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Old Posted Dec 28, 2017, 2:46 AM
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Do things that make cities attractive to immigrants attract transplants & vice versa?

Some things would be attractive to both transplants from outside the city and newcomers to the country -- a good economy, low crime, good infrastructure, education etc. When cities boom, probably both immigrants and transplants seek to move there. When they do poorly economically, both groups would prefer to go elsewhere.

Other things may not be so equal between immigrants and transplants. For example, critical mass of previous immigrant settlement history or cultural amenities matter much more to new immigrants usually than internal migrants and transplants, unless they are specifically looking for this diversity or authenticity. In some cases, they might even be opposed in terms of what shops or businesses and amenities they want.

Transplants and immigrants might also differ in how much they're willing to deal with things like traffic, crowding and other nuisances of living in a city in terms of trade-offs with living close to the neighborhoods and amenities they want.
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Old Posted Dec 28, 2017, 5:46 AM
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I think most immigrants are attracted to cities that already have a large community of those that came from their home country. Most transplants are attracted to cities that have large communities of other transplants. There are mavericks in each group that set the standard and they usually go to a city they heard about and wanted to go to.

This is at least what I have observed.
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Old Posted Dec 28, 2017, 3:37 PM
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In the U.S., basically all immigrant hubs have net negative domestic migration. The same is generally true in the European immigrant hubs.

So I would say no, generally speaking. Immigrants put extra pressure on housing markets and tend to be extremely hard-working, which may incentive domestic moves to cheaper, less competitive markets.
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Old Posted Dec 28, 2017, 5:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
In the U.S., basically all immigrant hubs have net negative domestic migration. The same is generally true in the European immigrant hubs.

So I would say no, generally speaking. Immigrants put extra pressure on housing markets and tend to be extremely hard-working, which may incentive domestic moves to cheaper, less competitive markets.
I know NYC and California cities have negative domestic migration but I thought some European cities like London and Paris had both strong international as well as domestic migration due to them being the "primate city" of their country.
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Old Posted Dec 28, 2017, 5:59 PM
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I know NYC and California cities have negative domestic migration but I thought some European cities like London and Paris had both strong international as well as domestic migration due to them being the "primate city" of their country.
Both London and Paris have significant negative net domestic migration.

London has an annual net domestic loss of over 50,000 residents:
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...les/2015-06-30

I'm not sure if there's a first world immigration hub that also has positive domestic migration. That wouldn't make much sense. You would have to have crazy construction stats, and some weird scenario where people are fleeing from affordable housing to expensive housing in their senior years.
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Old Posted Dec 28, 2017, 6:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Both London and Paris have significant negative net domestic migration.

London has an annual net domestic loss of over 50,000 residents:
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...les/2015-06-30

I'm not sure if there's a first world immigration hub that also has positive domestic migration. That wouldn't make much sense. You would have to have crazy construction stats, and some weird scenario where people are fleeing from affordable housing to expensive housing in their senior years.
Unless there's a large pulse of young people undergoing a domestic migration that balances out the numbers of older people leaving to suburbs (or out of the metro area entirely).

But I don't know if such a scenario exists.
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Old Posted Dec 28, 2017, 6:10 PM
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Another thing I wonder about was how long the trend of immigrants and domestic migrants trending differently in their migration paths towards or away from cities existed.

During the eras of boom towns of generations past, was it also like this, or did immigrants and domestic migrants all seek out the same areas?

After all, the settlement of the western frontier attracted both immigrants and domestic migrants. The success of cities like Chicago involved both immigration and domestic migration.
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Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 12:46 AM
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Even though there is generally a domestic out-migration out of big cities and immigration in, there are still places in the US where immigration and domestic migration are both going in the same direction -- places like Atlanta, Houston and Dallas have both.

https://www.citylab.com/equity/2014/...s-cities/8873/
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