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  #1141  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 3:53 AM
LookingUp LookingUp is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msutton
I'd be interested to see if they actually have any projects under construction right now.

EDIT: Never mind. Hadn't yet finished the video. I guess they do not have anything going on or starting in the immediate future. It will be interesting to see if anything comes of this group.
I was told they have a site in the Victory area. I am trying to get more info. I hope they are real - the design and construction industries are full of waste and inefficiency. I used to be in manufacturing and we were always under tremendous pressure to improve. We did - or we went broke. It isn't that way for design/construction. It's the same way for decades. Enough already - we need more high-rises.

I'll keep track of their progress. I want more high-rises and I've never heard of any group or developer trying to solve the inefficency of a tired industry. Wake up architects and contractors. Maybe it's time to begin thinking about being more efficient.

I really hope everything I saw on their video is true - our cities need more people. Many of them living in the sky - it's nice up here.
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  #1142  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 4:17 AM
msutton msutton is offline
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Look forward to hearing more on your investigation.

Ninja, if you get a chance to post those awesome pictures of the W and Victory Plaza that you posted today on DallasMetropolis over here, I think people would really enjoy them. I know I did.
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  #1143  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 4:34 AM
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Wasn't the 45-story tower in Victory supposed to have started by now ?
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  #1144  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 8:28 AM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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I'd say that generally projects have started about 3-6 months after their original announcement state in Dallas. A lot of the projects are simply announced early.
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  #1145  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 9:09 AM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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Cirque



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  #1146  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 9:13 AM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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Victory update
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  #1147  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 9:37 AM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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Downtown tower may house poor
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcon...rd.d0d4690.html
Ministry plans to buy, turn site near Arts District into low-income units
11:52 PM CST on Monday, March 6, 2006
By STEVE BROWN / Staff Writer

Central Dallas Ministries has contracted to purchase a vacant downtown office tower with plans to convert it into low- and moderate-income housing.

The 511 N. Akard building ? next door to the Downtown YMCA and near the Arts District ? would be turned into small apartments that would house low-income residents.

Built to house offices of the Southern Baptist Convention and other tenants, the 167,000-square-foot office tower at 511 N. Akard has been vacant for more than a decade.

"We are proposing to develop 209 units of high-quality, very affordable housing, including about 100 units of housing for formerly homeless individuals and 100 units of housing for low-income individuals," Larry James, chief executive officer of the social service organization, said Monday.

But the proposal will probably draw criticism from some property owners who won't relish the idea of a low-income housing project in that area of downtown.

"Ross Avenue is now Dallas' main street," said real estate broker Newt Walker, who is one of the opponents of the city homeless center planned near the Farmers Market.

"No one is against the homeless. It's a location issue."

Dallas City Council member Angela Hunt, whose district includes downtown, said downtown needs a wide range of housing. "We need some residential properties that will provide housing for folks who aren't making million-dollar incomes," she said.

She said the project will have a relatively low density and won't have on-site services.

Along with the rental units, the 15-story office tower would house retail space on the ground floor and two floors of offices for Central Dallas Ministries, Mr. James said.

The project would cost more than $19 million, to be funded by a combination of loans, grants, and city and state funding.

"We are responding to the revitalization of downtown and the need for downtown's labor market to have places to live," Mr. James said. "Not everyone can live in a $2,500-a-month condo."

Units in the proposed residential complex would start at about $350 a month and would be supported by government rent subsidizes and housing vouchers, he said.

Central Dallas Development Corp., an affiliate of Central Dallas Ministries, has applied for a $1.2 million grant from the Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs and is seeking $1.75 million in bond money from the city of Dallas to fund the project.

Central Dallas Ministries also receives private-sector support from donors including Bank of America, Kraft Foods, Haynes & Boone LLP and Fannie Mae, according to the group's Web site.


The nonprofit organization will seek historic tax credits for the building, which opened in 1959. "Part of our plan is to go for historic tax credits, which would allow us to fundamentally restore its exterior," Mr. James said.

Built to house offices of the Southern Baptist Convention and other tenants, the 167,000-square-foot office tower has been vacant for more than a decade.

Several developers have looked at converting the tower into homes. In 1999, a Canadian builder announced plans to convert it into a luxury condo project. But the redevelopment was never completed.

Mr. James said that while several floors of the tower have been cleared, the building interior still needs considerable demolition and asbestos abatement.

McCaslin Development ? a longtime Dallas apartment builder and commercial real estate investor ? will be co-developer of the project, called City Walk at Akard.

The building is in an area of downtown that is seeing a renaissance, with construction of the nearby Hunt Consolidated headquarters and developments planned a few blocks away in the Arts District.

Officials with Downtown Dallas, formerly the Central Dallas Association, said they would support redevelopment of the 511 N. Akard building.

"I found out about it just last week, and we are going to take a look at it one step at a time," said John Crawford, chairman of the business group. "It's important for everyone to understand that unless it is a quality project, it doesn't do anybody any good.

"Hopefully it will have a positive impact on downtown," he said.

Mr. James said he met with Dallas' economic development and housing committee members on Monday, where the project got favorable reviews.

The City Council will still have to decide whether to support the development.

"We have until the end of September to close our purchase," Mr. James said. "We have looked at almost every vacant building in downtown Dallas.

"There is no project like this in Dallas currently."

Developments that get homeless people off the streets and provide safe and affordable housing are increasingly common in major cities, said Dallas-based housing analyst Ron Witten.

"You see these kinds of projects in Portland and Los Angeles and Minneapolis and lots of cities," he said. "I'm sure there is a need."

While several of downtown's loft apartment buildings have set aside units for moderate-income renters, this will be the first building targeted at the affordable housing market.

Central Dallas Ministries has already developed a half dozen low- and moderate-income housing projects in East Dallas.

Single-room occupancy apartments, called SROs, are considered critical to solving Dallas' homeless problem.

The city's Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness calls for 700 of the one-room apartments to be built by 2014. City officials set aside part of the $23.8 million November bond election for SROs.

The rest of the bond money will be spent on a Homeless Assistance Center, where homeless people can receive a variety of services, including emergency shelter, mental health or substance abuse treatment and job training.

Once homeless people become stabilized at the planned assistance center, they will need places to live. But the region has a shortage of affordable housing, especially for those who survive on extremely low incomes. Many homeless people receive or may be eligible for disability checks of less than $600 a month. Dallas currently has 125 SROs, while Houston has more than 1,000.

"We can't bring them in off the streets and not have a place for them to go," said Cindy Honey, executive director of the Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance. The Homeless Assistance Center "will help them through crisis stabilization, then we can try to help them in rejoining the community."

Dallas has more than 9,000 homeless, including at least 1,000 chronic homeless.

Staff writer Kim Horner contributed to this report.
Central Dallas Ministries

History: Opened as a food pantry in 1988

Services: The nonprofit organization has grown into a community development- social justice ministry that provides a variety of services, including food, health care, legal assistance and housing.

Number served: 50,000 people yearly, primarily in East Dallas and South Dallas

Budget: $4.1 million, from multiple sources, including church and private donations, United Way of Metropolitan Dallas funds, and public and private grants

Contact: www.cdm-hope.org or 214-823-8710
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  #1148  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 9:39 AM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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Joule Urban Resort by ninjatune

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  #1149  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 9:57 AM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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A simple WOW! to Ninjatune's Victory update. Simply cannot wait to see this place 'lit up'



just imagine the video screens moving around here



The W is really looking incredible



Victory Plaza West



Victory Plaza



Cirque will rise to complete the intersection



This will be an awesome view out of the south entrance of the American Airlines Center



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  #1150  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 3:12 PM
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JBinCalgary JBinCalgary is offline
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excellent progress is being made
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  #1151  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2006, 3:21 PM
TTU Arch TTU Arch is offline
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Downtown tower may house poor
Ministry plans to buy, turn site near Arts District into low-income units

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...d.d0d4690.html

11:52 PM CST on Monday, March 6, 2006
By STEVE BROWN / Staff Writer

Central Dallas Ministries has contracted to purchase a vacant downtown office tower with plans to convert it into low- and moderate-income housing.

The 511 N. Akard building – next door to the Downtown YMCA and near the Arts District – would be turned into small apartments that would house low-income residents.


DARON DEAN / DMN
Built to house offices of the Southern Baptist Convention and other tenants, the 167,000-square-foot office tower at 511 N. Akard has been vacant for more than a decade. "We are proposing to develop 209 units of high-quality, very affordable housing, including about 100 units of housing for formerly homeless individuals and 100 units of housing for low-income individuals," Larry James, chief executive officer of the social service organization, said Monday.

But the proposal will probably draw criticism from some property owners who won't relish the idea of a low-income housing project in that area of downtown.

"Ross Avenue is now Dallas' main street," said real estate broker Newt Walker, who is one of the opponents of the city homeless center planned near the Farmers Market.

"No one is against the homeless. It's a location issue."

Dallas City Council member Angela Hunt, whose district includes downtown, said downtown needs a wide range of housing. "We need some residential properties that will provide housing for folks who aren't making million-dollar incomes," she said.

She said the project will have a relatively low density and won't have on-site services.

Along with the rental units, the 15-story office tower would house retail space on the ground floor and two floors of offices for Central Dallas Ministries, Mr. James said.

The project would cost more than $19 million, to be funded by a combination of loans, grants, and city and state funding.

"We are responding to the revitalization of downtown and the need for downtown's labor market to have places to live," Mr. James said. "Not everyone can live in a $2,500-a-month condo."

Units in the proposed residential complex would start at about $350 a month and would be supported by government rent subsidizes and housing vouchers, he said.

Central Dallas Development Corp., an affiliate of Central Dallas Ministries, has applied for a $1.2 million grant from the Texas Department of Housing & Community Affairs and is seeking $1.75 million in bond money from the city of Dallas to fund the project.

Central Dallas Ministries also receives private-sector support from donors including Bank of America, Kraft Foods, Haynes & Boone LLP and Fannie Mae, according to the group's Web site.

The nonprofit organization will seek historic tax credits for the building, which opened in 1959. "Part of our plan is to go for historic tax credits, which would allow us to fundamentally restore its exterior," Mr. James said.

Built to house offices of the Southern Baptist Convention and other tenants, the 167,000-square-foot office tower has been vacant for more than a decade.

Several developers have looked at converting the tower into homes. In 1999, a Canadian builder announced plans to convert it into a luxury condo project. But the redevelopment was never completed.

Mr. James said that while several floors of the tower have been cleared, the building interior still needs considerable demolition and asbestos abatement.

McCaslin Development – a longtime Dallas apartment builder and commercial real estate investor – will be co-developer of the project, called City Walk at Akard.

The building is in an area of downtown that is seeing a renaissance, with construction of the nearby Hunt Consolidated headquarters and developments planned a few blocks away in the Arts District.

Officials with Downtown Dallas, formerly the Central Dallas Association, said they would support redevelopment of the 511 N. Akard building.

"I found out about it just last week, and we are going to take a look at it one step at a time," said John Crawford, chairman of the business group. "It's important for everyone to understand that unless it is a quality project, it doesn't do anybody any good.

"Hopefully it will have a positive impact on downtown," he said.

Mr. James said he met with Dallas' economic development and housing committee members on Monday, where the project got favorable reviews.

The City Council will still have to decide whether to support the development.

"We have until the end of September to close our purchase," Mr. James said. "We have looked at almost every vacant building in downtown Dallas.

"There is no project like this in Dallas currently."

Developments that get homeless people off the streets and provide safe and affordable housing are increasingly common in major cities, said Dallas-based housing analyst Ron Witten.

"You see these kinds of projects in Portland and Los Angeles and Minneapolis and lots of cities," he said. "I'm sure there is a need."

While several of downtown's loft apartment buildings have set aside units for moderate-income renters, this will be the first building targeted at the affordable housing market.

Central Dallas Ministries has already developed a half dozen low- and moderate-income housing projects in East Dallas.

Single-room occupancy apartments, called SROs, are considered critical to solving Dallas' homeless problem.

The city's Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness calls for 700 of the one-room apartments to be built by 2014. City officials set aside part of the $23.8 million November bond election for SROs.

The rest of the bond money will be spent on a Homeless Assistance Center, where homeless people can receive a variety of services, including emergency shelter, mental health or substance abuse treatment and job training.

Once homeless people become stabilized at the planned assistance center, they will need places to live. But the region has a shortage of affordable housing, especially for those who survive on extremely low incomes. Many homeless people receive or may be eligible for disability checks of less than $600 a month. Dallas currently has 125 SROs, while Houston has more than 1,000.

"We can't bring them in off the streets and not have a place for them to go," said Cindy Honey, executive director of the Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance. The Homeless Assistance Center "will help them through crisis stabilization, then we can try to help them in rejoining the community."

Dallas has more than 9,000 homeless, including at least 1,000 chronic homeless.
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  #1152  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2006, 3:32 AM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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another WOW! shot of the Victory construction by Ninjatune.

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  #1153  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2006, 5:23 AM
LookingUp LookingUp is offline
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One Arts Plaza constructions costs are now reported to be exceeding $300 per-sq-ft. How can they make any money?
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  #1154  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2006, 6:46 PM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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Victory progress by Ninjatune

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  #1155  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2006, 5:43 AM
LookingUp LookingUp is offline
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Dallas Potential

Dallas has a lot more potential than the limitied activity in the Victory/Turtle Creek area.

There are thousands of potential buyers for the urban (hopefully high-rise) lifestyle in Dallas. Where are the Developers?

San Diego (smaller than DFW) will deliver 5,000 units of high-rise living this year - Dallas will be lucky to complete 1,000. What is the problem?

Maybe someone in Dallas knows. I'll be there next week asking the same question. Save me the time - tell me what's up? (Or, not up).

Thoughtful responses appreciated.

Still - Looking Up.
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  #1156  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2006, 11:58 AM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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^I think you simply haven't read very much of this thread
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  #1157  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2006, 2:10 PM
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eburress eburress is offline
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He must be looking for the CliffsNotes version.
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  #1158  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2006, 3:57 PM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookingUp
Dallas has a lot more potential than the limitied activity in the Victory/Turtle Creek area.

There are thousands of potential buyers for the urban (hopefully high-rise) lifestyle in Dallas. Where are the Developers?

San Diego (smaller than DFW) will deliver 5,000 units of high-rise living this year - Dallas will be lucky to complete 1,000. What is the problem?

Maybe someone in Dallas knows. I'll be there next week asking the same question. Save me the time - tell me what's up? (Or, not up).

Thoughtful responses appreciated.

Still - Looking Up.
OK, I'll play along.

- The activity is not limited to Turtle Creek and Victory. There is also construction downtown, Uptown, north Dallas, Oak Lawn and in the Platinum Corridor
- The activity is not limited to new construction. There are a huge amount of highrise space being converted to residential downtown. I don't know if San Diego has nearly the stock of older highrises that Dallas does.
- Dallas (DFW) has more space than San Diego. No mountains, hills or oceans. Most activity you see will be of the townhome and midrise variety. Of which, there is a ton under construction. I have no real idea how many units.
- If you're going to use the population of DFW, then use metro DFW. That would include all of Dallas, Plano, Frisco, Las Colinas, Southlake, Addison, and downtown Fort Worth that are currently building urban type living units.
- What I've updated lately has been what's in the news and what our local photographers have documented. That's doesn't mean that is all that is happening. I can think of a few that I haven't even documented on this thread in months like Villa Rosa, Azure, Ritz-Carlton, 1700 Main, Park Lane Place, the 3 towers going up in Far North Dallas, all the new stuff in Las Colinas or the new stuff in Frisco and Plano. There is even more that will break ground in the next few months.
- If you really want more updated info, I suggest forums.dallasmetropolis.com

would also like to mention the lack of housing bubble here. Dallas can never build at the pace of places in such bubbles. Prices are much too steady.
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  #1159  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2006, 9:30 PM
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LookingUp, a lot of urban dwellers from other cities do end up moving to Dallas, but many of them end up buying a single famliy house (or a town house) when they see what they can get for the money.

You're right Owlhorn. Dallas (DFW) has a lot of flat land compared to many other large metros. The DFW area also has a great highway network, making is easy to get around the metro area. This causes the sprawl to extend way out and doesn't allow the market price in the city center to sky rocket. Without the sky high market prices, we don't see as many high rise condos compared to other cities that are near to mountains and/or water.

For the price of a high rise condo in central Dallas, you can get a much larger townhouse within 10 minutes of central Dallas. If you don't mind driving 30 to 40 minutes, you can get a huge single family house in suburbs for the price of a high rise condo in the city center.

So the contruction activity in DFW is on fire, but much of it is single family, townhouse, low rise apartments/condos and garden apartments. That's how DFW was able to pack in 150,000 people per year since 1990. (and expected to do so until the metro reaches at least 10 million people)

Here's a typical article from today's local papaer. These types of articles are usually not posted:

Townhouses to replace Oak Lawn units

09:15 AM CST on Thursday, March 16, 2006

By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News


Developers have bought up several Oak Lawn apartment complexes with plans to replace the rental units with townhouses.

Prescott Realty Group – the same company that's building high-rise condos at the Stoneleigh Hotel – plans to construct more than 100 townhouses on Newton, Gilbert and Bowser streets just south of Highland Park.

The first phase of the project is being built in partnership with CityView.

The California-based company was started by former San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros to build urban housing. Mr. Cisneros is also a former secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

"Prescott Realty Group started on Prescott Street owning and redeveloping duplexes and apartments from the late 1990s," said president Jud Pankey.

"We have now found opportunities to go back into the neighborhood and begin a redevelopment process."

The first 58 townhouses on Newton Street near Douglas Avenue will replace about 84 apartments built in the 1960s.

"The first units should be available in January," said Prescott Realty director Louis Rothermell.

Designed by architect Good Fulton & Farrell of Dallas, the three-story units will be built starting this month.

The condominiums will range from 1,600 to 2,600 square feet and will cost between $375,000 and $550,000.

"It's all masonry for the most part on the exterior," said architect David Farrell. "Modernism is taking a fresh start in Dallas, and that's what we wanted here."

After the Newton Street project is done, Prescott will move on to another location on nearby Gilbert and construct 30 more units.

"We think there is a niche in the marketplace for higher-end townhomes," said Prescott Realty managing director Vance Detwiler.

David Griffin Realtors has been hired to market the Oak Lawn project.

Most of the condo and townhouse projects in that neighborhood are smaller, Mr. Griffin said.

"Since they have been able to acquire so much land, they are able to make an architectural statement," he said. "And there is not a better Oak Lawn location."

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com

Online at: http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont....188a0e54.html
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  #1160  
Old Posted Mar 17, 2006, 10:40 AM
Owlhorn Owlhorn is offline
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Ritz-Carlton progress by Texan#1

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