cricial population mass' beyond which India is neither economically nor ecologically sustainable irrespective of import-export figures or the question is what is the scalability of India's total population. Even available extent of land may go down if sea level rises due to climate change. Should we get ready to build cities in ocean and space? Let us wait and find out how many of us will be cosmonauts and how many will be aquanauts. And which type of 'multimode transportation' will connect 'multimode townships'? It would be interesting to develop a combined economical & environmental model for India to check what happens as population grows. Once model is developed it may be possible to control it & distribute it properly.

New cities would be important in creating new India: PM Modi

I would prefer expansion of small cities instead of creating totally new cities as ghost cities or creating satellite cities for over congested metro cities for reasons mentioned above. Anyway below is a contradictory view. But I consider Amaravati as an extension of Vijayawada so that it satisfy my view.

PM's digital dream: Why Amravati should be the pilot smart city
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  #239  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2017, 3:22 PM
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Real Estate sector needs incentives in this budget for building Smart City mission
Quote:
Vanita Akhaury Jan, 18 2017 14:32:18 IST

“There is a lot to be done at the state and local government level which is outside the ambit of the central budget. Provision of adequate public transport coverage, sanitation, quick building plan approval, etc. are all subjects which need to be dealt at the local government level,” says Prof. Dr.P.S.N.Rao, Professor and Head, Department of Housing, SPA New Delhi.

“They are the 'last mile connectivity' issues in the urban sector which need to be tackled, without this, no amount of central government initiatives can bring about any meaningful change in our urban scenario,” Rao says.

Also, as there are several core elements that combine to make up the infrastructure of the Smart City mission, efficient collaboration among its different stakeholders (Public Private Partnership) could avoid time lags. The government should also come up with a firm legal framework so that multiple stakeholders are bound to work in a timely manner. Another challenge is the communication flow between the city custodians and policy drafters.
Quote:
More than funding, a larger challenge during the implementation of Smart Cities Mission in India is reforming the Urban Local Bodies to make them capable of independently generating their own funding, says Shubhranshu Pani, Managing Director - Strategic Consulting, JLL India. Our suggestion to the finance minister for budget 2017-18 would be to put into practice a clear roadmap on digitisation of the ULBs and database management at the ULB’s daily activities level. Till this happens, states will have to act as guarantors for investments made by private companies.

Pani says, Infrastructure financing (via Infrastructure Investment Trusts or InvITS) is yet to take off in a big way in India. “Given the sector’s importance in the success of several priority sector areas such as affordable housing, smart cities etc., the budget should possibly announce measures to further assure investors of adequate stable policies from the mid to long term. The government also should add transit-oriented development and municipal infrastructure with similar solutions like road and rail infrastructure.”

The key to success of Smart Cities mission will be good governance and service delivery in supplying and managing urban amenities, and customisation of adaptable technology solutions to suit different economic and social environments. No technology can make the system work better if basic services don’t exist. Smart cities should be able to fulfill increasing urban needs with a long-term vision. Also, the approach should be for smart solutions.
Incetives should be more for small cities which have potential to grow compared to congested metro cities. For example as stated earlier people should be allowed to apply for bigger than 60 sqm houses under affordable housing scheme in non-metro cities to lure more people to smaller cities.

Smart Cities, Single Window Clearances, Real Estate Act: Government Initiatives for Sector
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  #240  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2017, 3:31 PM
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Smart City indicators are here, 2
Draft standards want cities to buck up for smart tag, year after mission’s launch

Draft Standards for Smart Cities in India, 2

This document lists many indicators with benchmarks to achieve good governance, availability of services, inclusiveness, sustainability, etc. One can appreciate the indicators for their simplicity but whether indicators are adequate enough? For examples,

A city should be monitored for how much its growth affects environment of other cities and villages. Indicators like 'Renewable Energy Indicators' does not tell us whether renewable energy is produced within city or somewhere else by acquiring fertile farmland for this purpose. These indicators don't show adequately how a city exploits other regions for its selfishness. For state capitals better to add indicators of entire state itself so to check how much responsibility it has taken to develop entire state or whether it is self-centered & non-inclusive.

Moreover cities are not developed only for serving people staying within city but also whole range of villages and small cities surrounding it. A city has to take responsibility for a huge region around it as everyone in this region has contributed to the initial growth of this city by paying tax. So, some of indicators like health indicators like 'Average response time in case of health emergencies' should include entire rural area coming under city's purview as city is providing health services to these areas. Even educational, economy & employment, electricity, etc indicators should reflect properly rural area expectations from a city. A city is useless unless it serves & uplifts area surrounding it. A state capital city is useless unless it develops entire state. These type of cities can be called a gated community where lesser privileged people staying out side the city wall just waiting to jump in to the city and cause chaos in city and also across the state.

Value of indicators like 'Percentage of plots with rainwater harvesting facility' can be 100% even if every plot/house stores 1000 liters of rainwater. In reality city should have enough water for non-rainy seasons and also in a few cases for next drought year.

In conclusion, the indicators are good enough to begin with. But needs more sophistication for future.
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