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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 2:24 AM
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Newfoundland and Labrador's influence elsewhere in Canada and around the world

Many on here often discuss differences between Newfoundland and Labrador and the rest of Canada. But how is Newfoundland and Labrador in general seen by you, by the people where you live and what influence does the province have on you and where you live?

The influence could be cultural, artistic, political, economic, business, societal and more.

If you live in Newfoundland and Labrador, tell us what others thought of you or how you were treated when travelling in the rest of Canada or in another country when you said you are from Newfoundland and Labrador. (I realize that you may have said that you are from just "Newfoundland" or just "Labrador.")
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 2:38 AM
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I'm studying in Montreal right now. A surprising amount of people don't recognize the word Newfoundland, though I'm not sure if they're more familiar with french term Terre-Neuve. Also locals say that Newfie jokes are big here, but I haven't overheard any.

The reaction is universally positive, so I think we're viewed in good light.

Had people in Maine snapping photos of our license plates... so I guess we're a rare sight down that way!
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 2:56 AM
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I think our biggest outside cultural influence is political comedy. Wonderful Grand Band led to CODCO led to This Hour Has 22 Minutes/The Daily Show/Colbert, etc. We started that, a decade before it was even considered acceptable anywhere else.

We tend to dominate anglophone CBC. Even when I lived in Winnipeg, the morning show was Gordon Pinsent reading local stories from here.

Beyond that... meh. Insignificant. We mostly have our own reaction to stuff. Mrs. Brown's Boys is huge, Heartland I only know because of the flash adds on CBC's website. Neither is ours, but we have a perspective.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 3:06 AM
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Nfld. had little influence on the world, even when it was an independent entity, with it's small population it existed largely as a geographical outline on a map, a source of fish, a cold and barren wasteland, home of native peoples and eccentric frontier fisher people, a curiosity with lighthouses and sea shanties. It was about as well known as a Caribbean Island or a small African country. Today as a part of Canada it has even less influence. Mississauga and Richmond are better known in the world.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 3:16 AM
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Nfld. had little influence on the world, even when it was an independent entity, with it's small population it existed largely as a geographical outline on a map, a source of fish, a cold and barren wasteland, home of native peoples and eccentric frontier fisher people, a curiosity with lighthouses and sea shanties. It was about as well known as a Caribbean Island or a small African country. Today as a part of Canada it has even less influence.
Agreed.

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Mississauga and Richmond are better known in the world.
Completely disagreed. A lot of people in Boston, most people in Ireland, and basically all people in Portugal know Newfoundland. That, alone, beats Mississauga and Richmond by many orders of magnitude.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 3:17 AM
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^ People in India and China know Mississauga and Richmond better. More people live there than in Boston, Portugal, and Ireland. Those are the places with strong connections. I had a taxi driver here ask me "where is this New place you came from? Is it in Canada?"
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 3:24 AM
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^ People in India and China know Mississauga and Richmond better. More people live there than in Boston and Ireland. I had a taxi driver here ask me "where is this new place you came from? Is it in Canada?"
Sure, it's exactly the same. Everyone in India has relatives who fished in Mississauga, or who married a girl from Richmond. All of their billion people do, and Mississauga permeates Indian culture to the same extent Newfoundland does Portugal. I mean, Mississauga was even named by the Portuguese just like St. John's, because it the same shape as a city in the Basque country. Completely equal comparison. There's a statue of Gandhi outside Mississauga City Hall, just like there's one of Gaspar Corte Real outside our Confederation Building. And the main church in Mississauga has a statue that was, likewise, carried through the streets by Indians, just like the Portuguese did here, in one of the most well-attended processions in the city's history.

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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 3:26 AM
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Sure, it's exactly the same. Everyone in India has relatives who fished in Mississauga, or who married a girl from Richmond. All of their billion people do, and Mississauga permeates Indian culture to the same extent Newfoundland does Portugal.

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Yes, it may be better known in parts of Europe, as you are saying. I thought to say Vancouver and Toronto would be too obvious and not so funny. I am sure that in the 16th century Newfoundland was more well known than it is today.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 3:33 AM
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Yes, it may be better known in parts of Europe, as you are saying. I thought to say Vancouver and Toronto would be too obvious and not so funny. I am sure that in the 16th century Newfoundland was more well known than it is today.
Me too but you're implying Mississauga or Richmond are more well known today, right now, than Newfoundland? Seriously? They're not even as well known in Canada, let alone worldwide, where we actually have a handful of places for which we are an integral part of the folklore and culture. Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, United Kingdom, Portugal... they all know us to some extent, and I doubt any of them have ever heard of Mississauga or Richmond unless they've been there.

You're severely underestimating us, by any objective standard.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 3:39 AM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
Me too but you're implying Mississauga or Richmond are more well known today, right now, than Newfoundland? Seriously? They're not even as well known in Canada, let alone worldwide, where we actually have a handful of places for which we are an integral part of the folklore and culture. Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, United Kingdom, Portugal... they all know us to some extent, and I doubt any of them have ever heard of Mississauga or Richmond unless they've been there.

You're severely underestimating us, by any objective standard.
To be precise, yes, I am actually speculating that in some parts of the world, Newfoundland & Labrador is not known much at all (judging from my own anecdotal evidence), and places such as Mississauga and Richmond are actually better known because they are a popular destination of immigrants. On Google, "Newfoundland" gets over 19 million results, and "Mississauga" gets over 17 million results.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 4:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
Me too but you're implying Mississauga or Richmond are more well known today, right now, than Newfoundland? Seriously? They're not even as well known in Canada, let alone worldwide, where we actually have a handful of places for which we are an integral part of the folklore and culture. Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, United Kingdom, Portugal... they all know us to some extent, and I doubt any of them have ever heard of Mississauga or Richmond unless they've been there.

You're severely underestimating us, by any objective standard.
There is a palpable eagerness in Canada to establish equivalencies and even hierarchies between immigrant-related contemporary realities on the one hand and some of the older foundational traits of the country on the other.

I am often at a loss to explain it, but it's hard to deny its existence.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 4:32 AM
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There is a palpable eagerness in Canada to establish equivalencies and even hierarchies between immigrant-related contemporary realities on the one hand and some of the older foundational traits of the country on the other.

I am often at a loss to explain it, but it's hard to deny its existence.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 4:36 AM
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People don't give much thought to Newfoundland here. The Quebec-Newfoundland animosity over Churchill Falls is basically a one-way thing (coming from NL) and most people wouldn't even be aware of it.

There is a bit of a tinge of bitterness over the 1927 border dispute involving Labrador though, but that's really only among a small number of history and politics geeks.

Overall NL is viewed fairly positively, maybe with a subtle tinge of condescension that people often treat people stereotyped as "simple" with.

(Simple in the sense of uncomplicated, not of being dumb.)

Worth noting also that Newfoundland's distinctiveness from the rest of Anglo-Canada is not really something that is on most people's radar in Quebec.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 4:56 AM
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Many on here often discuss differences between Newfoundland and Labrador and the rest of Canada. But how is Newfoundland and Labrador in general seen by you, by the people where you live and what influence does the province have on you and where you live?
From our point of view here, we might as well merge the newest two threads because the answer will be the same, both Newfoundland and Okotoks are completely off the radar and have zero impact on anything.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 5:34 AM
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I was going to wait awhile but I have to cut in. I've been to almost all of the island of Newfoundland and a bit of Labrador so I know a lot about NL. I also have some friends in Timmins who are originally from NL.

So some things largely influenced by Newfoundlanders elsewhere in Canada:

-Fort McMurray, AB is the obvious one

-oil industry in Western Canada

-quite a few in mining including here in Timmins

-Mary Brown's restaurants LOL

-when I was in Jamaica at a market they were happy to tell me they were selling fish from Newfoundland and that many of their dishes are made from it

-fish and seafood from NL is exported to a number of countries that most people don't realize. In the past, cod was a huge export to parts of Europe and elsewhere.

And a kind of different one:

The red Adirondack chair (some call them Muskoka chairs) campaign for Parks Canada began in Gros Morne National Park at the beginning of the decade. Today, pretty much every national park and historical site has those chairs placed at various places.
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  #16  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 12:37 PM
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I've never been to NewFoundland and only know people from there through coworkers that know people from there, or friends of friends ie, someone I use to play volleyball with husband is from there...

Cod fishery collapse, Hibernia oil and Paul McCartney protesting baby seal harvesting is about the most I can think of on my own without wiki.

Other than that all my knowledge is through the random hodgepodge of trivia from SignHillHiker (if it wasn't for him I wouldn't even know what a signal hill is or that you could hike it).

My guess is that unless one has traveled there or have some reason for thinking about it then you won't really have much knowledge about Newfoundland or any other small place in Canada. Newfoundland is an outlier because most Canadians have never been there, the least traveled to Province in Canada.

I'd bet most people from the Maritimes have about as much knowledge of cities like Kelowna and Lethbridge as people from The Prairies know about similar sized cities in the East like the two St.Johns's. (or even that there are two St.Johns for that matter)
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 1:45 PM
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I'd bet most people from the Maritimes have about as much knowledge of cities like Kelowna and Lethbridge as people from The Prairies know about similar sized cities in the East like the two St.Johns's. (or even that there are two St.Johns for that matter)
St. John's and Saint John. Also, I'd suggest that the Johns are more noteworthy than Kelowna or Lethbridge--same size range, but far more historically important and central to Canadian history, and still principal centres for the region. One is a provincial capital, after all.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 1:48 PM
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St. John's and Saint John. Also, I'd suggest that the Johns are more noteworthy than Kelowna or Lethbridge--same size range, but far more historically important and central to Canadian history, and still principal centres for the region. One is a provincial capital, after all.
Absolutely! To equate st. John's and Lethbridge is ridiculous! Now Saint John? Sure.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 2:07 PM
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^ People in India and China know Mississauga and Richmond better. More people live there than in Boston, Portugal, and Ireland. Those are the places with strong connections. I had a taxi driver here ask me "where is this New place you came from? Is it in Canada?"
I really doubt anyone in the world being more familiar with Mississauga or whatever Richmond is (lol)

We are comparing a Canadian Province to a Canadian City. A Canadian City that IMO doesn't necessarily have a worldly identity.... if you called Mississauga Toronto, I would agree that it is better know FOR SURE around the world. I think most people think Mississauga is just a part of Toronto tbh.

When people read about Canada, or study about Canada - they would probably at least read up on what the names of the provinces are, etc. They would likely not be familiar with Mississauga or Richmond.

Not that I really care anyway, just my opinion.

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Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 2:57 PM
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I didn't meet anyone from Newfoundland until I moved to Ontario. Growing up in the Prairies they were just never around out parts, this has changed with the old oil boom that brought lots over our way, but I left right in the middle of that boom.
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