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Old Posted Jun 23, 2019, 7:37 PM
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South Pasadena, California---The city I live in.

About 10 years ago, I did a photo thread on these forums of the town I live in, South Pasadena, California. The thread has since disappeared of course, and the photo links have undoubtedly been broken anyway. I realize that now, I've been living in South Pasadena for 21 years. Time flies. I feel like South Pasadena hasn't changed much, though in the 10 years since I last posted a South Pasadena photo thread, some long time businesses have closed (and replaced by others), some of the very old huge trees around town have fallen from windstorms and whatnot (and replaced by saplings), and a lot of homeowners have replaced their lawns with very nice native plants/Xeriscaping, which I think is very great for the native ecosystem, and saves water.

This week in my town, the jacaranda trees have been in full bloom, which really dazzled me as I was driving home from work. I decided to take pictures of the jacaranda trees in my immediate neighborhood, and then as I started walking on my block a bit, I decided that over the course of the week, I would start taking pictures of the town... so re-hash, South Pasadena!

South Pasadena is a separate city from Pasadena, which is much bigger; even many southern Californians think South Pasadena is just the southern part of Pasadena, but it isn't. South Pasadena was incorporated on March 2, 1888, and pretty much has the same boundaries today as it did when it first incorporated. As of the 2010 census, it has a population of 25,619. It is 3.44 square miles in area. It's now a suburb of Los Angeles, in fact it borders the City of LA on its western side. Downtown Los Angeles is about 7 miles southwest.

I took these photos between June 18 to June 22, 2019.

These are the jacaranda trees in my immediate neighborhood. My block is on the right, but the street that my actual apartment building is on doesn't have jacaranda trees, it has sycamores. As you can see, I live in a postwar-era apartment area, many of them built in the 1940s and 1950s.









I live by Garfield Park.



Garfield Park gets plenty of use.; though on this day, it looked like not too many people were using it.



Typical Craftsman house in South Pasadena. This is by Garfield Park.







Notice the citrus tree in the front yard. I've noticed many older homes from the early 20th century in SoCal have citrus trees in the front yard.



This building was built in 1904 and was originally a bank. It now contains a coffeehouse called Kaldi and a hair salon. It's also been used in many commercials and films, most recently in the movie "Ladybird."



The east side of the same building.



A nice shady street. Those are native California oaks. So yes, we do have shade trees native to southern California.



This house might seem familiar to people who've watched the original "Halloween" horror movie with Jamie Lee Curtis. This is the Michael Myers murder house used in the film. Since being used in the 1978 film, it's been moved across the street and now houses offices. "Halloween" was filmed extensively in South Pasadena.



Here's the public library. It stands on a block that was originally a park that contained an older Carnegie Library. This part of the building dates from the late 1920s or early 1930s.









The house Jamie Lee Curtis' character lived in in the original "Halloween" film.











An old huge Moreton Bay fig tree next to the library. Kids seem to like to play on and around its roots.



They're filming in town again. All those Star Waggons in the parking lot of the school district headquarters. Did you know that actor Lyle Waggoner created the company Star Waggons? Before I found that out, I always wondered why "Waggons" was spelled with a double "g".







The historic Mission West business district, South Pasadena's original commercial center.



Locals refer to this sculpture as the "Walking Man" statue, but it's an artwork called "Astride-Aside," created by artist Michael Stutz, who created similar scupltures in San Francisco and Berlin.



It's in a plaza adjacent to the South Pasadena Metro Gold Line station.



This simple redwood structure is the oldest commercial building in South Pasadena. It opened in 1887 as a grocery store. It also served as a ticket office, telegraph station, bicycle shop, chapel and foundry. The City now owns the building and is used as its historical museum.





This watering trough for horses dates from 1906.





This commercial building was built in 1906.



It's actually adjacent to 2 other old commercial structures and they all collectively now house a Mexican bakery, a boba shop, an antique store, a gym, a yoga studio, an Irish pub, a hair salon, and a pan-Latin restaurant and bar. Upstairs are apartments.



















I wonder how much this little number is going for.



















Solar panels have ruined the look of this Craftsman, I think.











I *STILL* wonder who lives in this big old mansion.



This coffeehouse used to be Buster's, when I first moved to South Pasadena 21 years ago. After decades in business, the owners decided to retire. Then it became Moo on Mission like 2 years ago or something; it didn't seem like a lot of people went here when it was known as Moo on Mission; plus, the owners of Moo have an original shop in Sierra Madre. Then they decided to close the South Pas location. It was closed for several months, and then a few months ago, it became a Jones Coffee Roasters. The owner of Jones lives in South Pasadena and grew up in the area, and has a few other Jones Coffee shops in the city of Pasadena.







Nicole's Gourmet Market & Cafe. A popular place to get French products and food. It's adjacent to...



... Bistro de la Gare, a very good French restaurant. Aptly named restaurant---it's adjacent to the South Pasadena Metro Rail Station.



The popular South Pasadena Farmers Market, held on Thursdays. In addition to all the usual stuff they sell at farmers markets like produce, baked goods and honey, they also sell pupusas, musubi, Peruvian food, Mexican food, ice cream...











Carmela Ice Cream Co. is pretty good. They also have a brick-and-mortar shop.





Plenty of people like to picnic at the farmers market.







Some political tabling at the farmers market. I would love to do a table for the Green Party some time.





This is the Lucretia Garfield house, as in First Lady Lucretia Garfield. After her husband, US President James A. Garfield was assassinated in 1881, she lived the rest of her life in this house in South Pasadena, designed by the renowned Greene & Greene architects, and built in 1904. It's still a private residence. According to zillow.com, it's currently worth 3.8 million dollars. A bargain for a house lived in by a former First Lady, I think.





This is the Torrance house (actually more like a mansion), as in Jared Sidney Torrance, the man who founded the City of Torrance in Los Angeles County. Ironically, but not surprisingly, he never lived in Torrance (Torrance was originally envisioned as an industrial city).



A house on the same block.



A huge mansion across the street from the Lucretia Garfield house.



A more modest Craftsman bungalow, in another part of town. I love the landscaping.





Kinda Plain Janes, huh? I'd still live in them, though. I'd redo the landscaping, though...



A view looking southwest from Raymond Hill.



On this block a few doors down from what is now a Comerica Bank is Gus's BBQ, a pretty good restaurant.



This has been a pharmacy and soda fountain since 1915. Let's go inside for a malt.





Some movies and TV shows have been filmed here.



I had already started working on my strawberry malt before I decided to take a picture of it.



Calvary Presbyterian Church, built in 1925. Gothic-style architecture is rare in southern California.





Holy Family Catholic Church, in a more typical, Spanish Baroque style you see in southern California. The parish was established in 1910, with the current church building being completed in 1928.





Some independent shops along Mission Street near Fair Oaks Avenue. This area has been used (and continues to be used) in many commercials. I saw one recently for America's Best Contacts & Eyeglasses. I'm like 'Why does that streetscape look familiar? Oh, that's in South Pas.'




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Old Posted Jun 23, 2019, 9:49 PM
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This is where I grew up and went to school K-12. You really captured the essence of the place, from the main commercial thoroughfares to the tree-canopied residential streets. You also got the farmers’ market, which is a clear indication that you’re a true South Pasadenan!
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Old Posted Jun 23, 2019, 10:18 PM
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What a great looking town. The LA area has so many gems like this.
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Old Posted Jun 23, 2019, 10:32 PM
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Very pretty, it looks very much like an upper middle class old Midwestern suburb (especially with that comerica branch).

How is all this plant life supported with LA's Mediterranean climate? I guess they have the money to irrigate it all considering it's a wealthy area.
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Old Posted Jun 23, 2019, 11:19 PM
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As far as single family homes are concerned, craftsman bungalows are my absolute favorite. Such a great collection in that area of Southeen california. Thanks for sharing! The jacaranda trees look great as well.
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2019, 3:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The North One View Post
Very pretty, it looks very much like an upper middle class old Midwestern suburb (especially with that comerica branch).

How is all this plant life supported with LA's Mediterranean climate? I guess they have the money to irrigate it all considering it's a wealthy area.
Remember, LA has many micro climates. South Pas is basically at the foothills of the Angeles national forest. It gets significantly more rain than downtown or the beach communities, even though it's just 7 miles from downtown. Downtown LA averages about 15 inches of rain per year while south Pasadena gets closer to 20

I love South Pasadena. It's gorgeous and quaint. Gus's bbq is one of my favorite restaurants, bar none. Great job with the tour.
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2019, 5:13 AM
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Such a beautiful city. I've only made it over there once since I moved to LA last fall, but the quaint architecture, walkability, and greenery everywhere make for a refreshing change of scenery. I would definitely live there if my job was closer to the area.
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2019, 12:47 PM
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The feeling I always get when looking at California Craftsman... Correct me if I'm wrong here, but the impression I get is that once upon a time -- about the time that all of these fine houses and civic buildings were going up -- California advertised itself as a paradise on earth, and actually halfway believed itself to be. The cynicism wasn't quite there yet, and the cliched narrative of California as a paradise corrupted had yet to be fully written and fleshed out. In about thirty years's time, by the time Manson rolled around, it would be considered hopelessly naive to even believe in a paradise, and cynicism was the word of the day.
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2019, 4:20 PM
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How is all this plant life supported with LA's Mediterranean climate? I guess they have the money to irrigate it all considering it's a wealthy area.
If it weren't for that climate, a lot of plants that give a hint a photo or video was taken in pasadena....or some part of the midwest or europe, or asia....wouldn't exist. I've seen images of areas in florida that I at first mistake for socal.

Never occurred to me that vegetation is similar to people. if certain trees & plants are outside when the temperatures are too extreme, they won't survive.
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2019, 4:32 PM
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In about thirty years's time, by the time Manson rolled around, it would be considered hopelessly naive to even believe in a paradise, and cynicism was the word of the day.
makes me think of this quote from a tale of two cities:

Quote:
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair…

it wasn't all that long ago when a person based in pasadena, such as sopas, had to go all the way to santa monica or westwood to find something less burban & more fulfilling in an urban sort of way. that was when dtla wasn't pulling its share of the weight for LA. but regrettably, in 2019, the homelessness & litter problems in area like dt are now the worst of times.
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2019, 8:50 PM
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Thanks for the comments!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
This is where I grew up and went to school K-12. You really captured the essence of the place, from the main commercial thoroughfares to the tree-canopied residential streets. You also got the farmers’ market, which is a clear indication that you’re a true South Pasadenan!
Thanks! Yes, after living here 21 years, I consider South Pasadena to be my adopted hometown.


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How is all this plant life supported with LA's Mediterranean climate? I guess they have the money to irrigate it all considering it's a wealthy area.
Well, like LosAngelesSportsFan said, South Pasadena actually has a wetter micro-climate. There are also a lot of natural underground streams in the area, in fact, reading up on the history of South Pasadena, there were many streams and arroyos that went through the community, but over time they were built upon and some were undergrounded. And it does indeed rain more and stronger here during the rainy season in comparison with the LA coastal areas and the LA basin, because we are closer to the San Gabriel Mountains. Also, notably, South Pasadena is on a slope, so, we don't really get flooded streets during heavy rains, unlike even neighboring cities like Alhambra or other cities in the very flats of the San Gabriel Valley. I work in Rosemead, and there's a street there that floods regularly when it rains. South Pasadena's altitude is also higher than even neighboring Alhambra, which sometimes gets flooded streets during heavy rain.

Like many areas of SoCal, people do water their lawns in South Pasadena, but like I mentioned in my OP, a lot of homeowners (and apartment owners too) have been switching over to drought-tolerant/native landscaping, which requires a lot less water and looks great and more natural to the area. Looking at my photos again, I actually like the Craftsman houses that DON'T have the lawns in front of them. Natural landscaping attracts the natural insect and bird species too, so it creates a natural ecosystem. And I haven't done the research, but I wanna say that native California oaks also don't need a lot of water---but I could be wrong. It could also be that the roots have hit an underground water source, like the natural underground streams.


Quote:
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it wasn't all that long ago when a person based in pasadena, such as sopas, had to go all the way to santa monica or westwood to find something less burban & more fulfilling in an urban sort of way. that was when dtla wasn't pulling its share of the weight for LA. but regrettably, in 2019, the homelessness & litter problems in area like dt are now the worst of times.
Actually, I beg to differ a bit; Old Town Pasadena has always offered something sort of on the "urban" side in the San Gabriel Valley, so after moving to South Pas, I didn't really need to go to Santa Monica or Westwood to experience the same sort of thing; I could just go into Old Town. Although now, Old Town Pasadena is a lot more "sanitized" than it was, and there are too many chain stores. Though even back in the late 90s, people were already mourning what Old Town was becoming, but even back then, it still had somewhat of an edge and was still a little funky. They used to have a coffeehouse and bookstore where they would have poetry readings; they used to have a huge antique store in that old big building that the Scientologists now occupy (I was so angry when they moved into that building... and they seem to have a tendency to suck the street life out of any building they go into), and in the basement of that building, they used to have a small community playhouse that I saw a few plays at.

I used to go to the westside when I was a teen and in my early 20s, but when I moved to South Pas back in 1998, that's when I started exploring the eastside more and more, and going to the westside less and less. The proximity to South Pas helps, of course... and in exploring the eastside more, I've come to the conclusion that the eastside is far more interesting with nicer old architecture, and more of a history, unlike the westside, which can be quite bland. I rarely go into the westside anymore, unless it's to go to the Hammer Museum or the Getty, or the Fowler at UCLA. And that's another thing; ever since the Festival of Books moved from UCLA to USC, that's yet even one less reason for me to go to the westside. And of course Pasadena has its own cultural things to do like the Norton Simon Museum and Pacific Asia Museum, as well as the Pasadena Playhouse and the Civic Auditorium (though for a while now I feel the Civic has had less and less things on offer).

And when I moved to South Pas, there also wasn't really a reason for me to go to the westside to see indie/foreign/arthouse movies, because Pasadena also had movie theaters that showed those kinds of movies. I used to go to the westside to see those kinds of movies, but when I moved to South Pas, I started going to the arthouse theaters in Pasadena. Before the Laemmle's Playouse 7 on Colorado next to Vroman's opened in 2001 or 2002, Laemmle had a number of old single-screen movie theaters throughout Pasadena. Then when they opened Laemmle's Playhouse, they closed those other older theaters. And several years ago now, they opened an Arclight in Pasadena, so there are even more options for arthouse films.

My experience is subjective of course, but I've always loved downtown LA, even back in the 80s when I was a teen. I remember one day my senior year in high school, my best friend and I ditched school (and our parents even knew about it hehe) and went shopping at the Cooper Building in the garment district. We had a lot of fun, even though it was in a gritty area. And then we learned about Santee Alley and explored that area. Broadway was always lively, just the demographics and businesses were different back then. But back then, most businesses did definitely close up shop after 6pm or whatever. I've been going to Little Tokyo since the 80s. That Japanese diner, Kouraku, has been there since at least the 80s, and they've been offering late-night dining since then. So if anything, my moving to South Pas made it even more convenient for me to go to downtown LA, and then of course since the Metro Gold Line opening, I've had yet another option to go downtown. And ever since moving to South Pas, it made it that much closer and convenient for me to go to the downtown Central Library, which I go to regularly.

So yeah, for the last 21 years, living in South Pas, I actually don't go all that often to the westside.
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2019, 10:14 PM
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Beautiful, thanks for sharing.

E] Is it me, or are the Jacarandas having an extending season of blooming due to the cool wet conditions this spring/summer?
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Old Posted Jun 24, 2019, 11:33 PM
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Those Craftsman houses are amazing.
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Old Posted Jun 25, 2019, 12:03 AM
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Although now, Old Town Pasadena is a lot more "sanitized" than it was, and there are too many chain stores. Though even back in the late 90s, people were already mourning what Old Town was becoming, but even back then, it still had somewhat of an edge and was still a little funky.

My experience is subjective of course, but I've always loved downtown LA, even back in the 80s when I was a teen.

I've been going to Little Tokyo since the 80s. That Japanese diner, Kouraku, has been there since at least the 80s, and they've been offering late-night dining since then.

You're a real trooper....you walk the walk, don't just talk the talk.

I remember when old town pasadena was experiencing a less graffitied version of what dt's broadway has been dealing with from starting around the early 1960s to, in some ways, even still today. that's sort of a great depression lasting decades. Look at the condition of classic old bldgs like the Merritt bldg at 8th & broadway.

But that you still stuck with the hood, through thick & thin, is quite an act of patience & loyalty.

same thing with little tokyo....I recall the years when things like the higgins bldg was an abandoned mess, st vibianas was the same way....mostly parking lots & struggling stores. Even the japanese village built in the 1970s came off like a struggling investment. Few ppl lived around there, not many more worked around there too. today? It's finally where it should have been yrs ago. Look at the new rising budokan gymnasium.

The adjoining arts district? I recall a famous artist saying yrs ago that LA made him think of a place that the train had started bypassing a long time ago. Areas like the arts dist...or what has actually long been known as gritty industrialized eastern dtla...made even ppl like that shake their head.

I think of out of towners like this one not too long ago....

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=6464
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Old Posted Jun 25, 2019, 6:28 AM
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Yes! Love the Jacarandas...I have been taking my own pics of them in Burbank/Glendale this past week. I do live here, but in general, not a big fan of the LA area for many reasons, but a lot of it is actually due to the climate stuff discussed here, cause I am a nerd! I am not really a fan of semi arid mediterranean landscapes...streets lined with large trees and neighborhoods with abundant trees in general are hard to come by in much of the LA area. I have to say, the areas around Pasadena right up to the foothills of the San Gabriels are probably my absolute favorite in the area! Like the poster mentioned...the micro climate allows for more trees, the terrain is pleasant, the architecture is beautiful, the neighborhoods established, and you can drive up to mount Wilson and it feels like you are in the rockies in just 20 mins. It is EXPENSIVE though, but in my opinion that area and the surrounding communities are some of the most pleasant in the region! It has a vibe that is rare for the area, and part of it is probably that it reminds me of home in Minneapolis with all the craftsman style architecture. Great pics! That is my long blabbering reply that doesn't really say much...it is just funny because I was taking similar pics and thinking about a lot of the things mentioned here recently.

Last edited by MNMike; Jun 25, 2019 at 6:39 AM.
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Old Posted Jun 25, 2019, 6:16 PM
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South Pas, and really most of the neighboring communities (Pasadena, El Sereno, San Marino) are really wonderful. Probably my favorite part of Greater LA. Thanks for sharing the pics!

I understand there are abundant micro climates around LA, and that this area probably gets more rain than Downtown LA. That said, the lushness shown here is largely due to irrigation, as basically all green spaces in Southern California are. It simply doesn't rain for like 7-8 months at a time in SoCal, and it really doesn't matter how much rain you get in the other 4-5 months- if there's no moisture for that long, plants will die. Now, some of the larger trees have roots deep enough to tap into the water table. But the grasses, flowers, bushes, other (non-xeriscape) plants are all dependent on irrigation. It's artificial, but quite nice!
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Old Posted Jun 25, 2019, 10:58 PM
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Very quaint and pleasant and it looks like the Brady Bunch neighborhood !
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Old Posted Jun 26, 2019, 12:56 AM
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it looks like the Brady Bunch neighborhood !
never watched that show but was curious enough to wonder what the reference was all about.

south pasadena is more early 1900s custom, woodland hills/san fernando valley is more mid century, 1960s tract...

good timing.....just recently.....


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Old Posted Jun 26, 2019, 1:42 AM
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Very nice little burb!!
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Old Posted Jun 26, 2019, 6:23 PM
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Beautiful photos.

Fun fact: The Step By Step house is among those South Pasadena craftsmans. The show was supposed to be set in Wisconsin, but if you look carefully at the intro shots of the house you can clearly see palm trees in the background.
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