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Old Posted May 3, 2016, 3:05 AM
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scalziand scalziand is offline
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Location: Naugatuck, CT/Worcester,MA
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Composite fiber reinforced concrete donuts can be used to repair quake damaged bridge

Composite fiber reinforced concrete donuts can be used to repair quake damaged bridges in days instead of weeks

In an earthquake, a bridge is designed to take the brunt of the damage at the top and bottom of the vertical columns where they meet the foundation and the horizontal beams. If a bridge survives from collapsing but the columns are damaged, it is likely too unstable to be driven over. And if several of the steel rebar in the columns have snapped, the bridge likely cannot be repaired at all and must be torn down.

But if the columns can be repaired, engineers typically chip away at the concrete, replace any bent rebar and steel hoops inside and then pour new concrete into a steel cast that's built around the column. That's a lengthy process that leaves the bridge unusable for weeks until the repair is finished.

Pantelides' quicker and more cost-effective process involves creating concrete donuts known as "repairs" that are lined with a composite fiber material built around the bottom and top of each column. The material is a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer made of fibers and resin that is stronger than concrete and steel.

First, a number of steel rebars with heads are drilled into the foundation around the column and secured with an epoxy. Then two halves of a circular shell made of the composite fiber (that are just millimeters thick) are placed around the column and rebar and spliced together. Concrete is poured around the column and over the rebar with the composite fiber acting as a mold. The result is a repaired column with approximately the same structural integrity as the original column, Pantelides says.

http://nextbigfuture.com/2016/05/com...-concrete.html
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