HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #281  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2006, 9:36 AM
<Dave>'s Avatar
<Dave> <Dave> is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 949
Quote:
The condos range from 950-square-foot one-bedroom units to 16,000-square-foot penthouses.
950 square feet is the minimum unit size? That sounds really big.
__________________
Review restaurants in Vancouver & Victoria - www.dinehere.ca
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #282  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2006, 1:10 PM
Hoodrat Hoodrat is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: >TACOMA<
Posts: 893
that 6th and wall rendering is sweet!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #283  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2006, 8:30 PM
James Bond Agent 007's Avatar
James Bond Agent 007 James Bond Agent 007 is offline
Posh
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Seattle-Upon-Rust
Posts: 16,810
I added the new rendering of 6th and Wall on the first post.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #284  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2006, 5:44 AM
mSeattle's Avatar
mSeattle mSeattle is offline
Socialism 4 Extreme Rich?
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: here
Posts: 9,002
Is 2000 3rd Ave already listed in this thread?


http://web1.seattle.gov/dpd/luib/Notice.aspx?id=3223
Land Use Application to allow a 42-story building containing 4,310 sq. ft. of retail and 500 residential units above. Parking for 402 vehicles to be provided above and below grade. Project includes 40,000 cu. yds. of grading. Addendum to EIS prepared by City of Seattle Downtown Height and Density Changes - January 2005.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #285  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2006, 5:56 AM
mSeattle's Avatar
mSeattle mSeattle is offline
Socialism 4 Extreme Rich?
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: here
Posts: 9,002
Is this one already known? 2301 6th Ave


http://web1.seattle.gov/dpd/luib/Notice.aspx?id=3016

Land Use Application to allow two, 32 story buildings (towers) over an eight story base structure. Project includes 640 residential units and 34,200 sq. ft. of retail space. Parking for 1,063 vehicles to be provided in an above and below-grade garage. Project also includes 76,000 cu. yds. of grading. Existing structure to be demolished. Addendum to existing environmental impact statements to be provided (2300 5th Avenue Development & Downtown Height and Density Changes).
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #286  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2006, 8:09 AM
seaskyfan seaskyfan is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,679
The 2000 3rd drawing on the first page of this thread is, I believe, for the old project that was approved on this site. I don't know if we've seen a rendering of the new 42 story proposal.

There was a thread about the 2301 6th on the Northwest Forum recently. It was in for Early Design Guidance and someone saw some renderings. Doesn't look like it's on the front page of this thread yet.

In other news, they've put up a fence around the Escala site at 4th & Stewart.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #287  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2006, 4:07 PM
Kenneth1000 Kenneth1000 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 15
Hi all. New member here.

I was wondering whether anyone knows what is going on with the project on the old Speakeasy building site on 2nd and Bell, I believe. They applied for a permit for an 8-story residential building, tore down the damaged building, and the site has been idle since, for more than 6 months. Any info would be appreciated.

Thanks.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #288  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2006, 8:26 PM
mSeattle's Avatar
mSeattle mSeattle is offline
Socialism 4 Extreme Rich?
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: here
Posts: 9,002
Quote:
Originally Posted by seaskyfan
The 2000 3rd drawing on the first page of this thread is, I believe, for the old project that was approved on this site. I don't know if we've seen a rendering of the new 42 story proposal.

In other news, they've put up a fence around the Escala site at 4th & Stewart.
What was the old project? That's good news on Escala.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #289  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2006, 8:28 PM
mSeattle's Avatar
mSeattle mSeattle is offline
Socialism 4 Extreme Rich?
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: here
Posts: 9,002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenneth1000
Hi all. New member here.

I was wondering whether anyone knows what is going on with the project on the old Speakeasy building site on 2nd and Bell, I believe. They applied for a permit for an 8-story residential building, tore down the damaged building, and the site has been idle since, for more than 6 months. Any info would be appreciated.

Thanks.
Good question. I think I went by there a couple of months ago and saw no signs, just a fence and grass.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #290  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2006, 3:08 AM
James Bond Agent 007's Avatar
James Bond Agent 007 James Bond Agent 007 is offline
Posh
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Seattle-Upon-Rust
Posts: 16,810
The Cosmopolitan has now topped off.

Just in case anyone wanted to know.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #291  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2006, 3:37 AM
mhays mhays is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,236
Quote:
Originally Posted by seaskyfan
The 2000 3rd drawing on the first page of this thread is, I believe, for the old project that was approved on this site. I don't know if we've seen a rendering of the new 42 story proposal.

There was a thread about the 2301 6th on the Northwest Forum recently. It was in for Early Design Guidance and someone saw some renderings. Doesn't look like it's on the front page of this thread yet.

In other news, they've put up a fence around the Escala site at 4th & Stewart.
How did I miss this thread?

We've been talking about the 42-story version of 2000 Third since it went in for design review in 2005. Though some of the compilation threads have kept using the old 2000(year) picture for some reason.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #292  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2006, 3:41 AM
mhays mhays is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenneth1000
Hi all. New member here.

I was wondering whether anyone knows what is going on with the project on the old Speakeasy building site on 2nd and Bell, I believe. They applied for a permit for an 8-story residential building, tore down the damaged building, and the site has been idle since, for more than 6 months. Any info would be appreciated.

Thanks.
I'd peg it at more than a year as a vacant lot. I have no idea what's happening, so I just peer that way every day when I walk up and down First.

Maybe they found out what construction projects cost these days. Maybe they wanted to redesign. Maybe they're timing the market -- if it's rentals, in 2005 they'd likely have thought it best to wait due to rents rising, though they wouldn't have banked on construction cost escalation.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #293  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2006, 3:42 AM
mhays mhays is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,236
Quote:
Originally Posted by mSeattle
What was the old project? That's good news on Escala.
The 2000(year) concept was a 20-story building with offices topped by a couple levels of housing.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #294  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2006, 3:45 AM
mhays mhays is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 13,236
Correction. The 2000 Third picture is still the six-year-old concept.

Every few months I say this. Who knows why.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #295  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2006, 3:15 PM
Vashon118 Vashon118 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Vashon, WA
Posts: 864
Looks like construction on Gallery Belltown could be starting soon. The site is fenced off and demolition work has begun on the building there.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #296  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2006, 3:26 AM
Lord Baphomet's Avatar
Lord Baphomet Lord Baphomet is offline
人至贱则无敌
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 6,813
For those who haven't seen this at SSC already, here's a DJC article on Olive 8:

NYC architect hired to give Olive 8 'landmark status'
By SAM BENNETT
Journal Staff Reporter


Photo by Sam Bennett
Architect Richard Gluckman said Olive 8 will have an animated facade. Egg-shaped cut-outs at the podium will let people see into the hotel. Richard Gluckman wants Olive 8 to fit in. But he's less concerned with how the building responds to nearby structures, and more interested in how it blends with the sky and topography.

“I'm not trying to blatently appropriate a regional style, if there is such a thing for high rise buildings,” he said. “I'm thinking about the way the building will look in different climactic conditions in Seattle — the gray and brilliant blue of the sky.”

Olive 8 began construction in January and is expected to be complete in the fall of 2008. Located at Eighth and Olive, it will include the 350-room Hyatt at Olive 8 hotel and 198 condos above. The 36-floor tower will have separate entrances for condo owners and hotel guests.

Even on gloomy days, Gluckman wants Olive 8 to have a glow, with its white and light gray exterior. He takes his cue from one other downtown building.

“I've always admired the Smith Tower as a really elegant building with unique proportions,” he said. “I think it's time we had another white tower.”

Developer R.C. Hedreen Co. hired Gluckman's firm, Gluckman Mayner Architects of New York, to give the building extra flare. Gluckman has designed a residence in the Northwest, but he's best known for galleries and museums such as the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and the Mori Museum in Tokyo.

MulvannyG2 Architecture is the managing architect and architect of record. Zena Design Group is the interior designer.

Alec Carlin, project manager with R.C. Hedreen, said his company wanted to “raise the bar” by bringing in a well-known New York architect. He said Hedreen wanted Olive 8 to have a high profile design, like the Central Library and Experience Music Project.

“This building is going to have the same sort of landmark status,” said Carlin. “We're making [Denny Triangle] into a vibrant part of the city, and this is the flagship.”

Gluckman described Hedreen as a “client willing to experiment,” allowing him to make the building stand out.

One of Olive 8's most distinctive features will be the podium. It will have large cut-outs that resemble eggs or elipses.

“It started with a hand sketch of organic shapes,” he said. “I liked the shape and realized that if you rotate it, it looks like it's rolling.”

Gluckman also experimented with using images of sine waves at the base of another building.

He said he wanted an animated facade that begins with the egg shapes at the base and extends upward with the use of lightly and heavily fritted glass, as well as blue-tinted glass. The building has several zones — each with different combinations of glass types.

The egg-shaped cut-outs will allow people on the street to look inside at parties, meetings or people working out in the health club.

“If there is a party going on, we wanted those elements to be visible from the outside,” Gluckman said.

Craig Davenport and Ted Caloger, principals at MulvannyG2, said Hedreen originally hired their firm to be the design architect. MulvannyG2 was into early concept design when Hedreen decided to put Gluckman in the lead design role.

“He thought it would be intriguing to do something pretty cutting-edge,” said Caloger, referring to Hedreen. “Most of the time we have been the design architects and hired another firm to be the architect of record. In this instance, the roles were reversed.”

Hedreen hired MulvannyG2 to design the Grand Hyatt in downtown, and Caloger believed Hedreen wanted a similarly conservative design for Olive 8.

“He changed his thinking,” said Davenport. “We were caught off-guard because Dick (Hedreen) is a traditional guy.”

Caloger said his firm regularly does cutting-edge designs outside the country, in places like China. But he said Olive 8 is a break from tradition.

“If you look around the city at the design architects — Callison, NBBJ, ZGF — this is something they probably wouldn't do for a residential tower, maybe in part because of our familiarity with the design review process,” said Caloger. “But if you come from out of town and have international name recognition, you can shoot for the moon.”

Blaine Weber of Weber + Thompson said hiring celebrity architects may appeal to some developers. “It is a trend we see in some larger cities,” he said. But Weber said there are often extra costs due to more complex designs.

As the former chair of the Design Review Board in Seattle, Weber said board members review projects solely on “good design principles,” and high profile architects must meet those standards just like everyone else.

Caloger said he expects his firm will “push the envelope more” with upcoming residential towers in downtown Seattle.

He expected the trend among East Coast high-rise residential developers to hire notable architects will spread west. “Having a name associated with a design attracts buyers,” said Caloger.
__________________
Now you see that evil will always triumph because good is dumb.

Dry Hair is for Squids
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #297  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2006, 7:04 PM
mSeattle's Avatar
mSeattle mSeattle is offline
Socialism 4 Extreme Rich?
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: here
Posts: 9,002
^ Thanks for posting that, Anton. Great to see some pressure against the design/review process. Hopefully this will be the beginning of some shake-up in the process where local design and review gives us the dull designs while these same local designers build stunning things outside of the country.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #298  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2006, 4:17 AM
Lord Baphomet's Avatar
Lord Baphomet Lord Baphomet is offline
人至贱则无敌
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 6,813
Who knows if this will ever come to fruition, but by the way things have been going on in Seattle these last couple of years--I guess anything's possible. Luckily as of late, when it comes to these types of projects, mayor Nickles has been having his way more often than the meddling Steinbrueck. Let's hope it happens with this proposal as well--and this time around, fuck the FAA, build the extra 35 feet or so and put it over 1000ft.

Mayor asks council to back new plan, save sanctuary
By Stuart Eskenazi

Seattle Times staff reporter

A blockwide hole in the ground where the Public Safety Building once stood is being viewed as an opening in the continuing efforts to save a historic church sanctuary building.

For that scenario to transpire, however, the Seattle City Council would have to modify its long-held vision that reserves two-thirds of the downtown block for a public plaza, with the rest set aside for a small-scale building.

Two council members — Jan Drago and Peter Steinbrueck — say they are unwilling to scrap that plan.

"I think council members will stay the course and carry out our vision," Drago predicted.

Mayor Greg Nickels, however, is urging the council to take another look.

"Circumstances change and opportunities pop up," Deputy Mayor Tim Ceis said. "Let's not be so rigid that we overlook an opportunity to do two special things at once."

At the mayor's request, developer David Sabey came up with an idea for preserving First United Methodist Church's architecturally distinctive domed sanctuary, a near-century-old building on the corner of Fifth Avenue and Marion Street. Sabey would buy the church property and keep the sanctuary if the city sells him the Public Safety Building block and lets him build a skyscraper there that could be as tall as Columbia Center — far bigger than what the council ever had in mind.

The plaza would shrink to a half-block, and Sabey would assume ownership and control of it. Drago and Steinbrueck are not willing to cede the plaza to a private developer.

Council members envision the plaza as a public place for Seattleites to gather and socialize, where scheduled performances and protests would take center stage. For big events, the city could block off Fourth Avenue to create an outdoor mall extending to the new City Hall's plaza and steps.

"We've got to seize the opportunity and create an enduring civic space for future generations," Steinbrueck said. "It's important and meaningful to have a place where people can interact with their government and express themselves."

For longer than a decade, the council has had designs on the city-owned parcel, which is the final piece of a three-block Civic Center campus that includes the new Justice Center and cascades down the hill into the new City Hall.

Drago said she might consider shrinking the plaza a smidge, but not to half the block. Current zoning for the block permits a building up to about 40 stories high, although the council's stated preference is for one of about only 20 stories.

Steinbrueck said three developers have submitted conceptual plans that fall within the council vision.

Details of the Sabey proposal, which was solicited independently by the mayor, are open to negotiation — if only council members would sit down to discuss them, said Jim Kneeland, Sabey spokesman. Both Steinbrueck and Drago opted not to meet with Sabey.

"To deal separately with a proposal that is inconsistent with our vision would be unfair to the other submitters as a matter of process," Steinbrueck said.

Sabey is proposing to pay the city fair-market value for the block, possibly between $20 million and $30 million. Kneeland said the council ought to step away from the formal process and give Sabey's proposal consideration.

"This is an opportunity for the city to explore and find a way to do this project right and get a maximum value for its property," he said. "If instead the city becomes handcuffed by process, then taxpayers are at the disadvantage."

Kneeland said the city stands to benefit because Sabey's building would be built to attract the headquarters of a Fortune 500 company.

Drago said the city seeks to extract more benefit from the block than just money.

Officials believe a public plaza in that part of downtown can be welcoming and safe, unlike a park one block south that is nicknamed Muscatel Meadows because so many street alcoholics congregate there.

If the council rejects Sabey's proposal, the church could accept a previous offer from developer Martin Selig that razes the First United sanctuary.

Drago and Steinbrueck both said they want the sanctuary to remain standing, but Drago added that it is not the city's mission to save it from demolition.

Stuart Eskenazi: 206-464-2293 or seskenazi@seattletimes.com

Copyright © 2006 The Seattle Times Company
__________________
Now you see that evil will always triumph because good is dumb.

Dry Hair is for Squids
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #299  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2006, 4:26 AM
James Bond Agent 007's Avatar
James Bond Agent 007 James Bond Agent 007 is offline
Posh
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Seattle-Upon-Rust
Posts: 16,810
Quote:
Sabey would buy the church property and keep the sanctuary if the city sells him the Public Safety Building block and lets him build a skyscraper there that could be as tall as Columbia Center — far bigger than what the council ever had in mind.
Sounds good to me!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #300  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2006, 4:43 AM
JiminyCricket II's Avatar
JiminyCricket II JiminyCricket II is offline
turbin flashing=knockuout
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: San Jose y Milan
Posts: 3,646
what was far more interesting to me was:

Quote:
Kneeland said the city stands to benefit because Sabey's building would be built to attract the headquarters of a Fortune 500 company.
Developers dont just build a tower and hope some fortune 500 company says "that looks good." They have to have some sort of purpose for wanting to build a 900+ footer. My guess - Amazon is watching this closely.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:49 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.