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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 9:19 PM
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US and 50 States GDP, Q2 2016-Q2 2017

From bea.gov

The last 6 quarters have been solid. Not China growth, but exceptional vs most of the west.

This is the GDP from Q2 2016-Q2 2017
United States GDP Q2 2017: $19,134,866,000,000

GDP By State, Q2 2017
California $2,716,655,000,000
Texas $1,677,944,000,000
New York $1,539,081,000,000
Florida $964,880,000,000
Illinois $812,431,000,000
Pennsylvania $741,620,000,000
Ohio $646,657,000,000
New Jersey $585,726,000,000
Georgia $551,714,000,000
North Carolina $538,769,000,000
Massachusetts $523,348,000,000
Michigan $511,196,000,000
Virginia $508,202,000,000
Washington $499,960,000,000
Maryland $393,205,000,000
Indiana $357,221,000,000
Minnesota $352,049,000,000
Tennessee $342,590,000,000
Colorado $338,252,000,000
Wisconsin $322,032,000,000
Arizona $318,033,000,000
Missouri $305,141,000,000
Connecticut $260,124,000,000
Louisiana $242,060,000,000
Oregon $236,102,000,000
South Carolina $217,507,000,000
Alabama $213,657,000,000
Kentucky $203,314,000,000
Oklahoma $188,846,000,000
Iowa $188,076,000,000
Utah $165,086,000,000
Nevada $151,983,000,000
Kansas $151,760,000,000
District of Columbia $130,987,000,000
Arkansas $126,622,000,000
Nebraska $118,892,000,000
Mississippi $111,700,000,000
New Mexico $97,802,000,000
Hawaii $87,388,000,000
New Hampshire $79,030,000,000
West Virginia $76,836,000,000
Delaware $74,224,000,000
Idaho $71,407,000,000
Maine $61,006,000,000
Rhode Island $58,911,000,000
North Dakota $55,223,000,000
Alaska $51,828,000,000
South Dakota $48,555,000,000
Montana $47,349,000,000
Wyoming $40,931,000,000
Vermont $31,874,000,000
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Last edited by dimondpark; Dec 1, 2017 at 5:01 PM. Reason: fixed MA and NJ
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  #2  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 9:27 PM
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Massachusetts is on there 2X with two different figures...
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 9:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
Massachusetts is on there 2X with two different figures...
Fixed it. Thanks for catching that.
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 9:34 PM
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California has roughly the same GDP as Alabama, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Iowa, Utah, Nevada, Kansas, District of Columbia, Arkansas, Nebraska, Mississippi, New Mexico, Hawaii, New Hampshire, West Virginia, Delaware, Idaho, Maine, Vermont, North Dakota, Alaska, South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and Vermont combined.
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 9:54 PM
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That is because California has a larger population than all those states combined.
I have noticed states usually rank about the same by GDP as theydo by population.
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 10:04 PM
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That is because California has a larger population than all those states combined.
I have noticed states usually rank about the same by GDP as theydo by population.
Yep, big surprise, right?
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 10:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BnaBreaker View Post
California has roughly the same GDP as Alabama, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Iowa, Utah, Nevada, Kansas, District of Columbia, Arkansas, Nebraska, Mississippi, New Mexico, Hawaii, New Hampshire, West Virginia, Delaware, Idaho, Maine, Vermont, North Dakota, Alaska, South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and Vermont combined.
It is laughable. Their GDP's almost as high as that of my entire (egalitarian) country, while our population's almost twice as big.

Make no mistake. We've been better off with the porn industry relocated to Hollywood anyway.
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 10:12 PM
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That is because California has a larger population than all those states combined.
I have noticed states usually rank about the same by GDP as theydo by population.
I guess it has nothing to do with our diversified, strong economy?

If GDP should follow population rank, wouldn't DC be more towards the bottom?
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 10:30 PM
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Did the gap between IL and PA grow? I thought they were neck and neck for a while. I'm surprised by how close FL are IL are given the differences in population. Ohio is surprising as well.
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 10:36 PM
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Did the gap between IL and PA grow? I thought they were neck and neck for a while. I'm surprised by how close FL are IL are given the differences in population. Ohio is surprising as well.
i've never thought of florida as an economic powerhouse...or at least some place people go for white collar/higher paying positions. everyone that i know under 65 that has moved there has been in the military (or otherwise govt) or didn't have a college degree.
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 10:49 PM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
I guess it has nothing to do with our diversified, strong economy?

If GDP should follow population rank, wouldn't DC be more towards the bottom?
DC has the US government. Not really fair to compare.
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 10:52 PM
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Originally Posted by IrishIllini View Post
Did the gap between IL and PA grow? I thought they were neck and neck for a while. I'm surprised by how close FL are IL are given the differences in population. Ohio is surprising as well.
Keep in mind that about 70% (if not more) of Illinois' GDP comes from the metropolitan Chicago area. Whereas Florida is spread out between four major areas: Miami/SE Florida, Tampa Bay, Orlando, Jacksonville/NE Florida, as well as smaller metropolitan areas. While none of those four primary areas in FL are individually as large as Chicagoland, they are larger when combined together, which is reflected in the figures shown.

Btw, great list, dimondpark - I'm always fascinated by this type of data.
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 11:05 PM
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Most of the West? I've heard Europe is starting to catch up now, they'll probably outpace us.
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 11:11 PM
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Most of the West? I've heard Europe is starting to catch up now, they'll probably outpace us.
Real GDP has picked up in Europe and I believe been stronger than the US for the last year or so. The big difference is that the US has stronger population growth, mainly due to immigration.
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2017, 11:34 PM
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Keep in mind that about 70% (if not more) of Illinois' GDP comes from the metropolitan Chicago area. Whereas Florida is spread out between four major areas: Miami/SE Florida, Tampa Bay, Orlando, Jacksonville/NE Florida, as well as smaller metropolitan areas. While none of those four primary areas in FL are individually as large as Chicagoland, they are larger when combined together, which is reflected in the figures shown.

Btw, great list, dimondpark - I'm always fascinated by this type of data.
How great is the effect of a metro areas size on the overall state's GDP? GDP is mostly correlated with population. There are a few outliers, but I find it surprising that FL is more comparable to IL than NY given it's 7m+ people larger than IL. I understand it's not the premier business center in the US, but the numbers are still surprising.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 12:27 AM
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That is because California has a larger population than all those states combined.
I have noticed states usually rank about the same by GDP as theydo by population.
Massachusetts really kills it then, eh?
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 2:50 AM
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Don't forget how industrial the Midwest still is. I drive all over the Midwest to visit family and the industrial base is still here, it's just automated and spread all over the countryside. There are massive industrial plants scattered out in the middle of Illinois or along the Mississippi. Even the low density parts of a state like Illinois or Iowa have relatively intense economic uses. Huge parts of a place like Florida are wilderness or just devoted to the hospitality/retirement trade. In Illinois you might wander across a huge industrial complex surrounded by farm fields crossed by railways with wind turbines as far as you can see. That is going to generate a lot more economic activity than a giant swamp full of alligators with tourism industry and retirement communities interspersed in it.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 2:58 AM
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Don't forget how industrial the Midwest still is. I drive all over the Midwest to visit family and the industrial base is still here, it's just automated and spread all over the countryside. There are massive industrial plants scattered out in the middle of Illinois or along the Mississippi. Even the low density parts of a state like Illinois or Iowa have relatively intense economic uses. Huge parts of a place like Florida are wilderness or just devoted to the hospitality/retirement trade. In Illinois you might wander across a huge industrial complex surrounded by farm fields crossed by railways with wind turbines as far as you can see. That is going to generate a lot more economic activity than a giant swamp full of alligators with tourism industry and retirement communities interspersed in it.
I think people forget this when they discuss how moribund the rustbelt is. It’s still an extremely wealthy region by global standards, it’s just that that wealth is far less broadly distributed than it was 40 years ago
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 1:56 PM
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Vermont is on there 2x. The "bigger" Vermont should be Rhode Island.

California, Texas and New York...if they were countries would be among the largest economies in the world.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 2:59 PM
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I thought the idea of GDP rank vs. Population rank was interesting so I made the following table. The 2016 population ranks came from Wikipedia and are the Census Bureau's July 1, 2016 estimates. States with the same over/under number are ordered alphabetically. I also corrected the Vermont/Rhode Island issue JManc noted above in the OP's GDP column.

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