HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 6:34 PM
J.OT13's Avatar
J.OT13 J.OT13 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 6,263
How Much Has Your Downtown Shifted Historically?

I think a lot about how Montreal's Downtown shifted from Old Montreal and St. James Street to North-West around St. Catherine and Gare Centrale when Place Ville-Marie was built over the train tracks and has now expanded further west around Centre Bell.

Ottawa has seen such a shift as well, from the Byward Market, and then across the canal closer to Parliament, centered around Sparks. In the late 60s, it shifted west when Place de Ville was built and soon, LeBreton Flats will see towers rising around a future arena (hopefully).

How has your city's downtown shifted over the years?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 6:37 PM
Pinion Pinion is offline
See ya down under, mates
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,168
Vancouver has moved a few blocks west, after it moved 500km north in the 1800s (Oregon Treaty).

It's starting to feel like Burnaby will be the future downtown 100 years from now though, if trends continue.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 6:39 PM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,219
winnipegs started over by where the old fort garry gate is and and migrated towards the 2 trails of portage and main as the railways came through it pushed it more to meet inbetween with industry mixed into it resulting in what we know as the exchange today our city has definatly evolved over the last 150ish yrs
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 7:23 PM
Innsertnamehere's Avatar
Innsertnamehere Innsertnamehere is online now
Insertoronto
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,275
Toronto's as originally around King and Princess in the east end of downtown, butnover time shifted west. In the early 1900's King and Yonge was the most important intersection downtown, this shifted to King and Bay with the construction of the big bank buildings.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 7:24 PM
Boris2k7's Avatar
Boris2k7 Boris2k7 is offline
Majestic
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Calgary
Posts: 11,976
Calgary's downtown moved about 2 km northwest from Inglewood (then East Calgary), which was our de facto downtown from roughly 1875 to 1886, when a fire ravaged the community. This fire was the same one that made the city introduce ordinances which forced the use of our naturally abundant sandstone in big buildings. Settlement started east of the Elbow River because the land on the opposite site (including, of course, Fort Calgary), was originally reserved for the government. The coming of the railway changed all that.
__________________
"The only thing that gets me through our winters is the knowledge that they're the only thing keeping us free of giant ass spiders." -MonkeyRonin

Flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 8:02 PM
craneSpotter craneSpotter is offline
is watching.
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Victoria!
Posts: 2,427
Victoria's 'downtown' has not shifted at all - AFAIK.

The original Fort Victoria location is where Bastion Square is now located - which is considered the 'heart' of downtown (and OldTown). The downtown was actually quite substantial by 1862, the year the City of Victoria was incorporated.
__________________
"The reason this country continues its drift toward socialism and big nanny government is because too many people vote in the expectation of getting something for nothing, not because they have a concern for what is good for the country."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 8:04 PM
Coldrsx's Avatar
Coldrsx Coldrsx is offline
Community Guy
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 50,608
Edmonton is about the same give or take since 101st/Jasper was more or less always the centre of the modern city.
__________________
"The destructive effects of automobiles are much less a cause than a symptom of our incompetence at city building" - Jane Jacobs 1961ish

Wake me up when I can see skyscrapers
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 8:12 PM
Andy6's Avatar
Andy6 Andy6 is online now
Starring as himself
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Toronto Yorkville
Posts: 7,644
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ajs View Post
winnipegs started over by where the old fort garry gate is and and migrated towards the 2 trails of portage and main as the railways came through it pushed it more to meet inbetween with industry mixed into it resulting in what we know as the exchange today our city has definatly evolved over the last 150ish yrs
Yes, Winnipeg’s began to shift westward from Main Street (from Portage to Higgins) in 1905 when Eaton’s chose Portage and Donald as the site for its store.
__________________
crispy crunchy light and snappy
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 8:19 PM
esquire's Avatar
esquire esquire is online now
Think about Winnipeg.
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,157
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ajs View Post
winnipegs started over by where the old fort garry gate is and and migrated towards the 2 trails of portage and main as the railways came through it pushed it more to meet inbetween with industry mixed into it resulting in what we know as the exchange today our city has definatly evolved over the last 150ish yrs
I always thought of Winnipeg as having two downtowns... there is the old original downtown consisting of Portage and Main at the south end, the CP station at the north and the stretch of north Main (around City Hall) being at the core of it.

Then over the years the old Hudson's Bay Reserve SW of P&M really became the heart of downtown. That was especially the case once Eaton's and then later The Bay and a bunch of other retailers set up shop around there.

Here's a map of downtown... the red circle is a rough estimation of 'old downtown' while the green circle represents the new.

When you go to the 'old downtown' there is very little new commercial development. Anything built in the last 75 years is mostly publicly funded with the exception of the Portage and Main skyscrapers, although there are a lot of commercial functions occupying those older buildings.

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 11:31 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 25,196
Not at all. Water Street bills itself as the oldest street in North America, which is surprisingly a slightly more credible claim than our general oldest city in North America one.

It used to be known as Lower Path, and Duckworth Street as Upper Path. The eastern sections of both were straightened at some point, I believe after the Great Fire of 1892. But otherwise it's pretty much as it's been.
__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 12:32 AM
ScreamingViking's Avatar
ScreamingViking ScreamingViking is offline
Species: Homo Hamiltonus
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Burlington
Posts: 2,275
Hamilton's has remained centred on the King/James intersection and Gore Park. The borders of "downtown" may have fluctuated, but the core is basically the same place its been since the city was incorporated in 1846 (and before that).
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 4:40 AM
Loco101's Avatar
Loco101 Loco101 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Timmins, Northern Ontario
Posts: 2,338
Downtown Timmins has shifted a bit to the East by a block or so. hehe
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 2:43 PM
lio45 lio45 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Lévis, QC
Posts: 18,317
I would tend to say the downtown hasn't moved, but by the OP's standards (distinguishing Old Montreal, which never moved, and the current location of the CBD) I would say the current CBD is at the bridges, 10 km west of Old Quebec.

No one would ever speak in terms implying the old town core isn't the "downtown", but in terms of function, the location where the tallest towers are and biggest business is done is now 10 km away from where it used to be at the beginning of the city, if that's the question.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 2:46 PM
lio45 lio45 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Lévis, QC
Posts: 18,317
Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
Not at all. Water Street bills itself as the oldest street in North America, which is surprisingly a slightly more credible claim than our general oldest city in North America one.

It used to be known as Lower Path, and Duckworth Street as Upper Path. The eastern sections of both were straightened at some point, I believe after the Great Fire of 1892. But otherwise it's pretty much as it's been.
If there was a La Défense style cluster of newer glass towers somewhere beyond Empire Ave, you guys would still call downtown St. John's downtown St. John's, right? I think I know what the point of this thread is but I would have asked the question somewhat differently
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 4:05 PM
GernB GernB is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Lethbridge AB
Posts: 809
Lethbridge's downtown started out near the crest of the coulees, gradually moving eastward through the 20th century as the original downtown decayed. This movement was arrested and reversed somewhat with the opening of Lethbridge Centre and the provincial courthouse in the mid 70s, but was slowed by the coming of Park Place in the mid 80s. This older section of the downtown has only recently fully recovered from that godawful mistake, and the downtown now covers an area from the coulee crest to Stafford Drive, and from 1st Avenue S. to 6th Avenue S.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 5:51 PM
KnoxfordGuy's Avatar
KnoxfordGuy KnoxfordGuy is offline
New Brunswick booster!
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Fredericton, New Brunswick
Posts: 1,064
Fredericton has been the same since 1784 lol. But that's to be expected in a small city.
__________________
Fredericton. Noble Daughter Of The Forest.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 6:08 PM
matt602's Avatar
matt602 matt602 is offline
Hammer'd
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: St. Catharines/Hamilton, ON
Posts: 4,330
Hamilton's core has pretty much always been centered on King and James (the Gore district) and remains that way today. Toronto's I feel has kinda shifted Northwest from it's original location. Toronto, being a gigantic city, also has tons of uptowns and mini-downtowns so it can be a lot harder to define.
__________________
"Above all, Hamilton must learn to think like a city, not a suburban hybrid where residents drive everywhere. What makes Hamilton interesting is the fact it's a city. The sprawl that surrounds it, which can be found all over North America, is running out of time."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 6:33 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is online now
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 19,144
Halifax's downtown has always been drifting uphill and south, and changed suddenly in the 1960's and 70's due to urban renewal projects. As a result of this, different parts of downtown have architecture from distinct historical periods.

In the 1700's, commercial activity was concentrated around Lower Water Street. This was "downtown Halifax" circa 1750-1840:


Source


By the 1850's, the nicest retail area was along Granville Street, two blocks farther up. These buildings are from that era:


Source


Then from around 1870-1900, the biggest retailers moved to Barrington Street, which ended up as a mix of mostly Victorian and early 20th century buildings:


Source



Source



Source


In 1960, Barrington was the busiest street and Gottingen was perhaps the second busiest area. By the 1990's, Spring Garden Road was the busiest retail area and Barrington was quite run down. Spring Garden Road evolved from a neighbourhood with a small main street in the 1970's into a state where it is just as built up as the older parts of downtown, but with a much higher population density. What happened to Barrington is similar to what happened to Yonge Street in Toronto, while the worst part of Gottingen reminds me of Hastings in Vancouver.

These days every part of inner city Halifax is gentrifying, and boundaries of the downtown area are getting fuzzier. I expect that some of the biggest developments will end up in outer areas of the urban core in the future because of height limits and limited available land in more central areas.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 7:00 PM
itom 987's Avatar
itom 987 itom 987 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 4,001
The Ice District is making Edmonton's downtown move north.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 9:11 PM
Andy6's Avatar
Andy6 Andy6 is online now
Starring as himself
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Toronto Yorkville
Posts: 7,644
Nice picture of an “Information Canada” bookstore in that last Halifax shot. That’s a real 1970s Trudeau-era throwback!
__________________
crispy crunchy light and snappy
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 8:26 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.