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  #1  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 7:28 PM
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2017 city summary

Not everyone has the time to read through all the pages of development news in the city compilations forum or regional sub-forums. Summarize what happened in your city last year. Include noteworthy development news, political news, transit news, and any other significant news.

I'll start for DETROIT :

Little Caesars Arena opened and the Detroit Pistons began playing games in the city after playing in suburban Auburn Hills for the previous 3 decades. They joined the Detroit Red Wings in their new home.

The tallest skyscraper in the city was announced after state legislators passed a bill allowing developers to capture some tax revenue that would be generated by a so called "transformative project". The amount a developer could capture would depend on the population of the city the project was proposed for as well as the total cost of the project. The tower is currently proposed to reach a height of 800 ft.

Mayor Mike Duggan was re-elected to a second term. Mayor Duggan has made significant progress in improving the city's finances, services, and quality of life for residents.

Google, Microsoft, LinkedIn and Ford all announced they are opening offices or relocating their entire suburban offices to the city. Between the four companies, 610 new employees will be working in the city (depending on how many employees the LinkedIn office will have).

Violent crime continued to decrease and the 2017 homicide total reached a several decade low.

Transit took a small step forward when the Q line opened. This 3.3 mile streetcar line travels on Woodward Ave. from it's southern terminus at Congress St. downtown to Grand Blvd. at it's northern terminus in the New Center neighborhood.

Housing market heating up. The city recorded an impressive five sales of private homes of $1 million or higher. Noteworthy for a city famous for it's $500 or $1000 houses.

2017 was very good to a significant part of the city of Detroit. The oft mentioned renaissance finally seemed to emerge from obscurity and is undeniably transforming they city of Detroit.
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Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 10:36 PM
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Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 10:44 PM
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Chicago 2017: "A disaster, a total disaster"

as seen through the eyes of our nation's "president".
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Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 1:23 AM
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2017 saw the completion and start of many new skyscrapers in Toronto that brought the skyline that much closer to (hopefully) one day being mentioned in the same breath as the likes of such places as Jacksonville.
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Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 3:42 AM
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I just spotted this photo browsing the 30 Hudson thread and I think for NYC, 2017 can best be summarized by this shot. A booming metropolis seems like its u/c all at once.

(photo source):

2017

1) The unprecedented rise of so many super talls
2) Signifies the continuing boom
3) Alteration of the skyline
4) 1st new bridge built for the ny region in decades
5) The year of DeBlasio's affordable housing plan kicking into high gear
6) .... and much much more!

It was a very good year... like Sinatra would say.


Quote:
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Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 4:00 AM
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Flagstaff is on a never-ending quest to become "Northern Arizona University: The City" where we bend over backwards for Phoenecians who come up here to gawk at the snow they claimed to have been finished with once they moved from Chicago/Milwaukee/Minneapolis/Cleveland/Omaha and the California kids who couldn't get into any of the UCs or Cal States while basically telling actual residents (those of us who live/work here year round) to fuck off.

Phoenix discovered that homeless people like urban development just as much as the rest of us, but for different reasons.

Arizona's population has exceeded 7,000,000 for the first time in its history (that we know of...maybe the Hohokam and Anasazi had that many people and they just weren't as good at census estimates as we are nowadays )

Politically and fiscally, we are Kansas, but with better scenery.
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Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 3:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mind field View Post
Not everyone has the time to read through all the pages of development news in the city compilations forum or regional sub-forums. Summarize what happened in your city last year. Include noteworthy development news, political news, transit news, and any other significant news.

I'll start for DETROIT :

Little Caesars Arena opened and the Detroit Pistons began playing games in the city after playing in suburban Auburn Hills for the previous 3 decades. They joined the Detroit Red Wings in their new home.

The tallest skyscraper in the city was announced after state legislators passed a bill allowing developers to capture some tax revenue that would be generated by a so called "transformative project". The amount a developer could capture would depend on the population of the city the project was proposed for as well as the total cost of the project. The tower is currently proposed to reach a height of 800 ft.

Mayor Mike Duggan was re-elected to a second term. Mayor Duggan has made significant progress in improving the city's finances, services, and quality of life for residents.

Google, Microsoft, LinkedIn and Ford all announced they are opening offices or relocating their entire suburban offices to the city. Between the four companies, 610 new employees will be working in the city (depending on how many employees the LinkedIn office will have).

Violent crime continued to decrease and the 2017 homicide total reached a several decade low.

Transit took a small step forward when the Q line opened. This 3.3 mile streetcar line travels on Woodward Ave. from it's southern terminus at Congress St. downtown to Grand Blvd. at it's northern terminus in the New Center neighborhood.

Housing market heating up. The city recorded an impressive five sales of private homes of $1 million or higher. Noteworthy for a city famous for it's $500 or $1000 houses.

2017 was very good to a significant part of the city of Detroit. The oft mentioned renaissance finally seemed to emerge from obscurity and is undeniably transforming they city of Detroit.
I read yesterday that Detroit's population may finally be growing again.

Quote:
Census figures have yet to bear this out, but it certainly appears that Detroit's decades-long population slide is coming to an end. Mayor Duggan likes to cite data from DTE Energy on new residential service installations suggesting that Detroit's population may already be growing.

Whether the growth happens in 2018 or not for another year or two or three, any growth in that population number will signal a positive change for Detroit. It will reinforce the narrative of Detroit as a comeback city, and it will give further impetus to rising property values in some parts of the city.

https://www.freep.com/story/money/bu...nt/1004714001/
But even if it is growing now the 2020 census will probably still show a decline since 2010.
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Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 3:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
I just spotted this photo browsing the 30 Hudson thread and I think for NYC, 2017 can best be summarized by this shot. A booming metropolis seems like its u/c all at once.

(photo source):

2017

1) The unprecedented rise of so many super talls
2) Signifies the continuing boom
3) Alteration of the skyline
4) 1st new bridge built for the ny region in decades
5) The year of DeBlasio's affordable housing plan kicking into high gear
6) .... and much much more!

It was a very good year... like Sinatra would say.




I used to work in the building on the left.
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Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 3:30 PM
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Ever since 2012, there has been a big transformation for many American cities.

The recession sucked, but after if ended, things started getting nice. In retrospect, it almost feels like having the recession was for the best. Cities have see massive growth and change. To name a few: Dallas, Houston, LA, SF, Seattle, D.C., Philly, NY/JC/Newark, Miami, Atlanta, Austin, and so on.

Lots going on, lots of permits, acquisition of parcels for assemblages, light-rail and passenger rail improvement in a select-few places. Big moves for certain companies (tenants). The U.S. has seen a dramatic surge in its 300m+ stock both present and planned/u-c.

2017 was just leaping off the success of 2014-2016. Activity is still going strong, although slowing a tad bit, but its still positive news. These last 5 years have been a skyscraper and high rise revolution for many cities, especially in the 100-200m range.

In general, the population growth of cores is the step in the right direction.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
I used to work in the building on the left.
O man, you would of had the best view of HY. Do you still work in Midtown?
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  #10  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 4:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
O man, you would of had the best view of HY. Do you still work in Midtown?
It was very easy to see from my floor in the Allianz building. I still work in that area but a couple of avenues east, so my view is largely blocked. I have a great view of the Allianz building though, lol.
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  #11  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 5:47 PM
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Let's see, Montreal (from what I can think of now)

1. 375th birthday, year-long events (some amazing ones, some amazing flops as well)
2. completion of many buildings, further densifying downtown and the announcements of second, third phases.
3. Montreal establishes itself as an AI/Tech world leader, with FB, Google, Thales, DeepMind, etc... investing in the city with labs
4. Elected first female mayor in city history, MTL becomes the largest city in N.A with a female mayor.
5. Homicides down to 22 (24 with 2 open case files from 2016) lowest in history.
6. REM light rail (67km) approved by the government of Quebec, will start construction this year.
7. YUL hit 18 million passengers, nearly 3 years earlier than expected.
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  #12  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 7:18 PM
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A year ago, Downtown Seattle's boom was like any 2 or 3 past booms put together. Amazingly it's continued with similar strength since then.

This has three-year animations from the Space Needle Panocam's panos taken every 10 minutes: https://youtu.be/-2MTiUGvqyE

The Panocam itself, including views of any pano from the past few years (foggy at the moment): https://spaceneedle.roundshot.com/
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Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 7:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays View Post
A year ago, Downtown Seattle's boom was like any 2 or 3 past booms put together. Amazingly it's continued with similar strength since then.

This has three-year animations from the Space Needle Panocam's panos taken every 10 minutes: https://youtu.be/-2MTiUGvqyE
If there was ever a time for a like button, this is it.

Excellent video comparison. These are great. Always a fan of before and after pics with the same angle showing different years displaying the change, but when its in video format, its bar to none. Its like SC4 with cheetah speed on.

Are there any more resources or channels showcasing other cities that you know of? These are difficult to find at times, even pics.
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Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 4:18 PM
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nice to have some good news on detroit
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  #15  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 4:18 PM
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portland appears to be having a little boom of its own. apartment construction still seems to be going full tilt in every neighborhood in the inner quadrants and downtown construction is heating up. seems like were having a hotel boom also, with at least three or four new hotels finishing up or coming on line soon. lloyd district will be getting a new hotel at the convention center also, something that been rumored for at least a decade. housing supply is pretty tight also. i think we finished up the summer with about a two month supply. should continue to be a sellers market. on a recent bike ride i stopped at the top of the tillikum bridge and counted 12 construction cranes so things are moving along. rumor has it, some industrial se waterfront might also see some new development if omsi is able to move forward with their plans to develop some of their property. burnside bridge area is going crazy to. exciting times right now.
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Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 6:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays View Post
A year ago, Downtown Seattle's boom was like any 2 or 3 past booms put together. Amazingly it's continued with similar strength since then.

This has three-year animations from the Space Needle Panocam's panos taken every 10 minutes: https://youtu.be/-2MTiUGvqyE

The Panocam itself, including views of any pano from the past few years (foggy at the moment): https://spaceneedle.roundshot.com/
That time-lapse is amazing. Thanks for sharing.

Chicago: outside of the disasters Steely mentioned, a couple of things come to mind.

1) West Loop boom continued with more retail/restaurants, hotels, offices, and residential remaking the entire area.

The Parker apartments and five of the West Loop's tower cranes by YoChicago, on Flickr

2) Highrise canyon that sprouted up along Wells Street in River North was significantly completed.

2014: https://goo.gl/maps/ZvxCq534P372
2017: https://goo.gl/maps/MQv8KTath2z

3) A number of anticipated mega-developments were revealed thanks mainly to the Amazon HQ2 competition.

4) One Chicago Square supertall was proposed for a prominent block off of Michigan Avenue.
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Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 7:29 PM
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The NIMBYs of San Francisco don't seem as capable of preventing development when the city and developers focus on fairly small areas at a time. For the last decade we've been building out Rincon Hill and the adjacent TransBay Transit District.


https://www.google.com/search?q=Tran...w=1453&bih=713


https://www.google.com/search?q=Rinc...GC0OKkJE8unmM:

The ghost-like white and greenish massing images here show most of (but not all of) the projects in these areas (2 prominent ones missing are the 900 ft Ocanwide Center and the 750 ft TransBay Parcel F):


https://www.google.com/search?q=Rinc...JiRGEtQ4GuvuM:

Now, with these areas nearly built out in the current boom (Parcel F is the main remaining lot and its proposal is well all in review), the city is moving on to 2 new areas called "Central SOMA" and "The Hub".

The Hub


New Proposed height limits in The Hub are as shown here:


http://www.socketsite.com/archives/2...oot-tower.html

This is a view of what the "Hub" proposals will bring (again in ghostly white):


http://www.socketsite.com/archives/2...-proposed.html

Similarly, Central Soma is in the planning phase:


https://sf.curbed.com/2016/12/16/139...pact-report-sf

This area is less ambitious height-wise but proposals already contain some interesting buildings:




http://www.socketsite.com/archives/2...-proposed.html


http://www.socketsite.com/archives/2...o-in-2018.html
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Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 8:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
I read yesterday that Detroit's population may finally be growing again.



But even if it is growing now the 2020 census will probably still show a decline since 2010.
The metric that city officials like Duggan have been using to judge population growth in the city has been the number of new residential hookups va shut offs.
In 2016 it was thought bu Duggan at least that there might be an increase in the population due to the ever increasing number of hookups not just downtown but in the neighborhoods as well. the 2nd half of 2016 seems to have been the turning point where new hookups passes shut offs and 2017 the trend was only gaining strength.

There was a recent study done by Detroit Future City called 139 Square Miles & funded by the Knight Foundation that


Quote:
Local report details Detroit’s population trends, jobs, housing stock

By Robin Runyan
Curbed Detroit
Aug 23, 2017



Added the pic of S.W. cuz as the only consistently growing neighborhood for the past 20-25 years it seems appropriate.


A new report by Detroit Future City called 139 Square Miles, funded through the Knight Foundation, compiles a slew of Detroit data points to help understand where Detroit has been and where we might be headed. The report has data in four areas: population, economy, people, and place. This includes population trends in terms of age and race, where jobs are located and how much they pay, how people get to work, and how housing stock has changed.

Overall, the report shows that Detroit is finally moving toward growth for the first time in 60 years. Although the population itself hasn’t grown yet, it is stabilizing after decades of decline. In this graphic, we can see where housing and population is stabilizing in the city. The darker the blue, the greater the growth.





Although signs point toward growth, the number of families with children has declined significantly in Detroit; since 2000, the number has decreased by 43%.

The report also highlights how rent-burdened many residents are (as we’ve discussed before). While rents in Detroit are still less than other cities, the median income is also a lot lower. 58% of renters are cost-burdened, while 37% of renters spend more than 50% of their income on housing.

In terms of jobs, the report shows that Detroit has shown a large increase in jobs that pay more than $40,000 a year. Most are located in the downtown/Midtown corridor. The report shows a high number of residents who live in the city and commute out of the city for work (especially those with lower incomes). Unemployment is still high among African American and Hispanic residents, who make up a majority of the city’s population.

Detroit’s poverty rate sits at 40%.

The report also compiles data relating to safety, transportation (69% of commuters drive alone), schools, and health.
....

The full report can be found here -

https://detroitfuturecity.com/wp-con...ile_Report.pdf

https://detroit.curbed.com/2017/8/23...-report-trends



I believe the numbers used in the Future City report only go through 2015 things have really begun to heat up exponentially so I wouldn't be surprised to see the 60,000 new residents forecast by 2040 revised upwards.


Quote:
Study: Detroit will add 60,000 new residents by 2040

Louis Aguilar
The Detroit News
July 27, 2017


Detroit is expected to add 60,000 residents by 2040, the first time the city’s population will have shown growth since the 1950s, according a study to be released Thursday.

The forecast in a study by the Urban Institute also lists a predicted rise of senior-headed households for southeast Michigan and the continued challenges of homeownership, particular for African-Americans in the area.

The study, called Southeast Michigan Housing Futures, joins the growing number of reports predicting a stabilization of the region’s population and noting that Detroit will finally end its decades-long loss of residents.

“We’re seeing the point where (the population) is not going to get much lower,” said Mark Treskon, lead author of the study by the Washington, D.C.-based think tank.

....

The study reported that the region’s economy and population is expected to continue to recover from the deep pains experienced between 2000 to 2010.

Overall, the Metro Detroit region is expected to gain approximately 380,000 households by 2040, the study found. All counties are expected to gain population in the 2020s and 2030s, but the location of that growth is expected to shift. Macomb and Oakland counties, the usual growth areas in previous studies, will slow considerably, researchers said.

In 2016, the Detroit’s population slowed to its lowest pace in decades, according U.S. Census data. As of last summer, Detroit’s population was 672,795, a loss of 3,541 residents. The decline was nearly the same as 2015’s loss of 3,573 residents.

Between 2000 to 2010, the city was losing more than 23,700 per year on average, according to the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, based on census data.

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/new...wth/104031902/



I think the 3,000 new hookups came from DTE's March 2015 - 2016 numbers although it's possible 3,000 more hookups have occurred according to the 15-16 numbers. I'm inclined to believe that 2017 numbers aren't fully out yet though.

Quote:
To regrow, Detroit must aggressively confront its challenges

MARK S. LEE
Crain's Detroit Business
June 05, 2017

during his Mackinac conference comments, the mayor cited DTE Energy Co., which estimates there were more than 3,000 incremental housing electrical hookups in the last year — meaning more houses are becoming occupied and, hopefully, indicating population growth.

Additionally, many will point to the increase in housing and rental permits and population growth in Midtown and others will point to the number of businesses moving downtown, new development efforts and the increasingly strong entrepreneurial ecosystem across the city.

http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...its-challenges



*Edit I forgot to add in one more article in it's from a site called USPopulation2017.com which in its about section site aims to give most accurate population of USA states and its city in 2017. I didn't look too deep into the site while attempting to find the criteria they use so take these numbers with a grain of salt.

Quote:
Population of Detroit 2017

January 23, 2017
US Population 2017
Archive, City


2012 –698,582
2013 –688,701
2014 –678,588
2015 –677,416
2016 – 676,312


The population of Detroit in 2017 is forecasted to be 676,312 + 1108 = 677,420. So, the population of Detroit in the year 2017 as per estimated data = 677,420.

Detroit Population 2017 – 677,420 (estimated)
http://uspopulation2017.com/populati...roit-2017.html
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Last edited by Docta_Love; Jan 7, 2018 at 9:04 PM.
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  #19  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 9:16 PM
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YOUNGSTOWN:

(See full city compilation thread here)

- Downtown development continues to grow. Several new renovation projects in the neighborhood.
- The Wells Building, a historic mixed-use redevelopment project was completed.
- The Stambaugh Building, a historic skyscraper, began renovations to convert it into a DoubleTree by Hilton. The first floor will have 2 restaurants and will be completed in March.
- Construction has finally begun on our upcoming Riverfront Park - we are using old steel mill land in front of Downtown to build a huge park with a new amphitheater as its centerpiece.
- Development around the YSU campus continues - two new luxury apartment buildings completed, a new full size Barnes & Noble, and a mixed use development is under construction.
- The Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation (YNDC) cleaned up 367 properties, demolished 256 buildings, and fully renovated 43 houses - this has helped stabilize a few neighborhoods within the city.
- The Youngstown Business Incubator continues to grow its campus in Downtown, where it recently finished renovating a historic building for additive manufacturing use.
- Around 10 new restaurants have opened or announced they will open/relocate to Downtown. Downtown is becoming the area's main entertainment/nightlife center.

A rendering of our upcoming Riverfront Amphitheater Park in Downtown:


The Wells Building (apartments & offices) renovations:


One of the several new apartments popping up around the YSU campus:


Whistle & Keg Self-Serve Taproom: One of the many new bars/restaurants that opened in Downtown this year:
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Old Posted Jan 7, 2018, 10:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docta_Love View Post
Overall, the report shows that Detroit is finally moving toward growth for the first time in 60 years. Although the population itself hasn’t grown yet, it is stabilizing after decades of decline. In this graphic, we can see where housing and population is stabilizing in the city. The darker the blue, the greater the growth.
I have an unproven theory that Detroit may have temporarily stabilized during the 1990s, which if true means this isn't the first time in the past 60 years. But the rate of decline in the 1990s was the lowest it had been since 1950, and there could have easily been some years of growth in the early or mid-part of the decade that were eclipsed by an uptick in outward migration on the fringes of the decade. I think the sub-prime boom and crisis is what fueled the dramatic uptick in people leaving during 2000-2010. The decline first due to people leaving for exurban communities, and then for people in debt walking away from their homes. This theory would also explain why Chicago and Detroit's black populations have declined in tandem.
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