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  #1  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2015, 6:54 PM
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summersm343 summersm343 is offline
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PHILADELPHIA | Penn Medicine New Patient Pavilion | 357 FT | 16 FLOORS

Title: Penn Medicine New Patient Pavilion
Project: Hospital/Medical
Architect: Norman Foster
Developer: Penn Medicine
Location: 300 South 33rd St. Philadelphia, PA
Neighborhood: University City
District: West Philadelphia
Floors: 16 floors
Height: 357 feet







Renderings provided by Flyers2001:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=7808

Quote:
The University of Pennsylvania is no stranger to the upper stratosphere in pretty much every category, including medical care and facilities and architecture and design. So it may come as no surprise that they’ve retained a star-studded lineup of design and construction companies, anchored by Foster + Partners and L.F. Driscoll, to lead their new $1.5 billion hospital tower project, according to a report from Philadelphia Business Journal.

The project would be done in multiple phases over several years. It’s expected that the health system will begin razing Penn Tower sometime this year in preparation to make way for construction of the new hospital.

L.F. Driscoll and Balfour Beatty are in charge of the construction side of the project–which could be a 700-bed hospital tower with 50 operating rooms and other medical services.

Read more at http://www.phillymag.com/property/20...KpC4pVoRgoM.99
Another article:
http://www.bizjournals.com/philadelp...ment-team.html

The new development will replace the 20 floor, 254 foot outdated Penn Tower pictured here:


http://www.emporis.com/buildings/118...delphia-pa-usa

Last edited by summersm343; Nov 16, 2016 at 4:28 PM.
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  #2  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2015, 10:06 PM
Flyers2001 Flyers2001 is offline
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It will be pretty impressive to have a room in the back of the hospital as it will have some of the best views of CC when all is said and done.

As with all Penn projects Driscoll will be taking the lead.

**many Driscoll front office were moved from Penn Tower LL to trailers on top of 3600 garage. The lone trailer on the space next to 3600 has been removed and bulldozers and other heavy equipment has returned. I'll keep an eye and ear out on wether they are resuming construction on 3600 the building.
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2015, 11:17 PM
Philly Fan Philly Fan is offline
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The annual spring meeting of the Penn Trustees was held last Thursday and Friday. I wonder if this was discussed, including these preliminary plans and drawings. Haven't seen anything yet, but I'll keep an eye out and report back here if I do. They're the ones who ultimately have to approve this.
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2015, 11:22 PM
Philly Fan Philly Fan is offline
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Just a suggestion, summers, but it might be better to title this thread "Penn Medicine Towers," and not just "Penn Towers," to distinguish it from general Penn campus construction.
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2015, 11:42 PM
Flyers2001 Flyers2001 is offline
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Originally Posted by Philly Fan View Post
The annual spring meeting of the Penn Trustees was held last Thursday and Friday. I wonder if this was discussed, including these preliminary plans and drawings. Haven't seen anything yet, but I'll keep an eye out and report back here if I do. They're the ones who ultimately have to approve this.
The trustees met last Thursday, they meet every 1-2 months. Last Friday there was a sustainability meeting where the new hospital was discussed. It involved department heads from not only Penn Mesicine but associated business like EVS and Impark.
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  #6  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2015, 11:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Philly Fan View Post
Just a suggestion, summers, but it might be better to title this thread "Penn Medicine Towers," and not just "Penn Towers," to distinguish it from general Penn campus construction.
Good suggestion. Changed it.
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  #7  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2015, 12:34 AM
christof christof is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyers2001 View Post
The trustees met last Thursday, they meet every 1-2 months. Last Friday there was a sustainability meeting where the new hospital was discussed. It involved department heads from not only Penn Mesicine but associated business like EVS and Impark.
Trustees have a regular quarterly meeting.
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  #8  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2015, 1:08 AM
Philly Fan Philly Fan is offline
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Originally Posted by Flyers2001 View Post
The trustees met last Thursday, they meet every 1-2 months. Last Friday there was a sustainability meeting where the new hospital was discussed. It involved department heads from not only Penn Mesicine but associated business like EVS and Impark.
The full Board of Trustees, which is necessary to approve big projects like this, only meets 3 times a year--winter, spring, and fall. And the day before those meetings of the full board, the committees that make up the full board have their meetings. The Executive Committee (and, I believe, the Budget and Finance Committee) also meet another 2 or 3 times a year as needed, but major trustee decisions (e.g., major capital expenditures, policy changes, high-level executive appointments, etc.) only happen at the 3-a-year full Board of Trustees meetings:

https://secure.www.upenn.edu/secreta...usteemtgs.html

So it's possible that there was a discussion of the architectural plans at the Facilities & Campus Planning Committee meeting on Thursday, or even at the full Board of Trustees meeting on Friday:

https://secure.www.upenn.edu/secreta...sopenmtgs.html

I usually read the minutes of the Penn Trustees meetings when they're published, but that won't happen for this spring meeting until the minutes are approved at next fall's meeting of the full board. The trustees meetings are also covered in the internal Penn publication, "Almanac" (http://www.upenn.edu/almanac/), but that's currently on a summer publication schedule, so its coverage of this meeting may be a bit delayed. The Daily Pennsylvanian, which also generally covers trustees meetings, is currently on its summer weekly schedule, so there may be a story on the spring trustees meeting tomorrow. As I said, I'll keep an eye out.
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  #9  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2015, 1:10 AM
Philly Fan Philly Fan is offline
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Originally Posted by christof View Post
Trustees have a regular quarterly meeting.
Almost--the full Board of Trustees actually meets only three times a year.
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  #10  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2015, 9:41 PM
Flyers2001 Flyers2001 is offline
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Originally Posted by Philly Fan View Post
Almost--the full Board of Trustees actually meets only three times a year.
I can tell you from first hand experience in the last 2 months they have met multiple times. Whether it is there regularly scheduled meetings and additional meeting in regards to opening JMEC and anniversary celebration they have been there.

I am sure they discussed a variety of items. Doesn't really matter as the timetable is 2021 for completion, which came from the sustainability meeting.
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  #11  
Old Posted Jun 26, 2015, 1:13 AM
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My power has been out since Tuesday since my section of Delco was among the hardest hit during Tuesday's storm (tornado for my area). Service returned today, and I come on Skyscraperpage to find THIS?! A NORMAN FOSTER designed building? I don't know what makes me happier, the power being back on or discovering this!
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  #12  
Old Posted Jun 26, 2015, 1:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Flyers2001 View Post
I can tell you from first hand experience in the last 2 months they have met multiple times. Whether it is there regularly scheduled meetings and additional meeting in regards to opening JMEC and anniversary celebration they have been there.

I am sure they discussed a variety of items. Doesn't really matter as the timetable is 2021 for completion, which came from the sustainability meeting.
I think maybe we're talking about two different things. Penn's full Board of Trustees consists of more than 50 people, and they meet formally only three times a year. And it's at those formal meetings, at which minutes are taken and subsequently published, that big decisions are formally voted on and made. Now of course, with an institution the size and complexity of Penn, there is a lot of informal meeting and communication that occurs among various trustees throughout the year, but it's generally only at the full formal meetings 3 times a year that big decisions are officially made. So it's at those formal meetings, for example, that the full Board of Trustees will give final approval to the plans for this project and its total budget (after a lot of informal work and communication by the relevant trustees committee(s) overseeing the project). And even at meetings prior to the one at which they vote on final approval, they'll be given progress reports and vote on approval of preliminary funds for, e.g., architecture and planning.

If you're interested (and I'd certainly understand if you aren't ), here's an example of what I'm talking about, including capital project expenditure approvals beginning on page 7:

http://www.archives.upenn.edu/primdo...20150227tr.pdf

And here are the actual resolutions from that meeting, which provide a lot more detail about what they approved:

http://www.archives.upenn.edu/primdo...0150227res.pdf

Reading this kind of stuff is one of my pastimes.
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  #13  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2015, 10:11 PM
Plokoon11 Plokoon11 is offline
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I have to start going on vacation more often, everytime I leave something awesome happens haha. Nice design!
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  #14  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2015, 10:24 AM
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From what I heared, there will be 3 phases. 1/2 seems like it will be built together opening the hospital. Phase 3 will either be built right after opening or a delay. Not sure yet.



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  #15  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2015, 5:15 PM
GarCastle GarCastle is offline
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Inside sketch

Looks like the museum building through the windows. Found this on the HDR site.



Cheers,
G.
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  #16  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2015, 5:19 PM
GarCastle GarCastle is offline
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It's also worth noting that none of these drawings show a bridge from the old/current H.U.P. buildings to the new 700-bed tower nor to the existing Perelman buildings. The only bridge seems to be from the new 700-bed tower to the existing Perelman buildings. That may or may not confirm that the existing H.U.P. buildings will be re-purposed by the University itself and no longer health system buildings, which was the plan a few years back.

Cheers,
G.
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  #17  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2015, 9:04 AM
shadowbat2 shadowbat2 is offline
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Site status as of Friday....

110 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr
You can see the Penn Tower, Perelman and Smilow buildings, as well as the existing HUP which will relocate to the planned building.

One issue has to be resolved before anything can be done: to get from Perelman to HUP via skywalk, patients, visitors, and staff have to go via Penn Tower's second floor. Therefore a new bridge has to be erected to circumvent it....
112 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr

This structure will join in with the existing skywalk leading from Penn Tower enabling the tower to be cut off in preparation for demolition....

111 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr

There were two renderings of this temporary skywalk posted next to each other. Now this I found funny, if you look past the glare you can make out the existing Penn Tower silhouette and the skywalk leading to it still intact....

114 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr

Turn the corner and there is another render that looks almost identical except the Tower is gone and they have a stubby looking crane in it's place
115 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr

Penn Tower with the bridge to Perelman
116 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr

It should also be mentioned that Penn Tower wasn't exactly built to a high standard to begin with and the garage has required numerous repair jobs in recent years. You can see the extreme spalling and the steel braces that were added to keep the concrete panels in place.
119 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr
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  #18  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2015, 12:20 PM
skyscraper skyscraper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowbat2 View Post
Site status as of Friday....

110 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr
You can see the Penn Tower, Perelman and Smilow buildings, as well as the existing HUP which will relocate to the planned building.

One issue has to be resolved before anything can be done: to get from Perelman to HUP via skywalk, patients, visitors, and staff have to go via Penn Tower's second floor. Therefore a new bridge has to be erected to circumvent it....
112 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr

This structure will join in with the existing skywalk leading from Penn Tower enabling the tower to be cut off in preparation for demolition....

111 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr

There were two renderings of this temporary skywalk posted next to each other. Now this I found funny, if you look past the glare you can make out the existing Penn Tower silhouette and the skywalk leading to it still intact....

114 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr

Turn the corner and there is another render that looks almost identical except the Tower is gone and they have a stubby looking crane in it's place
115 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr

Penn Tower with the bridge to Perelman
116 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr

It should also be mentioned that Penn Tower wasn't exactly built to a high standard to begin with and the garage has required numerous repair jobs in recent years. You can see the extreme spalling and the steel braces that were added to keep the concrete panels in place.
119 by tehshadowbat, on Flickr
Penn Tower wasn't built to extremely high standards because it was only ever meant to be a temporary structure, a hotel built for the Bicentennial.
One value-add here: they are going to start dismantling the tower crane next week.
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  #19  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2015, 11:35 PM
GarCastle GarCastle is offline
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That design is not released media-wise and has not been finalized among the VPs. Given it looks much farther along than the blocky massing model photos I took and posted months back. So it may change a little or it may change quite a bit. Being done in stages (with a $1.5 bln budget) is certainly a safe bet since it has been Penn Med's M.O. for awhile now with that complex and the VP of real estate said that it would be done in stages more than a year ago.

The parts I'm most curious about are if the 700 bed goal is just a phase since that's less than the current census of HUP, and if any current HUP buildings will remain part of Penn Med.

Cheers,
G.
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Old Posted Aug 20, 2015, 7:29 AM
ajaxean ajaxean is offline
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It's a huge disappointment to see that these are the new current renderings. It seems like a MAJOR step backward from the earlier site plan. These renderings and models from over a year ago looked much sexier and also fit in waaaay better architectually with CHOP and the existing Perelman Center. The current plan looks more like a Florida apartment building or shopping mall than a cutting-edge hospital.

That said, Penn's architectural taste is consistently the worst I've ever seen. The Perelman Center is a $600 million architectural atrocity that keeps getting worse and worse with each afterthought addition Penn heaps onto it. I was really hoping that the new expansion would help redeem the Penn Medicine campus, and I thought the old plan actually succeeded in unifying HUP, CHOP, and the Perelman Center. In contrast, the new design doesn't seem to fit in well with anything on Civic Center Blvd.

OLD rendering and site model (from > 1 year ago), apparently ditched for the plans posted above:






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