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  #1721  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2018, 1:29 PM
marothisu marothisu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glowrock View Post
Are these in inflation-adjusted dollars? If they are, it's good news. If not, then basically all but the top few occupations are pretty much treading water or losing purchasing power...

Aaron (Glowrock)
Not inflation adjusted. Was going to do that but didn't have enough time. Top half ones are okay. Bottom ones aren't necessarily ok. I'll adjust for inflation later.
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  #1722  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2018, 2:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Not inflation adjusted. Was going to do that but didn't have enough time. Top half ones are okay. Bottom ones aren't necessarily ok. I'll adjust for inflation later.
Inflation was 18.1% from 2007 to 2017.
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  #1723  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2018, 3:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Regarding wages, the BLS puts out the OES (Occupational Employment Statistics) by MSA once a year. The last one was for May 2017.

https://www.bls.gov/oes/tables.htm

For the Chicago MSA, all occupations average yearly wage has gone up $9040 May 2017 compared to May 2007. Here is a look at the change in wages per major group:

1. Healthcare practitioners and technical occupations: +$17,110 per year
2. Management occupations: +$15,620 per year
3. Legal occupations: +$13,220 per year
4. Architecture and Engineering occupations: +$13,060 per year
5. Computer and Mathematical occupations: +$12,440 per year
...
What I do falls in category 5.

I graduated from college in 1996. In inflation-adjusted dollars, if we call my 1997 income X, then in 2007, then I earned 65% more in 2007 as compared to 1997. Over the next 12 months, just in my primary career income (I also earn some income from Airbnb and other minor sources), I'll earn 75% more than I did in 2007. I also added a masters degree between 2007 and today, just for additional context.

If I hadn't made the job moves I have over the past 12 months, I'd only be earning about 16% more than I did in 2007. So movement is critical.

Without adjusting for inflation, I was earning about 116% more in 2007 compared to 1997, and in the next 12 months will earn about 110% more than I did in 2007. So there is growth in income there, but I also know that if I hadn't made certain job changes I'd be about 30% lower now. Being willing to take some degree of risk and staying on top of things is important if you want income growth, even in tech.

I also know that I could be earning even more than I do. If I were spending about an extra 10 hours a week on career development, I could probably pull down an additional 50% over what I already earn, and if I were willing to do that plus move to the Bay Area or New York, I could probably earn another 25% over that.

So it really depends on what you're willing to do. In tech, if you have the chops, take risks, and work as hard as doctors do, you can earn more than most doctors do and support a family at an upper-middle-class level on a single income. Or you can have a fairly cush lifestyle for a lot less work and still earn enough to have an upper-middle-class lifestyle as a single person, or if you have dual incomes at that level, for a whole family. It's those families that support the expensive condos downtown, and single-family homes in the city and suburbs that cost between $750k and $1.5k.
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  #1724  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2018, 8:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Not inflation adjusted. Was going to do that but didn't have enough time. Top half ones are okay. Bottom ones aren't necessarily ok. I'll adjust for inflation later.
Don't get me wrong, marothisu, I never expected YOU to do it. I just asked the question so I knew what I was looking at! You've been a treasure trove of amazing information ever since I've moved to Chicago, and likely far longer than that!

Aaron (Glowrock)
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  #1725  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2018, 8:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moorhosj View Post
Inflation was 18.1% from 2007 to 2017.
I've always had my doubts about the inflation rate, especially given things like housing, healthcare, etc... Food isn't markedly more expensive for the most part, consumer goods are generally probably a bit less expensive overall (especially electronics), but, at least in many areas, housing and healthcare, to name two huge ones, are rising much faster than the inflation rate.

I guess the moral of the story is, other than a relatively few professions (and I'd say that MORE SSPers are probably in those specific professions than the average population!), the average wage earner isn't doing much better, if at all, now vs. 2007 or even 1997 in terms of overall income (adjusted for inflation and also presumably years of experience, which is something that can't really be factored into this equation)

Aaron (Glowrock)
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  #1726  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2018, 12:33 AM
marothisu marothisu is offline
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Next Detroit you guys. Isn't this multiple times in a row that this has happened?


Chicago Business Barometer Unexpectedly Indicates Faster Growth In June

https://www.nasdaq.com/article/chica...20180629-00497

Quote:
Chicago-area business activity unexpectedly grew at a faster rate in the month of June, according to a report released by MNI Indicators on Friday.

MNI Indicators said its Chicago business barometer climbed to 64.1 in June from 62.7 in May, with a reading above 50 indicating growth. Economists had expected the index to drop to 60.0.

The unexpected increase by the business barometer was partly due to continued growth by the new orders index, which rose for the second straight month to a five-month high.
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  #1727  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2018, 3:15 AM
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Yes an some other regional PMI's and economic indicators on the East Coast and the South have shown some degree of weakness. The Philly Fed just came in below estimates a week or two ago for example.
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  #1728  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2018, 10:51 PM
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https://www.bizjournals.com/chicago/...-aircraft.html

Boeing is buying Embraer's commercial aircraft business



By Heather Hartel – Correspondent, Chicago Business Journal
8 hours ago

Boeing is taking over the $4.75 billion commercial airplane and services business of Brazil’s Embraer SA.

In a deal announced on Thursday, the two companies agreed to Boeing purchasing a controlling stake in Embraer’s commercial airplane business.
Embraer is the world’s third-largest producer of civil aircraft after European Airbus and Chicago-based Boeing.

The new joint venture should make Boeing a leader in the market for smaller passenger planes.

Under the terms of the deal, Boeing will have an 80 percent ownership stake in the business, with Embraer keeping 20 percent ownership. Boeing’s 80 percent stake is valued at $3.8 billion.
The two companies have been courting a potential deal for months now, with heavy skepticism from the Brazilian government about a U.S. company influencing Brazilian military programs. However,





Management will report directly to Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg.
"By forging this strategic partnership, we will be ideally positioned to generate significant value for both companies' customers, employees and shareholders – and for Brazil and the United States," Muilenburg said.
According to Boeing, the venture is expected to create

...

In addition to this Boeing-Embraer deal, the two companies plan to create another joint venture focused on the KC-390 multi-mission aircraft aimed at developing new markets for defense products.

Boeing Co. (NYSE: BA) is based in Chicago and is the largest exporter in the U.S. by dollar value. Boeing stock is a component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average.
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  #1729  
Old Posted Jul 5, 2018, 11:15 PM
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Last edited by bnk; Jul 6, 2018 at 11:13 AM. Reason: dup
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  #1730  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2018, 2:09 PM
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Check out today’s Crains. A letter from Crains to Amazon regarding HQ2
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  #1731  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2018, 7:21 PM
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Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
Check out today’s Crains. A letter from Crains to Amazon regarding HQ2
Someone has been peeking at SSP It was time for Crains to do a little boosterism. Most of the City Biz rags do nothing but cheer-leading.
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  #1732  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2018, 2:45 PM
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Amid tariffs war, Emanuel heads to China to save $1.3 billion CTA deal

http://www.chicagobusiness.com/artic...llion-cta-deal

from the above article:

Quote:
Also in China, the mayor said he expects to announce new nonstop air service between Chicago and China, and a deal in which the Bank of China will add 40 to 50 jobs here.
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  #1733  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2018, 3:10 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is offline
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Chinese investment in Chicago is still a trickle, but there is a TON we can tap there. The increase in immigration alone could really transform some of our hoods. I’m in Queens right now and it’s astounding—whole swaths have turned Chinese—you don’t see a single white person walking around for blocks.

Chicago will probably never see that much immigration, but we can still see a lot more. I’m hoping the increased internationalization of O’hare will help.
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  #1734  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2018, 3:48 PM
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It's not not happening. We'll just never have that kind of concentration, because there's nothing stopping Chicago's Chinese population from continuing to expand along Archer Ave into increasingly low-density neighborhoods and diluting existing Mexican communities.

The Latino community in McKinley Park, Brighton Park etc does not have the same established institutions and community solidarity that you find in Pilsen, LV or Logan Square to push back against the intrusion of a new group. On the other hand, there's not a "Latino flight" from Bridgeport, McKinley, Brighton either. Latinos in these areas have a similar economic profile to the newcomers, so they aren't being forced out by rising rents. Nor do these Latinos suddenly have higher incomes and can afford to leave for greener pastures. It's a very gradual transition as Chinese investors buy buildings and then market them within the Chinese community. I imagine the more dramatic transitions in NY's outer boroughs happened because the previous group was leaving in large numbers at the same time as Chinese were arriving.

With that being said, the Chinese hoods do have some dense infill that rivals anything on the North Side for density and reminds me of Queens. Just raw dense urban housing with no frills. I did work at a walkup apartment in Armour Square recently, it was way more urban than anything else I've seen in Chicago. 5-story walkup with 12 units on a standard double lot.
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Last edited by ardecila; Jul 7, 2018 at 4:11 PM.
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  #1735  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2018, 3:53 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is offline
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
It's not not happening. We'll just never have that kind of concentration, because there's nothing stopping Chicago's Chinese population from continuing to expand along Archer Ave.
I think that’s what I mean. We already have a nexus in Chinatown, but the growth outward from that hub is a process I would like to see continue.

Flushing, NY is hardly a hub like a Chinatown. It’s basically an entire district of the city with multiple commercial corridors that are heavily Chinese.

My cousin who lives here tells me that 20 years ago this area was all white (I remember seeing it that way), and it dramatically changed before his eyes.
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  #1736  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2018, 4:14 PM
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^ I'd be interested to know what process led the white residents of Flushing to leave in such short order. Generational change? Racism? Gentrification?

I imagine transitions happen more fluidly in neighborhoods that are largely rental vs. owner-occupied. Flushing is still largely rentals, whereas the Chicago neighborhoods we're talking about have a much higher percentage of owner-occupied homes. Even Bridgeport, which is the closest to the Loop, still has many one-story 60s bungalows and 1800s worker cottages. It's much harder to displace a community that owns their own homes.
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  #1737  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2018, 9:38 PM
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I love Flushing because the Chinese food there is vastly superior to that of Manhattan and some places are very legitimately authentic and even considered good if they were located in China (though Manhattan in the last few years has gotten a handful of legit non-Cantonese Chinese places - I'll give them that. Mostly in East Village area too). Last summer, I had an intern of Chinese descent from Flushing who told me when he was growing up, it was all Irish bars and stuff like that, but now where his parents live is mostly Chinese. I think in a way it's similar to Bridgeport in that it went from being pretty white European to not too much. Though Flushing is a lot more Asian and Bridgeport is still a lot more White (30% White in Bridgeport versus 10% in Flushing), but there are other ethnicities in Asia there. I have a few coworkers who are originally from Bangladesh and India who live there too, and I've eaten at Korean restaurants in Flushing, and know there are a number of Koreans there too.

My girlfriend (again who is from China) looooves Flushing and all her friends do too, but none of them live there. Why? I just asked her, and she said first of all it's too far away from the job (Manhattan). She also loves Manhattan for hanging out in various areas, like East Village and Soho, so there's that. She said "If you come all the way to NYC, then you want to hang out with non Chinese people too. If you move to Flushing then it's just all Chinese people and what's the point? You might as well just stay in China." She used to live in Astoria which is kind of halfway between Flushing and Midtown Manhattan. Not many of her friends from China live in Manhattan, but inside of NYC most of them live in Queens - Astoria, Rego Park, Long Island City, Elmhurst, and one lives in Roosevelt Island. A handful of others live in Jersey City, NJ and a few others in places like Union City, NJ. These places in Queens are kind of a compromise between Flushing, their jobs in Manhattan, and areas of Manhattan they love like East Village, Soho, etc. I've almost never hung out with any of her friends in Chinatown - they aren't really big fans of it other than getting cheap groceries at a few markets (which they have in Queens anyway). Inside of NYC at least, Queens is a massive port of entry right now and you will find people from other countries who can afford Manhattan sometimes opt for Queens because of it. I just had a coworker originally from Sri Lanka move from my neighborhood in Manhattan to Queens partially because of this.

In my opinion though, the growth of areas in this regard in Chicago versus NYC is different and more economic. As I've stated before, my girlfriend has told me on numerous occasions "Chinese people love Chicago." By that, I really think she means downtown and some surrounding areas. She has told me that living in a nice high rise for Chinese people, at least younger ones, is much more of a status symbol than say it is for people from India. This type of thing is much more attainable in Chicago downtown than it is in Manhattan. I do believe that a lot of the younger people from China moving to Queens would probably love to live in Manhattan if they could afford living in a luxury high rise, but like most people, can't afford it. Queens or Jersey City is a complete compromise. On the other hand, these same jobs in Chicago will afford way more people the ability to live in a high rise downtown. I think as a result, this is why you see that population opt more for downtown than somewhere like Bridgeport or Chinatown. I see Bridgeport, McKinley Park, Chinatown, etc more as where either families who aren't making a ton of money (i.e. who cannot afford a $700K 3 bedroom condo downtown comfortably) move or where people with not a ton of money move. If the prices in Chicago went up a lot more downtown, you might see some of these areas increase even more. However, I think you'd also see a larger increase in areas like Lincoln Park, Lakeview, West Town, etc to be honest.

If you hang out enough though in areas like East Village, you'll see a lot of Chinese people around. Like yes, they want a taste of home but a lot are just foodies in every sense and love trying new things. A lot of ingredients for home cooking can be found in the markets in Manhattan (and they can be cheap, though they're even cheaper in Flushing). My girlfriend cooks at home a bit as do her friends, and they don't CLAMOR for just any Chinese restaurant. It's usually just the ones that have things they can't make at home or find easily where they end up going out to. I at least get the sense from them that they would totally live in Manhattan if they could and I think in Chicago that type of thing (luxury high rise) is way more attainable.

Last edited by marothisu; Jul 7, 2018 at 10:14 PM.
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  #1738  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2018, 4:56 PM
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South Loop appears to have a pretty large Asian population already. Riding the 4 between UC and Downtown over the last few years, it feels like there has been a significant increase in both East Asian and Indian populations along Michigan between 26th and 31st.
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  #1739  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2018, 7:54 PM
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That's basically Prairie Shores... I thought it had a lot of Asians too, but it's only about a third of the population in the complex according to 2016 ACS data. Lake Meadows is about a quarter Asian and South Commons even less. Compare that to areas west of the Dan Ryan which range from 50-80% Asian.

Asians may account for a higher percentage of the bus riders at Prairie Shores, though, if they are disproportionately likely to work downtown compared to the blacks and whites who also live there. I'm pretty sure everyone gets a parking space, the white people who choose to live there probably do so because they work jobs on the South Side that they likely drive to.
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  #1740  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2018, 8:00 PM
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^ If you remember, I already calculated these populations 6 months ago.

Here's Asian alone population by community area
2016 Asian Alone population by community area
1. West Ridge: 16,753 people
2. Bridgeport: 12,237 people
3. Near West Side: 10,324 people
4. Armour Square: 10,278 people
5. Near North Side: 10,009 people
6. Albany Park: 7946 people
7. Lake View: 6781 people
8. Edgewater: 6580 people
9. The Loop: 6180 people
10. Uptown: 5791 people
11. Near South Side: 5386 people
12. North Park: 5149 people
13. Irving Park: 4672 people
14. Lincoln Square: 4668 people
15. Lincoln Park: 4257 people
16. West Town: 3454 people
17. Brighton Park: 3285 people
18. Hyde Park: 3249 people
19. Rogers Park: 3233 people
20. Portage Park: 2988 people
21. McKinley Park: 2918 people
22. Douglas: 2661 people
23. Jefferson Park: 2627 people
24. Logan Square: 2459 people
25. O'Hare: 2004 people

Between Near North, South, West, and the Loop there are nearly 32,000 people of Asian Alone descent. Add in Bridgeport, Armour Square, Hyde Park, Douglas, Brighton Park, McKinley Park, and Kenwood then it's nearly 70,000 people of Asian Alone descent.



Top Increases, 2010 to 2016. Asian Alone population
1. Near West Side: +3227 people (asian alone)
2. The Loop: +3027 people
3. Near South Side: +2961 people
4. Near North Side: +2937 people
5. Armour Square: +1217 people
6. Albany Park: +1012 people
7. Bridgeport: +963 people
8. Brighton Park: +932 people
9. Douglas: +886 people
10. West Town: +612 people
11. Hyde Park: +522 people
12. Lower West Side: +501 people
13. Jefferson Park: +499 people
14. West Ridge: +448 people
15T. Archer Heights: +443 people
15T. Lake View: +443 people
17. Woodlawn: +417 people
18. Mount Greenwood: +360 people
19. O'Hare: +355 people
20. Lincoln Park: +350 people

Near North, West, South, and the Loop combined increased by over 12,000 people of Asian alone descent from 2010 to 2016. The area of Chinatown, Douglas, Bridgeport, Brighton Park, McKinley Park, Kenwood, Hyde Park, Lower West Side and Woodlawn increased by nearly 6600 people. Nice increase but essentially half of what "downtown" increased at. All of those areas together though had an increase of 19,000 asian alone.


Top Decreases, 2010 to 2016. Asian Alone population
1. Uptown: -1625 people
2. Norwood Park: -601 people
3. Dunning: -409 people
4. Edgewater: -394 people
5. Garfield Ridge: -369 people
6. North Park: -269 people
7T. Forest Glen: -247 people
7T. Morgan Park: -247 people
9. Portage Park: -233 people
10. Ashburn: -159 people
11. Logan Square: -151 people
12. Lincoln Square: -88 people
13. Calumet Heights: -60 people
14T. Belmont Cragin: -53 people
14T. East Garfield Park: -53 people





Here is foreign born for example for just China and India from a post I did 6 months ago:

Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Ask and you shall receive...at least for Born in China and India populations by community area.

Downtown area has about 7000 people born in China now. That's an increase of nearly 3700 people since 2010. Now, if you add in Bridgeport, Armour Square, Brighton Park, McKinley Park, Douglas, Kenwood, and Hyde Park, then there are just over 30,000 people born in China living in that area. An increase of about 8000 people since 2010.

...

Born in China, Change from 2010 to 2016:
1. Near West Side: +1406 people born in China
2. Armour Square: +1350
3. The Loop: +1063
4. Douglas: +816
5. Brighton Park: +629
6. Near South Side: +621
7. Bridgeport: +588
8. Near North Side: +579
9. Kenwood: +535
10. Hyde Park: +334
11. Archer Heights: +235
12. Lincoln Park: +189
13. New City (Back of the Yards): +187
14. Lake View: +164
15. Albany Park: +161
16. Norwood Park: +159
17. Lincoln Square: +124
18. Dunning: +122
19. West Elsdon: +119
20. West Town: +102

2016 By Total Number of People Born in China
1. Bridgeport: 8300 people born in China
2. Armour Square: 7567
3. Near West Side: 2609
4. Brighton Park: 2083
5. McKinley Park: 1949
6. Near North Side: 1655
7. The Loop: 1646
8. Douglas: 1222
9. Hyde Park: 1191
10. Near South Side: 1054
11. Lake View: 837
12. Kenwood: 746
13. West Ridge: 555
14. Edgewater: 543
15. Lincoln Park: 540
16. New City (Back of the Yards): 470
17. Albany Park: 405
18. Uptown: 392
19. Rogers Park 356
20. Lincoln Square: 277


Born in India, Change from 2010 to 2016:
1. Near North Side: +572 people born in India
2. Loop: +488
3. North Park: +469
4. Edgewater: +314
5. Near South Side: +304
6. Albany Park: +233
7. Douglas: +224
8. Rogers Park: +203
9. Near West Side: +186
10. Lincoln Park: +125
11. West Ridge: +121
12. North Center: +120
13. Lake View: +105
14. Austin: +82
15. Woodlawn: +80
16. Lower West Side: +78
17. Edison Park: +76
18. Montclare: +73
19. South Lawndale: +53
20. Hyde Park: +49

2016 By Total Number of People Born in India
1. West Ridge: 3437 people born in India
2. Near West Side: 1916
3. Near North Side: 1829
4. Albany Park: 1368
5. Edgewater: 1276
6. The Loop: 1204
7. Lake View: 1000
8. North Park: 970
9. Douglas: 618
10. Near South Side: 617
11. Lincoln Park: 463
12. Lincoln Square: 444
13. O'Hare: 432
14. Uptown: 413
15. Irving Park: 412
16. Rogers Park: 396
17. Hyde Park: 313
18. Forest Glen: 241
19. West Town: 233
20. North Center: 218

Last edited by marothisu; Jul 8, 2018 at 8:38 PM.
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