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Old Posted Jan 9, 2016, 3:22 AM
Carborundum Carborundum is offline
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Terrestrial Energy gets funding for Game-changing Molten Salt Nuclear Reactor

Canadian company Terrestrial Energy has secured CAD$10 million ($7 million) in Series A funding to support its program to bring its Integral Molten Salt Reactor (IMSR) technology to industrial markets in the 2020s.

Terrestrial Energy CEO Simon Irish said that the funds will be used to support pre-construction and pre-licensing engineering, and to support further engagement with industry and nuclear regulators. "These programs allow the Company to demonstrate to industry the commercial merits of the IMSR design," he said.

Series A funding is a term used to describe a company's first round of funding secured by selling preferred stock to investors, typically venture capitalists. Details on the source of Terrestrial Energy's funding have not been revealed.

Terrestrial Energy in January 2015 announced a collaboration with ORNL to develop its IMSR design to the engineering blueprint stage.

The conceptual design stage is anticipated to be completed in 2017.

Canadian David LeBlanc is developing the Integral Molten Salt Reactor, or IMSR. The goal is to commercialize the Terrestrial reactor by 2021.

Read more at Next Big Future and cantech letter.

You can visit Terrestial Energy's Website here.


Render by Terrestrial Energy of their IMSR plant.
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Old Posted Jan 27, 2016, 3:12 PM
mrnyc mrnyc is offline
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interesting technology. this looks like a mini nuclear plant that uses salts to power it up and to cool it down, yes? if so, near the cleveland salt mines under lake is the place to build one:

http://fox8.com/2013/01/31/fox-8-exp...low-lake-erie/

there is a big salt mine under downtown detroit too.
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Old Posted Jan 27, 2016, 6:27 PM
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wong21fr wong21fr is offline
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Get in line Terrestrial. There's plenty of other competitors in the SMR market- none of which has actually produced a unit yet.
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Old Posted Feb 1, 2016, 5:36 AM
TMSteele TMSteele is offline
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Good luck Terrestrial Energy.
In 1955 Rocketdyne fired up a Sodium Reactor in Los Angeles area. It was located in the hills at their top secret research facility ten miles from the Reagan Library in Simi Valley. At the time the area was rural. In 1959, the reactor core melted down due to sodium's volatility when exposed to oxygen. Subsequently, the feds disposed of any evidence and felt it wasn't in the national interest to disclose whether the surrounding area (presently State park land donated by Lockheed) is contaminated. There are now hundred of thousands of people living within ten miles of the site and witless recreational hikers drawn to the terrain.
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Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 2:17 AM
Carborundum Carborundum is offline
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The Simi Valley site released very little Iodine-131, which has decayed by now to background radioactivity levels. Secrecy and government coverup? Yes. Hazard to public health? No.

Terrestrial Energy's reactor is designed not to release any gasses during an emergency event and not meltdown.
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Old Posted Feb 5, 2016, 6:36 PM
donoteat donoteat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carborundum View Post
Terrestrial Energy's reactor is designed not to release any gasses during an emergency event and not meltdown.
To clarify, the fuel is molten during normal operation.

i.e. it can't catastrophically meltdown, because it's already melted down just to fire it up.

What's more it runs at atmospheric pressure, rather than some ludicrous PSI, so the threat of a containment vessel breach from pressure or steam explosion or whatever is nearly negligible.
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