HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 3:36 AM
pip's Avatar
pip pip is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3,373
Why Koreans Shun the Suburbs

In cities around the world, harried urbanites look to the suburbs for more space or a nicer house for their money. But in South Korea, the city apartment is still the dream.

https://www.citylab.com/design/2017/...uburbs/539523/
__________________
Only 4 years to go.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 12:39 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Brooklyn, NYC/Polanco, DF
Posts: 15,989
Never been to South Korea, but the premise sounds implausible. Does Korea have North America-style suburbs within easy commuting distance? I doubt it.

When Koreans immigrate to U.S./Canada, they tend to live in SFH in suburbia. So it does not seem that they have an urban preference. It's more likely that they live in urban housing because that's the only practical option.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 2:45 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 1,379
Quote:
In contrast, detached houses are associated with substandard living, because few of them have been built since Korea’s economic miracle of the 1960s-1990s. Kim Kyung-hwan, a professor of economics at Sogang University in Seoul, remembers visiting the first apartment building in Seoul in 1962. He was a child, and his aunt lived there.
I happened to be in Korea last month, and this is the impression I got. The outskirt areas around Busan look almost like slums... They reminded me of the favelas surrounding Rio, albeit in much better living condition. By contrast, the centers of Busan and Seoul are all filled with modern apartment high-rises.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 3:13 PM
Sun Belt Sun Belt is offline
'Sunny'
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Sunshine and Shorts
Posts: 1,605
South Korea population: 51 million
Land area: 38,000 sq. miles

The land area of South Korea is about the size of Indiana or smaller than Kentucky.

There is not enough available land for them to build traditional suburbs like we can in the U.S. We have land, they do not.

Our most populated state, California (39 million) has a land area of 164,000 sq. miles.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 4:03 PM
destroycreate's Avatar
destroycreate destroycreate is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 1,241
Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
I happened to be in Korea last month, and this is the impression I got. The outskirt areas around Busan look almost like slums... They reminded me of the favelas surrounding Rio, albeit in much better living condition. By contrast, the centers of Busan and Seoul are all filled with modern apartment high-rises.
Slums? In Korea? Seems like like a stretch. Pics or didn't happen.
__________________
**16 years on SSP!**
Previously known as LaJollaCA

https://www.instagram.com/unlifestyled/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 4:25 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 1,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by destroycreate View Post
Slums? In Korea? Seems like like a stretch. Pics or didn't happen.


source: https://www.tripadvisor.co.za/Locati...age-Busan.html

Last edited by iheartthed; Jan 17, 2018 at 5:01 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 4:44 PM
MonkeyRonin's Avatar
MonkeyRonin MonkeyRonin is offline
¥ ¥ ¥
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 6,124
Quote:
Originally Posted by destroycreate View Post
Slums? In Korea? Seems like like a stretch. Pics or didn't happen.

They actually do still have a few shanty-type neighbourhoods! They appear to be holdouts from the post-war era that have resisted resettlement.



https://www.theguardian.com/cities/g...ds-in-pictures
__________________
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 5:29 PM
Capsicum's Avatar
Capsicum Capsicum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Western Hemisphere
Posts: 1,620
South Korea was pretty poor until fairly recently, wasn't it? It only became seen as a First World country within living memory of a generation or so.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 5:37 PM
Capsicum's Avatar
Capsicum Capsicum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Western Hemisphere
Posts: 1,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
When Koreans immigrate to U.S./Canada, they tend to live in SFH in suburbia. So it does not seem that they have an urban preference. It's more likely that they live in urban housing because that's the only practical option.
Do we expect immigrants to choose housing that reflects their previous society's urban nature, anyways? Especially since the immigrants leaving a place aren't representative of those who stayed.

Do we see examples of immigrants from crowded "old countries" preferring density in the new country, and those from spacious "old countries" preferring more space when they choose a living in the new country?

I doubt it. I don't imagine that immigrants from a highly crowded country like China or India, or a lower population density one like Russia or Bolivia, let these things shape their housing choices, once they've left their old place behind and now have to base their choices on the financial, social, and practical decisions they entail in the society they now reside in, not the one they used to.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 5:42 PM
The North One's Avatar
The North One The North One is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2,990
Quote:
Originally Posted by destroycreate View Post
Slums? In Korea? Seems like like a stretch. Pics or didn't happen.
What is it like living in such an oblivous bubble?
__________________
Spawn of questionable parentage!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2018, 5:43 PM
MolsonExport's Avatar
MolsonExport MolsonExport is offline
The Vomit Bag.
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: The Tropic of Sir Galahad
Posts: 31,374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Never been to South Korea, but the premise sounds implausible. Does Korea have North America-style suburbs within easy commuting distance? I doubt it.

When Koreans immigrate to U.S./Canada, they tend to live in SFH in suburbia. So it does not seem that they have an urban preference. It's more likely that they live in urban housing because that's the only practical option.
yes. my wife is Korean-Canadian, and I am therefore highly exposed to this community. All but a handful of recent arrivals live in the suburbs. One of the main drawing points for them is the ability to have a home and a piece of land....very important life goals and status symbols.

When I last visited Korea, there were a few shantytown holdouts, but far and away, most people lived in modern, albeit monotonous/sterile apartment blocks.

Seoul is more crowded than Tokyo. There are mountains everywhere in Korea, even in the heart of Seoul (Namsan).


koreadramaland

There is no room for SFH in the style of North America, for all but a few.
__________________
The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness. John Kenneth Galbraith
We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Sometimes we must interfere.Elie Wiesel
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 9:30 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.