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  #961  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2006, 4:15 PM
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^ right back at ya dony.
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  #962  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2006, 10:55 PM
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" He Ate Life With a Shovel"--Brooke Palance Wilding.

Fitting send-off for Hazleton's own Jack Palance:

Family, friends say farewell
Monday, 18 December 2006
By JENNY PASCHALL
Special to the Standard-Speaker
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. – For a kid from the coal mines of Pennsylvania, it was quite a send off. On an unusually cold and rainy afternoon in Beverly Hills, about 350 people gathered at All Saints Episcopal Church to say a final farewell to Jack Palance.

As the congregation filed in, Andrij Kytasty played traditional Ukrainian music. The Hollywood connection became apparent immediately when the Rev. Gabriel Ferrer began speaking. As he welcomed the guests, the resemblance to his father, actor Jose Ferrer, was obvious.
The first speaker was Palance’s daughter, Brooke Palance Wilding (daughter-in-law of Elizabeth Taylor), who remembered her magical childhood spent traveling in England, Italy and Germany.
She spoke fondly of her father, thanking him for introducing her to the world of theatre, ballet and literature.
“He ate life with a shovel,” she said. “My father was seemingly fearless. He wanted to experience everything and gave unconditional love.”
She ended touchingly by whispering, “Thank you Daddy for everything. We’ll draw strength from your passion for life.”
Wilding was followed by the Hon. Rudi Gresham, Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington. He explained that Palance was an extraordinary man who had been through some very tough times. Following his horrific injuries as a result of a flying accident in World War II, he was awarded a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart and as Palance himself would say, a new face. When President George W. Bush asked to meet him, Gresham said he didn’t know who was more excited, Palance or the president.
He concluded by showing a photo of Palance on one of his last visits to a veterans’ hospital.
The irrepressible 85-year-old actor was doing pushups to entertain and inspire his audience of severely injured veterans.
Mykola Tochystkyi, consul general of Ukraine, offered the condolences of the people of Ukraine and their premier,Victor Yushchenko.
Next to speak was Gunnar Keel, who was a close friend of Palance’s late son, Cody. Keel, son of actor Howard Keel, spoke touchingly of his loving relationship with the Palance clan. There was sad laughter when he remarked that for the first time, Cody arrived somewhere before his father, and doubtless was waiting to show him around.
Actor Stacy Keach remarked that Palance was the best bad guy in film history.
He described introducing himself to Palance while on location in Spain.
“As the conversation progressed, I became aware of Jack’s enormous intelligence. He was so culturally well-informed, and I’m certain that this was a side of Jack’s character that many people were blind to, primarily because of the roles he played in movies,” Keach siad.
“In spite of this, Jack’s performances as Jack the Ripper and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde remain in my memory as two of the greatest performances I’ve ever seen. They were classics in their own right.”
Keach was followed by fellow actor and family friend Edward James Olmos, who appeared in numerous movies and TV series, including “Miami Vice,” “Battlestar Galactica” and “The West Wing.”
He spoke of Palance’s deep love of the Mexican community and also remembered how much Jack valued silence. Describing one day sitting in his trailer he said, “He gave me the highest honor – I shared more silence with him than anyone else. I once sat there for eight hours. Finally he said, ‘I like the piano.’ I took a deep breath and said, ‘So do I.’
“Then we sat for another four hours. He loved me because of that!”
Olmos also paid a touching tribute to Elaine Palance by reading a moving poem Palance wrote in October 19999, declaring his deep love for her.
The somber mood was lifted when Palance’s grandchildren, Tarquin Wilding and Lilly Spottiswoode, came to the podium.
After Tarquin described his grandfather as “one of the most amazing men to have ever lived,” Lilly explained that they wanted to make their grandfather smile so they sang a hilarious duet of ‘The Bum Song,’” which was clearly a family favorite and consisted mainly of the line “Hallelujah, I’m a bum.”
They provided a poignant moment of real joy and laughter.
Then Palance’s co-star in “City Slickers,” Billy Crystal, paid his tribute.
He remembered the night Palance won a Golden Globe as best supporting actor for his role as Curly, but Crystal was not so lucky – he was passed over when the awards were announced.
Palance consoled him by saying, “They’re dopes,” he said. Crystal pointed out that Palance had won. “Well, not all of them are dopes,” he responded.
According to Crystal, “Jack was the last of a breed.”
Finally, Palance’s daughter, Holly, thanked everyone for their tributes, certain he would have been delighted and moved.
She imagined asking him if he liked it and his response would likely be, “No Holly, I didn’t like it – I loved it!”
She also acknowledged the tremendous devotion of Elaine Palance, whom she referred to as her father’s “spitfire partner in life and love who made all of his days red-letter days.”
She ended by saying “Thank you, Daddy for teaching me to treat coal miners and kings the same.”
Long-time family friend and soloist Marsha Graham then sang a heartfelt rendition of “Amazing Grace.”
Residents of Hazleton were represented by Pasco Schiavo, Kevin Salaway and John Madden.
The crowd then left for a cocktail reception at Trader Vic’s, Palance’s favorite restaurant.



London-born writer Jenny Paschall and her partner, Drums native Ron Lyon, worked on several projects with a Palance connection, including 2003’s “Would You Believe It,” a Discovery Channel show based on “Ripley’s Believe It or Not.” Lyon produced that program, which was hosted by Palance.
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  #963  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2006, 1:34 PM
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Possible office park for Downton Scranton on former coal colliery site:


12/19/2006
$1M granted for city office park
BY DAVID FALCHEK
STAFF WRITER


Feds helping turn ‘sow’s ear into silk purse’ in West Side

A bid to bring white-collar jobs to a former colliery site received a million-dollar boost from the federal government Monday.

The Economic Development Administration contributed $1 million for the Mount Pleasant Corporate Center, a Scranton Lackawanna Industrial Building Co. project that calls for a 23-acre office park near downtown Scranton.

“This mine wasteland is at the entrance of our city,” said Austin Burke, president of the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce. “We are going to turn this sow’s ear into a silk purse.”

The office park will be situated between Linden Street and the McDade Expressway. Developers envision up to three glass and concrete office buildings rising from the current slag heaps. The park could accommodate about 1,000 employees.

However, the site will be expensive to develop — more than $4.5 million to clear and level, build roads and extend utilities. A sizable chunk of that is $1.1 million to widen and improve West Linden Street and Providence Road, said chamber vice president Andrew Skrip.

Keystone Block & Supply Co., currently at the site, will move after selling the property to SLIBCO, which expects to begin work in March.

Once the sites are ready, lots will be sold to private developers or companies who want to build on them. The majority of the site is in a Keystone Opportunity Zone, which extends several state and local tax exemptions to the developers through 2010.

The transformation of the former Mount Pleasant and Diamond Coal breaker site is as symbolic as it is economic, another step toward distancing the region from its anthracite past and moving toward a white-collar, technology economy.

“Companies always ask where they can go, and this will give us a place to put them,” Mayor Chris Doherty said. “Once we have it, we can go out and sell it.”

SLIBCO, the Chamber’s development arm, already has some money in the bank. The state has contributed $2 million in grants and $2 million in low-interest loans.

U.S. Rep. Paul Kanjorski, D-Nanticoke, was on hand for Monday’s grant announcement.

“You put your money on the winner,” he said. “In my district, no one’s been winning as much as Scranton has.”

EDA has contributed to city projects in the past, including the Scranton Enterprise Center and the renovation of the former Globe Store.

Contact the writer: dfalchek@timesshamrock.com
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  #964  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2006, 1:49 PM
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Sounds like a good project (providing the sites are filled with reliable companies which pay a living wage), but I wonder about any environmental issues. I know a couple of old industrial sites in ithaca are still up in the air development-wise because of hazardous material. Who pays for the clean-up, which can get mighty costly.
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  #965  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2006, 3:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ex-Ithacan View Post
Sounds like a good project (providing the sites are filled with reliable companies which pay a living wage), but I wonder about any environmental issues. I know a couple of old industrial sites in ithaca are still up in the air development-wise because of hazardous material. Who pays for the clean-up, which can get mighty costly.
As you know, so much of NePA is dotted with the toxic legacy of the anthracite boom times that it's anyone's guess what is clean, what is not, what can be cleaned and what cannot; yet, the river no longer turns bright orange in the summer from acid mine runoff/ oxidation as it did a generation ago...so there's always hope.

Another matter is the probablity that some of the 'dirty' facts will be obscured in order to lessen the clean-uo expense to business and/or state & municipalites; a great deal of local befouled sites have been reclaimed thru an outfit called the Earth Conservancy..and successfully marketed for new usages....yet some claim that these sites are not without fester in spots....

It is difficult stuff...repairing the damage of the past....that much can be said.
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  #966  
Old Posted Dec 20, 2006, 4:06 PM
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^ So true. I guess we're paying for out fathers' and grand fathers' sins so to speak. At least we don't have to worry about black lung as they did.
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  #967  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2006, 1:49 PM
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Wilkes-Barre: 80 more condos?...and a Museum......and a cultural center, lacrosse field, etc. at Kirby Park!

This time in Kingston on the riverfront directly opposite Central City Wilkes-Barre. These units would have wonderful views of the river and skyline.....

12/20/2006
Study: Condos will help pay for proposed museum
BY MICHAEL P. BUFFER
STAFF WRITER


WILKES-BARRE — Eighty new condos along the Susquehanna River levee in Kingston could help pay for an $8 million proposal to build an Iroqouis Confederation museum, according to study findings presented Tuesday to Luzerne County officials.

Wilkes University rowing coach Gerald Reisinger formed the nonprofit group “Southern Door” to collect private donations for the proposed Indian museum and lacrosse field on 4.7 acres by the Market Street Bridge. The county paid the architectural firm Bohlin Cywinski Jackson to conduct a $60,000 feasibility study of the proposal, county spokeswoman Kathy Bozinski said.

Jim Bell of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson reviewed the study Tuesday with members of the county Flood Protection Authority. The study recommends demolishing a 43,000-square-foot building, which was once site of the former Reilly Classic Motorcars Museum.

A museum and restaurant would consist of 20,000 square feet. The cultural center would be at the foot of the Market Street Bridge.

A lacrosse field would be at the foot of the levee, in front of the museum. Spectator seating would be accommodated on the foot of the levee.

Building and running the museum could be subsidized by selling 80 condos or renting 80 apartments along the levee, from the museum to Davis Street.

County Commissioner Stephen A. Urban said the county is trying to get grants for the proposal. Charles Reilly owns the land, Urban said.

mbuffer@citizensvoice.com

Last edited by donybrx; Dec 21, 2006 at 2:12 PM.
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  #968  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2006, 2:00 PM
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Pa. will get U.S. funds to clean up old mines

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ex-Ithacan View Post
Sounds like a good project (providing the sites are filled with reliable companies which pay a living wage), but I wonder about any environmental issues. I know a couple of old industrial sites in ithaca are still up in the air development-wise because of hazardous material. Who pays for the clean-up, which can get mighty costly.
Pa. will get U.S. funds to clean up old mines

By Kimberly Hefling
Associated Press
December 21, 2006

WASHINGTON - President Bush signed legislation yesterday that gives billions of dollars to coal-producing states like Pennsylvania to clean up hazardous abandoned mines and pay for retired miners' health care.

Pennsylvania stands to get nearly $1.4 billion over 18 years.

Bush's signature ends a long fight that has pitted coal-producing states against each other over the best use of funds collected for the nation's coal mine reclamation program.

Coal-producing states will receive an estimated $6.3 billion for abandoned mine cleanup and another $1.6 billion to pay for health care for retired miners who worked for coal companies that no longer exist, according to the federal Office of Surface Mining. The money will be distributed from 2007 to 2025.

The legislation, part of a sweeping tax bill, renews the abandoned mines land reclamation program created in 1977.

Particularly in eastern coalfields, toxins from abandoned mines pollute streams. Unstable land from abandoned mines has been blamed for fatal accidents by ATV riders and hikers - 24 Pennsylvania deaths were reported last year on abandoned mine land. Mines can catch fire and burn for years.

The program is based on a mandatory per-ton fee that coal companies pay into a fund.

Since the program's creation, much of the nation's mining has shifted from states in the east to those in the west.

The legislation signed yesterday lowers the fees paid into the program and modifies the formula so that historic coal mining states with the more serious problems get more funds.
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  #969  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2006, 2:19 PM
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^^^^^ Never enough and none to soon, eh?

Perhaps good timing should it affect the office park plan for DT Scranton three posts back up there ^^^^..........
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  #970  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2006, 10:11 PM
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the train...the train

What's up with the Scanton - NYC train?

I was on the phone with a Scranton realtor this morning and asked her whether there was speculation underway downtown as a result of the med school. She said, "not yet, but there's a lot of speculation because of the train." She said that folks from NY and NJ are using equity in their homes there to buy up properties in Scranton, usually two, one for appreciation and the other to move into when the train is online. She moved on to another matter and I neglected to ask her when the train was expected to be in operation.

Anyone know?
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  #971  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2006, 10:40 PM
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I dunno for sure, but I'd put my dollars on the med school well before train service......surely some of you folks in Scranton have some real insights? From what I hear, there are still complicted negotiations to be satisfied among PA, NJ state & local authorities regarding rights-of-way in particular. But I am no authority, rest assured, in this matter.............jeez, real estate speculaion in Scranton based on train transit...never thought I'd see those words in writing......
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  #972  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2006, 1:07 AM
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Murray Complex proposal in Wilkes-Barre. Condos/ retail getting possible leverage:

12/19/2006
Tax plan may boost city project
BY MICHAEL P. BUFFER
STAFF WRITER


WILKES-BARRE — A Tax Increment Financing plan would provide $2.2 million for a $20.7 million project to develop the former Murray Complex in the city, officials said Monday at the Luzerne County commissioners’ meeting.

The commissioners and the Wilkes-Barre Area School Board will vote Thursday on the TIF plan, officials said. The city also has to approve the plan in which the Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority borrows $2.2 million for improvements, such as resurfacing Ross Street and converting buildings into 55 condominiums.

The redevelopment project also would add 49,000 square feet in new commercial space. A fitness center and two or three new restaurants are planned on the 12.5-acre site owned by developer Daniel Siniawa Associates of Dickson City.

Under the TIF plan, tax money that comes from higher property values would pay off the $2.2 million loan. It would be in effect for 15 years beginning in August 2008.

The project is counting on another $2.6 million from the state to fund the project, according to TIF paperwork. The developer also expects to fund the project by selling 55 condo units for a total of $9.5 million.

County Commissioner Stephen Urban said he wants to learn more about the TIF plan, noting he already supported a county decision to provide a $1 million low-interest loan for the project.

“I don’t know how long we can continue to give away tax dollars,” Urban said.

Commissioner Todd Vonderheid, who didn’t attend Monday’s meeting, said the TIF plan isn’t costly because any increases in property tax revenue wouldn’t exist without the redevelopment project.

“The math is simple,” Vonderheid said. “We have a developer with great credentials who has already spent $1 million. He needs a little bit of help.”

The TIF plan would not prevent the city and school district from collecting revenue from other taxes, such as transfer taxes on real estate, the business privilege tax, the mercantile tax and the emergency service tax.

The county doesn’t get money from those taxes, Urban said.

The city is projected to get $1.4 million in revenue from the other taxes over 15 years, and the school district would get almost $400,000, according to a project analysis based on a series of assumptions.

mbuffer@citizensvoice.com
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  #973  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2006, 12:46 PM
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Seems like good news for W-B just keeps rolling in. I think the city (the NE PA in general) is on the cusp of a big time turn-around.

@ bucks native - thanks for the info on the old mines. As I said, good news for the whole NE PA area.
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  #974  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2006, 1:45 PM
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train

Found this, note date:

Efforts continue on NYC rail link
BY ROGER DUPUIS II
STAFF WRITER
08/20/2006

To the public eye, it may seem that progress on bringing passenger train service back to Scranton is just idling in the station.

Not so, says a local official working on the project.

“There’s been a lot going on behind the scenes, and it seems to be going well,” said Larry Malski, chief operating officer of the Pennsylvania Northeast Regional Railroad Authority.

Take, for example, Mr. Malski’s own organization. In May, the railroad authorities in Lackawanna and Monroe counties merged to form a new, regional agency that will oversee matters related to the Pennsylvania portion of the Scranton-Hoboken line.

“That’s been a plus to the feds,” Mr. Malski said Wednesday.

After all, the federal government is expected to pay about half the estimated $300 to $350 million capital cost, based on local estimates, with the states of Pennsylvania and New Jersey expected to split the rest. New Jersey Transit spokesman Joe Dee said Friday that the number could be as high as $550 million.

While no hard and fast date has been set, the most recent estimate for a completion date has been 2010 — at the earliest.

The biggest physical barrier is the so-called Lackawanna Cutoff, a 28-mile, rail-less right-of-way in New Jersey. The rail authority owns about 60 miles of track from Scranton to the Delaware Water Gap, where the tracks end. There begins the 28-mile gap to Port Morris, N.J., where New Jersey Transit’s 45-mile line from Hoboken ends. The total trip from Scranton to Hoboken would be 133 miles.

In the coming weeks, rail authority officials are expected to hold a conference call with NJT, operator of a sprawling, statewide rail and bus system which would be the likely operator of the Hoboken-Scranton service. Other participants could include PennDOT and representatives from Warren, Sussex and Morris counties in New Jersey.

Mr. Malski said the parley could bring progress on creation of a bi-state funding agreement for long-term operation of the service, another key step federal officials will want to see before giving the green light for funding to be released and work to begin. The rail authority also hopes NJT will take a closer look at high-speed rail technology for the line.

Mr. Dee said a draft environmental assessment for the project, submitted to the Federal Transit Administration on June 1, is under FTA review.

Closer to home, meanwhile, progress on creation of an intermodal bus and train station in Scranton also will give the line another gold star in the government’s book, officials say.

Contact the writer: rdupuis@timesshamrock.com

And this, at NJTransit website (note that Wilkes Barre is not on the line - bummer!):


Last edited by bucks native; Dec 22, 2006 at 1:46 PM. Reason: no image
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  #975  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2006, 4:18 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bucks native View Post
Found this, note date:

Efforts continue on NYC rail link
BY ROGER DUPUIS II
STAFF WRITER
08/20/2006

To the public eye, it may seem that progress on bringing passenger train service back to Scranton is just idling in the station.

Not so, says a local official working on the project.

“There’s been a lot going on behind the scenes, and it seems to be going well,” said Larry Malski, chief operating officer of the Pennsylvania Northeast Regional Railroad Authority.

Take, for example, Mr. Malski’s own organization. In May, the railroad authorities in Lackawanna and Monroe counties merged to form a new, regional agency that will oversee matters related to the Pennsylvania portion of the Scranton-Hoboken line.

“That’s been a plus to the feds,” Mr. Malski said Wednesday.

After all, the federal government is expected to pay about half the estimated $300 to $350 million capital cost, based on local estimates, with the states of Pennsylvania and New Jersey expected to split the rest. New Jersey Transit spokesman Joe Dee said Friday that the number could be as high as $550 million.

While no hard and fast date has been set, the most recent estimate for a completion date has been 2010 — at the earliest.

The biggest physical barrier is the so-called Lackawanna Cutoff, a 28-mile, rail-less right-of-way in New Jersey. The rail authority owns about 60 miles of track from Scranton to the Delaware Water Gap, where the tracks end. There begins the 28-mile gap to Port Morris, N.J., where New Jersey Transit’s 45-mile line from Hoboken ends. The total trip from Scranton to Hoboken would be 133 miles.

In the coming weeks, rail authority officials are expected to hold a conference call with NJT, operator of a sprawling, statewide rail and bus system which would be the likely operator of the Hoboken-Scranton service. Other participants could include PennDOT and representatives from Warren, Sussex and Morris counties in New Jersey.

Mr. Malski said the parley could bring progress on creation of a bi-state funding agreement for long-term operation of the service, another key step federal officials will want to see before giving the green light for funding to be released and work to begin. The rail authority also hopes NJT will take a closer look at high-speed rail technology for the line.

Mr. Dee said a draft environmental assessment for the project, submitted to the Federal Transit Administration on June 1, is under FTA review.



And this, at NJTransit website (note that Wilkes Barre is not on the line - bummer!):
Oh, Wilkes-Barre will include its bad self....the trackage is there, waiting for some revisions and upgrades and voila!.....there should also be included a trolley line for the Nanticoke- Wilkes-Barre- Pittston-Scranton corridor for sure!

I recall reading the Aug. article that you post above......it seems that the most rail activity has been in terms of freight as noted in a separate thread I started (here in NE section, somewhere below).

I wonder whether the momentum for freight rail shipping might not speed up the passenger end of the matter somehow....Why not? I ask you....
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  #976  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2006, 4:50 PM
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^ Everything old is new again. Good news, especially for train buffs.
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  #977  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2006, 6:13 PM
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Might I recommend doing a search on "lackawanna cut off forum" in google to get all types of info on the train.


No offense but realters have been hyping train service for years , so I have heard. This is not to say the train won't finally come sometime early in the next decade.


happy holidays!
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  #978  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2006, 9:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Snakeyes View Post
Might I recommend doing a search on "lackawanna cut off forum" in google to get all types of info on the train.


No offense but realters have been hyping train service for years , so I have heard. This is not to say the train won't finally come sometime early in the next decade.


happy holidays!
Realtors hyping? Do fish swim?

Seriously, trains will be back in some fashion but I think that even 2010 as stated in the newspaper account is wishful thinking. With the growth of businss in suburban New Jersey, there could be a new commutation pattern emerging...from north central Jersey to Pocono Mountains and Scranton.
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  #979  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2006, 2:11 AM
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It's official. Green light for Murray complex. Shovels to 'hit the ground' next spring.
Downtown blighted area to realize:

The Murray Complex Strategic Plan - Wilkes-Barre, PA - Program planning for a 16-acre, 13 building, 480,000 SF site - historic renovation and new construction
---55 condos
---retail
---dining
---entertainment........

(Wish we'd get some renderings of these projects!)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Posted on Fri, Dec. 22, 2006

W-B Area signs on to Murray Complex plan
Board OKs a tax increment financing plan for condos, shops and restaurants at site.

By JANINE UNGVARSKY Times Leader Correspondent

WILKES-BARRE – Voicing praise for the developers, the Wilkes-Barre Area School Board voted unanimously to approve the district’s participation in a tax increment financing plan to fund renovations to the Murray Complex.

Wilkes-Barre attorney Frank Hoegen, speaking for the Siniawa family – the Scranton-based developer of the $22 million project in the century-old warehouse space – said the condominiums, shops and restaurants would serve as a catalyst for further development.

“The Siniawas are going to borrow $15 million and pledge their properties as collateral. They are taking a huge personal risk to take a blighted area in downtown Wilkes-Barre and turn it into a showcase,” Hoegen said.

According to the resolution passed Thursday, the school district will join with Luzerne County and the city of Wilkes-Barre to develop a tax increment financing plan to fund $2.2 million of the debt for the project’s first phase. That phase calls for 55 condominium units and businesses that will generate an estimated $313,000 in taxes beyond the $20,000 the 480,000-square-foot site now nets the district.

“That increase will be created by virtue of the improvement to the property,” Hoegen said, “and the difference will be channeled to the (Luzerne County) Redevelopment Authority to pay the debt service on the loan.”

He said the district will continue to receive the $20,000 in taxes it currently receives, as well as mercantile, transfer and income taxes generated by the property. At the end of the 15-year term of the financing plan, the additional tax revenue will be split between the city, the county and the school district at a rate yet to be agreed upon, according to the resolution.

Luzerne County Commissioners approved participation in the plan earlier Thursday. Hoegen said the city is expected to decide soon whether to join in.

Project architect Alexander J. Belavitz said the plan is to “have the shovel in the ground” to start the project by late spring or early summer.

In other business, the board approved a bid for $76,000 from low bidder G.C. Wall to repair two crumbling chimneys at Meyers High School.

Last edited by donybrx; Dec 23, 2006 at 2:16 AM.
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Old Posted Dec 23, 2006, 12:36 PM
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bucks native bucks native is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: NEPA Valley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donybrx View Post
It's official. Green light for Murray complex. Shovels to 'hit the ground' next spring.
Downtown blighted area to realize:

The Murray Complex Strategic Plan - Wilkes-Barre, PA - Program planning for a 16-acre, 13 building, 480,000 SF site - historic renovation and new construction
---55 condos
---retail
---dining
---entertainment........

(Wish we'd get some renderings of these projects!)

Go here, look under projects: http://www.facilitydesignltd.com/
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