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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 1:33 PM
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Smile NEW YORK | 80 Flatbush (2 Towers) | 920 FT / 480 FT | 74 & 38 FLOORS

http://ny.curbed.com/2017/4/3/151693...oy-80-flatbush

Massive Downtown Brooklyn project will include 900 apartments, schools, cultural space
The two-tower development will pierce the skyline but bring needed public infrastructure to the neighborhood







BY ZOE ROSENBERG
APR 3, 2017


Quote:
Alloy Development has revealed a plan to bring two schools, a cultural institution, office space, retail, and 900 mixed-income apartments to a full-block site at the confluence of Boerum Hill, Downtown Brooklyn, and Fort Greene. The project, known as 80 Flatbush, was conceived of by the development company as a response to a critical need for new public infrastructure in the area, and is also a reaction to the booming local real estate market. “Downtown Brooklyn has been growing quickly but there hasn’t been a lot of public infrastructure,” Jared Della Valle, CEO of Alloy, told Curbed. “This is an opportunity to be critical of what’s built and its specific context.”

The triangular site that’s bound by Third, State, and Schermerhorn streets and Flatbush Avenue will be built out over two phases. In addition to a 38-story residential building, the first phase will include two schools—a 350-seat elementary school and a new 350-seat location for the site’s existing Khalil Gibran International Academy, which currently holds 260 seats in a building constructed in 1860 as a Civil War infirmary. The schools are expected to welcome students by 2022.

The former Civil War infirmary, however, will not be razed for the new development. “The idea that we would start fresh and wipe out the whole block was not a good proposition,” Della Valle told Curbed. He says that Alloy has been quietly approaching neighbors of the site for months, gathering intel on what kind of change they would, and would not, like to see in the neighborhood. “In order to build to this scale, there needs to be a public benefit that comes with that,” Della Valle says.

One of the biggest expressions from neighbors the firm noted is preservation of the site’s historic structures. To that end, Alloy plans to convert the existing Khalil Gibran Academy—the former Civil War infirmary—into a 15,000-square-foot cultural facility that Alloy hopes will act as an extension of the BAM Cultural District across Flatbush Avenue. An RFP will determine what will eventually come to the site, but Della Valle notes that what will be chosen will be “nothing that’s competitive with, but something that’s synergistic to” the surrounding cultural institutions.

The second of the site’s buildings that will be preserved in the new complex is at the corner of Third Avenue and Schermerhorn Street. The late 19th-century building will give way to retail space for the neighborhood and amenity space for the residential occupants. “It's rare for a developer to come to us for feedback in the earliest stages of a project,” Peg Breen, president of the New York Landmarks Conservancy, said in a statement. “This project shows that development and preservation can work together and that investing in historic buildings makes economic sense.”

To bring 900 mixed-income apartments and 200,000-square-feet of Class A office space to the neighborhood, Alloy will have to build up. In addition to the 38-story, 480-foot tower of phase one, the plan calls for a 74-story, 920-foot tower that will be home to market rate apartments, the complex’s 200 below-market rate apartments, and office space. This will be part of the project’s second phase, which is expected to be complete by 2025.

Alloy is working with the Educational Construction Fund, a state-run entity that helps fund the development of new schools in New York City, to develop the properties. Della Valle notes that the city will not be funding this project. Instead, revenue created by the non-school portions of the project will pay for the bonds floated by the state to build the schools.

“This is a meaningful investment for our students, their families and the entire school community,” Khalil Gibran’s principal Winston Hamann said in a statement. “The new state-of-the-art facilities will provide an incredible opportunity for students to learn, grow and thrive, and allow us to remain devoted to serving this wonderful community for many years to come."

Similarly, the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership is on board with the development. “This is exactly the type of project Downtown Brooklyn needs: one that delivers critically needed schools, along with cultural facilities, affordable housing and Class A office space," Regina Myer, President of the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, said in a statement. "Downtown Brooklyn should grow intelligently, and I hope this project sets a template for the future.”


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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 1:38 PM
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 1:43 PM
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Wow, another huge project for downtown BK. Looks good, and nice to see schools and cultural facilities as part of the project.

As a nearby resident with a baby, there is serious school overcrowding in this part of BK.
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 1:53 PM
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Resized images...














This will be bigger than the 590 Atlantic proposal, building a nice closter along Flatbush.

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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 1:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Wow, another huge project for downtown BK. Looks good, and nice to see schools and cultural facilities as part of the project.

As a nearby resident with a baby, there is serious school overcrowding in this part of BK.





Because I like aerials, a larger expanded view. At the very bottom is the site of 590 Atlantic Avenue, another major development for BK.
If they could add that to the rendering, as well as the towers that will rise just accross the Manhattan Bridge, you get another idea of just
how much the skyline is expanding.


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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 3:54 PM
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Thumbs down

Another boxy square top that is hundreds of feet tall. With regards to its façade, I could not think of a worse muse than 432 Park Ave; the low standard in supertall design.
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 4:25 PM
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Another boxy square top that is hundreds of feet tall. With regards to its façade, I could not think of a worse muse than 432 Park Ave; the low standard in supertall design.
I don't think it looks anything at all like 432 Park Avenue. I do like the facade of the smaller tower better. The taller tower looks more office than residential (both will have a small office component).

I love that this development is so close to transit (multiple subway lines and the LIRR), so no need for bulky parking podiums at the base. It really is a small footprint for everything involved, keeping with the density of the area..
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 5:31 PM
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I love it. Sometimes with a simple move like that angled wall a building becomes so much more interesting. The materials look quality also.
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 5:35 PM
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Downtown Brooklyn's architecture is creeping slowly out of the bargain basement. Still an uninspired design, but better than the garbage of the past decade.
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 9:26 PM
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Originally Posted by vandelay View Post
Downtown Brooklyn's architecture is creeping slowly out of the bargain basement. Still an uninspired design, but better than the garbage of the past decade.
I agree with that also. The design is not something to make me jump out of my seat, but the development as a whole is something to be excited about. The maturing of the area into something it should have been all along is exciting to see. I do like the twist of the tallest tower, which is what grabs the eye when you look at it.



http://www.politico.com/states/new-y...rooklyn-110965

Massive, mixed-use development planned for Downtown Brooklyn
Schools, housing, retail and office space, cultural center proposed


By SALLY GOLDENBERG
04/03/17


Quote:
A massive, mixed-use project that would reshape the Brooklyn skyline is being proposed along Flatbush Avenue, adjacent to Atlantic Terminal.

Brooklyn-based Alloy Development plans to build two new schools, 900 housing units, 200,000 square feet of Class A office space, 40,000 square feet of retail and a 15,000 square-foot cultural center. If the project is approved as proposed, one of the residential towers on the 61,400-square-foot site would stand at 920 feet, making it one of the tallest in the borough.

The project, known as 80 Flatbush, was unveiled to reporters Monday afternoon ahead of a public meeting at Brooklyn Borough Hall, where City Councilman Steve Levin and a group he convened were being briefed on the plans. The developer will need Levin's support to rezone the site.

Levin did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Alloy's proposal sprung from a city request seeking plans to redevelop the Khalil Gibran International Academy on Schermerhorn Street.

Recognizing an opportunity to do more than just rehabilitate an aging school building, the company bought up surrounding sites as it drew up a far more dramatic blueprint for the area.

The school would be replaced by a more modern building that could hold 350 students, more than the 260 or so who attend Khalil Gibran, Alloy representatives said. A second elementary school on State Street would house another 350 students. Both are expected to be in operation by 2022, assuming the lengthy approval process for the rezoning gets underway this fall as planned.

Alloy CEO Jared Della Valle said the existing buildings housing Khalil Gibran students were built in the late 1800s and do not have a gymnasium or auditorium.

"It's so important that KGIA (Khalil Gibran International Academy) has the facilities that it needs for students to thrive, and we're deeply appreciative that this project will provide that," Rawaa Nancy Albilal, president and CEO of the Arab American Family Support Center, said in a statement released by Alloy.

The housing units would be rented to tenants earning a range of incomes: 700 would be rented at market-rate and 200 would be restricted to those earning, on average, 60 percent of the area median income, Della Valle said. He said he does not expect to receive any city subsidy for the rent-restricted units, but is banking on the revival of the 421-a property tax break.

The Educational Construction Fund, an arm of the city's Department of Education, is the applicant for the project.

"We remain dedicated to identifying opportunities to support aging schools and helping to create additional capacity for New York City public school students without using capital dollars," Jennifer Maldonado, executive director of the fund, said in a statement.


Alloy would not release the project's overall price tag, but Della Valle said the schools would cost about $100 million.

The city would turn over the portion of the site it owns to the developer in a 99-year ground lease, and Alloy would pay rent and other tax-equivalent fees to the city to support bonds for the construction of the schools. Della Valle did not disclose the amount in rent or other payments, saying he is "under a confidential agreement with the city."

The project would appear to meet a number of community needs, though nearly every major rezoning in the city is met with some measure of community resistance.

"There's always anxiety about development and change and all those things, but our feeling is, if every public project came with a public school or a hospital or some other need, we wouldn't be talking about that," Della Valle said. "If not here, where? It's not like we're in the middle of nowhere. We're at the intersection of Flatbush and Atlantic."



Letter from Alloy:








The Plan:







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  #11  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 10:07 PM
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Now this is a project that can help build the community. Has a hell of an offer with schools, culture space, 900 apartments, infrastructure improvements, and Class A space.

A lesson to other developers hint hint!

Schools and infrastructure improvements are like seroquel to a NIMBY. It just makes them happy.
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 10:12 PM
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Schools and infrastructure improvements are like seroquel to a NIMBY. It just makes them happy.
I'm sure some will still come out against it when they start the approvals process. They'll make a little noise. Complain about the tower's height, etc. But like the massive tower on the Upper Eastside, its a big win for the city.

I think the tallest tower strikes a balance with 9 DeKalb. I wouldn't want a similar tower at this site. The difference in designs allows the two towers to play well off each other.
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2017, 10:19 PM
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I'm sure some will still come out against it when they start the approvals process. They'll make a little noise. Complain about the tower's height, etc. But like the massive tower on the Upper Eastside, its a big win for the city.

I think the tallest tower strikes a balance with 9 DeKalb. I wouldn't want a similar tower at this site. The difference in designs allows the two towers to play well off each other.
I agree totally... and kudos to the developers for beating the NIMBYs to the punch with an awesome educational/infrastructural element. Saving the old infirmary building too as a cultural destination... the taller one balances out with 9 DeKalb so well and great that both are not just meant for the superluxury end. It adds a little flair even if it is still kind of conservative with that twist on the taller one.Another thing to look forward too... Brooklyn isn't playing anymore!
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Old Posted Apr 5, 2017, 12:36 AM
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L21uZPAeBk

atlantic and flatbush is the most under utilized space in the city. Fantastic transit access, close to prospect park, lots of beautiful tree-lined brownstone-y streets and great restaurants and pubs.
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Old Posted Apr 5, 2017, 1:02 AM
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Remember back in the day the whole Atlantic Yards debate regarding the Williamsburg Bank Tower and how ONLY it should be the tallest in the borough. Fast forward 6 years and look at whats to come, and... what has risen. Borough continues to climb the ladder.
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Old Posted Apr 5, 2017, 1:53 AM
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Originally Posted by dumbo View Post
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7L21uZPAeBk

atlantic and flatbush is the most under utilized space in the city. Fantastic transit access, close to prospect park, lots of beautiful tree-lined brownstone-y streets and great restaurants and pubs.
I agree. I always consider it to be like Penn Station in that regard.



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Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
Remember back in the day the whole Atlantic Yards debate regarding the Williamsburg Bank Tower and how ONLY it should be the tallest in the borough. Fast forward 6 years and look at whats to come, and... what has risen. Borough continues to climb the ladder.
A lesson on why you don't listen to knee-jerk NIMBYism.
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Old Posted Apr 5, 2017, 2:28 AM
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This is a great project. However, it is a little concerning that it will need to go through ULURP to rezone the site.
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Old Posted Apr 5, 2017, 4:14 PM
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This is a great project. However, it is a little concerning that it will need to go through ULURP to rezone the site.

Keep in mind this is a public project, and they've already been working with Landmarks. The affordable housing is there, as well as schools. There's nothing for NIMBYs to fall back on. There will be the usual noise, but they're already getting what they could reasonably ask for.
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Old Posted Apr 7, 2017, 3:18 AM
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Knew these guys would be on it sooner or later...


http://atlanticyardsreport.blogspot....ject-huge.html

Proposed 80 Flatbush project a huge increase in bulk over Downtown rezoning; harbinger of Site 5 project?









April 5, 2017


Quote:
Maybe the massive two-tower project proposed as 80 Flatbush, across from BAM, 300 Ashland, and Atlantic Terminal, a good idea. Maybe it's not.

It sure comes with velocity, a press release indicating support from the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and even the New York Landmarks Conservancy.

But it's definitely a very big idea, 1.3 million gross square feet over two main buildings, one 920 feet tall, on a 61,000 square-foot plot of land bordered by Flatbush and Third avenues and Schermerhorn and State streets.

It would be the second-tallest building in Brooklyn. And the square footage means a Floor Area Ratio (FAR)--bulk as multiple of lot size--of 18. That would represent a dramatic increase from the current FAR of 6, which emerged from the 2004 Downton Brooklyn Rezoning, not to mention the maximum Downtown Brooklyn FAR of 12.

Given that dramatic shift--and some opacity regarding the financial aspects--it's not surprising this 80 Flatbush has been presented as a plan for a mixed-use development including two new public schools, market-rate and affordable housing, commercial and even cultural space.

The key elected official, Council Member Steve Levin, told Gothamist he's "eager to see what the public response is" and indicated his own leanings: "I would say that it is a somewhat different scenario than just a private development going for an 18-FAR because it has significant public benefit."

The site needs a spot rezoning, hearings under the Uniform Land Use Review Procedures (ULURP) and an environmental impact statement (EIS). Don't be surprised if the Council Member comes armed with some community "asks" and the developer pares back the proposal for a "win-win."

The headline in the press release was New York City Educational Construction Fund Selects Alloy Development to Build Two New Schools in Downtown Brooklyn. Indeed, the Educational Construction Fund, which finances and develops new public schools, chose Alloy after a response to request for expressions of interest.

What the press release didn't say is that Alloy was chosen to build the giant project announced. It hasn't. Rather, it proposed a project it believes economically viable.

Atlantic Yards echo?

For Atlantic Yards watchers, the development has echoes of the two-tower project floated--but not yet formally proposed--for Site 5, now home to P.C. Richard and Modell's, involving the shift of bulk approved for what's now the arena plaza across the street.

At 1.1 million square feet and up to 785 feet tall, the Site 5 project might be presented a slightly more modest than 80 Flatbush. Actually, given that the Site 5 project would be on a smaller plot, at 48,655 square feet, the FAR could exceed 22.


Both projects would, on one flank, border a narrow street with row houses: Site 5 bordering Pacific Street and 80 Flatbush bordering State Street. The Brooklyn Paper, identifying 80 Flatbush as "on the eastern edge of very low-rise Boerum Hill," suggested neighbors would oppose it.

“It’s a massive project,” Boerum Hill Association Howard Kolins said. “Virtually nothing (in the proposal) is a benefit for people living there. You have to brace yourself for a large high rise that you’d rather not be there.”


Actually, 80 Flatbush overlaps neighborhoods. While this New York Times article identifies the site as the northeast tip of Boerum Hill, it was included in the 2004 Downtown Brooklyn rezoning.

If the 80 Flatbush template proves successful, the developer of Site 5 might have to come up with some educational or cultural use to draw focus from the increase in bulk. While Site 5 is being promoted as an iconic office building--though some versions suggested would have more apartments--80 Flatbush would be predominantly residential, with 200,000 square feet of office space.

Structure of the deal

Such projects take a while. Alloy anticipates construction of 80 Flatbush starting no earlier than 2019, with Phase 1 (schools and smaller, triangular tower) finished by 2022 and Phase 2 (larger tower and rehabilitation of existing structures) not until 2025. There'd be 700 market-rate units and 200 affordable ones for low-income households earning 60 percent of Area Median Income, according to Politico.

ECF selected Alloy as the developer of the proposed project, and will be co-applicant with Alloy on the ULURP application. The proposal includes 120,000 gross square feet (gsf) of new schools, with the taller building 730,000 gsf and the smaller one 430,000 gsf.

(By the way, the 1,066-foot supertall tower planned near Junior's, the borough's tallest, would be relatively narrow and contain 556,164 square feet.)

Alloy, explained spokesman James Yolles, now owns about 75% of the site and New York City owns about 25%. Alloy has agreed to build two new schools (funded by bonds floated by ECF), build a 200,000 square foot residential portion--all market-rate--in the first tower, and lease that space for 99 years, with the ground rent and tax equivalency payments covering debt service on the bonds. The city would put up no capital funds.

Alloy CEO Jared Della Valle told Politico he would not disclose the amount his company would pay, saying he is "under a confidential agreement with the city." Yolles told me "Alloy is currently in active discussions with ECF around the project site."

The schools would be separate structures in the middle of the block. The lower school entrance would be on State State street, the high school on Flatbush Avenue, with shared facilities (cafeteria, gym) connecting them in the middle.

The obligation to ECF is satisfied once the schools and Non-School Portion are finished, Yolles said, but the "feasibility of the entire project is linked."

In a letter, Della Valle and colleague AJ Pires called "80 Flatbush is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to contribute to the borough’s identity," adding that talking with neighbors "helped us recognize that two existing buildings... merit preservation and incorporation into the master plan" and that a cluster of buildings would be superior to a "single building on a large podium." Easier to finance, too, I'd bet.
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Old Posted Apr 7, 2017, 3:29 PM
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I don't think it looks anything at all like 432 Park Avenue. I do like the facade of the smaller tower better. The taller tower looks more office than residential (both will have a small office component).
I wasn't referring to the smaller tower I was referring to the taller one. The evenly-spaced square within a square is very much a 432 Park Avenue element and IMO its very unappealing and looks lazy no matter what material is used.
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