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  #221  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2006, 4:14 AM
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I have noticed the same thing...not only on Dexter Avenue, but in other areas downtown. BTW, someone from the Brown Chambless Architectural firm told me that work on the "New Orleans style alleyway" is now about to begin, finally.


Hey, maybe your good friend Josh could be that developer that would make our great vision for Dexter Avenue a reality...
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  #222  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2006, 2:18 PM
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unfortunately, right now, he is fixated on doing something on the water.

After the Commerce Building fell through, my plan #2 was new construction in the semi-vacant lot on Jefferson across from the Icehouse Apt.s and the Brewpub.

7-8 stories of condos, parking and retail on the bottom.

With a restaurant or a starbucks on the bottom, you start to get that critical mass neccessary for other development.

But we'll see.
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  #223  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2006, 12:00 AM
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Cool! A 7 or 8 story condo across from the Brew Pub would be great for that block, after all, the folks at Brown Chambless and urban design students at Auburn said that area will more than likely be marketed for condos/apts. and retail very soon. And it would be a good spot for Starbucks. It would do good business even in the warm summer nights...being right across from the ballpark.

But you know, something on the water would be awesome! Encourage him to think big!

Last edited by bystander1; Jan 28, 2006 at 12:10 AM.
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  #224  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2006, 3:39 AM
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Quote:
Union Station brings together range of businesses

By David Irvin
Montgomery Advertiser


You don't have to spend much time in Montgomery before noticing a big red building down by the train tracks.

Once visited by presidents and music stars, the gaunt Union Station has stared across downtown Montgomery for more than a century. When airplanes took over as the way to get around, the train station eventually went vacant and fell into disrepair around mid-century.

Even a year and a half ago, the building -- which is listed as a national historic landmark -- only had four tenants, said Willie D. Peak Jr., who manages the property for the city.

Today, the building has 22 tenants, many occupying multiple units, and more than 25 potential tenants waiting in line. Lawyers, accountants, bridal shops, ad agencies, a tour agency and a ministerial alliance -- organizations of all types have set up in the train depot.

But perhaps the biggest recent development is a brand new salon and day spa called Paragón, which offers a variety of services -- from $20 haircuts to $600 extensions. The salon is holding its grand opening Monday.

"Basically (the owner) chose it because of the riverfront renovations," said Debra Anderson, the manager of Paragón.

The salon is split between a third-floor and fourth-floor loft. Customers on the top level can look out across the river as they have their hair primped, sculpted or extended.

The space is open inside the depot, with tall ceilings and an unconventional floor plan that allows for great intermixing between the clients of one business and the principals of another.

For instance, a couple of accountants have offices virtually inside Paragón, just feet away from a lounge area in what used to be the attic of the depot.

Just down the hall, another brand new tenant was working hard Monday. The Ad Associates, a firm that brings together three firms in the Montgomery marketing business, has just moved into a fourth-floor suite.

"Even though they redid it, they kept the same feel and the integrity of the architectural design of a building of this era," Gina Dickinson, a senior partner in the firm, said in her new office she moved into this month.

She said the downtown area is fast becoming the hot place for businesses, with the revitalization of the old Montgomery area around Coosa and Bibb streets, and the economic injection that came along with Riverwalk Stadium just a few blocks away.

But that hip flare of the train station has only so much to do with it.

Another thing going for the building is the rate the city of Montgomery charges for the space. Management and lessees agreed, the rates available in the shed are very competitive -- about $13 to $15 per square foot.

One office, about 14 by 14 feet, goes for $229 a month on a one-year lease.

Built in 1898, the train depot is one of the "larger and more elaborate" stations still standing in the South, according to the Alabama Historical Commission. Costing $200,000 to build, the station served as the major point of entry and exit from Montgomery for decades.

The advent of air travel ended that, but throughout the years President Theodore Roosevelt and many celebrities crossed into Montgomery there. As late as 1960, President Lyndon Johnson made a whistle stop during a presidential campaign.

In the early 1970s, the state put a big push on to get the station recognized as a historically significant site. In 1973, it was added to the United States historic list and in 1977 it became Alabama's 18th National Historic Landmark.

One of the oldest tenants, Lek's Railroad Thai restaurant has been in the station since the 1990s.
their pic.




My pic

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  #225  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2006, 6:00 AM
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This shows that more professional and more upscale-type businesses are really buying into the riverfront development plan and considering it the place to be in the region. It will continue with the opening of the luxury hotel across the street among others things. It's good to see Union Station coming back this way.
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  #226  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2006, 5:05 AM
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Yeah, everyone wants to be in or close to downtown again...




January 30, 2006

New buyers sold on old neighborhoods

By Julie Arrington
Montgomery Advertiser

Holly and Jim Wrye wanted character and history when they were house shopping three years ago. They found it on Cloverdale Road.

The Cloverdale area, with its tree-lined streets and quaint homes, is what real estate agents see as the hot spot in Montgomery for singles and families. Its resurgence mirrors a trend across the country of old neighborhoods getting new life.

"It's what they call a 'back-to-the-city' movement, and Montgomery minus four or five years has started getting on the bandwagon," said Sandra Nickel, whose real estate office is in the middle of Cloverdale.

Nickel attributes the area's newfound popularity somewhat to a growing disenchantment with subdivisions.

"I think part of it has to do with the fact that people are tired of the concept of commuting, and I don't think they're particularly enamored anymore of shopping centers," she said. "They're looking for a walkable experience, and that's what areas like Cloverdale/Idlewild and the Garden District offer."

Buyers also are getting more house for less money in the older neighborhoods, Nickel said, and some simply are moving back to where they grew up.

"They just don't want any part of the suburbs," she said. "They want to come home."

The Wryes considered other areas of town, but settled on Cloverdale Road because of what it looks like -- lots of trees -- and who lives there -- families with young children.

Holly Wrye stays home with Jack, 2, and 6-month-old Max, while Jim Wrye heads off to the Alabama Education Association, just a short drive away.

"We did look out east, but when it came down to it, all the houses that we ended up liking were on this side of town, so it was kind of a done deal for my husband and I," explained Holly Wrye.

The Wryes bought a house in move-in condition.

"He wanted a fixer-upper; it had already been fixed, God bless the couple before us," said Holly Wrye of her husband, who is AEA's public relations director. "So he just had minor things to do. He got to dabble in it, but I got to live in it."

Bars and restaurants, a coffee shop and the Capri Theatre, which shows mostly art-house and independent films, bring a mix of people to Cloverdale. They come for a night out, and they come to make their home.

"I like to say young, old, gay, straight, rich, poor, black, white, a ring through the nose to the most arch-conservative, they're all here together," Nickel said. "It's the melting pot of the city."

Like the Wryes, Amy and David Berry looked at houses all over Montgomery but kept going back to the Cloverdale/Idlewild neighborhood, where David grew up.

"I thought it had so much more charm over here, and a lot of our friends are moving back to the neighborhood, too," Amy Berry said. "There was a lot more character I thought, and I like that real eclectic, 'cottagey'-type style, and I like all the mature trees that we have."

Berry also loves being close to the bars and restaurants. She goes to Café Louisa for a cup of coffee and a granola bar every day after dropping her 2-year-old daughter off at school.

"I also love just walking up to Sinclair's (restaurant)," she said.

Connie Colvin has lived in Cloverdale/Idlewild since 1974 and is delighted to see the neighborhood making a comeback.

"For about 10 years we had a lot of older people and most of them are gone," she said. "They've either passed away, or they're in assisted living."

Besides families like the Berrys, singles are snapping up homes in Cloverdale/Idlewild. Colvin has four new neighbors, all single women in their mid-30s to mid-40s. Each bought a home, and one completely redid hers.

"It's really nice to see that the young people are coming in," she said.

----------------------------------

Thoraudio, your condo plans may become a reality sooner than you think.
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  #227  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2006, 5:24 AM
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I still want to see a resurgence of South Blvd; and something to be done about the Montgomery Mall Property and the old Super K-Mart Property down there.

Anyone know of any exciting or positive redevelopment projects in the works for that end of town?
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  #228  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2006, 2:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bystander1
Besides families like the Berrys, singles are snapping up homes in Cloverdale/Idlewild. Colvin has four new neighbors, all single women in their mid-30s to mid-40s. Each bought a home, and one completely redid hers.
[quaqmire]giggety giggety giGGEty[/quagmire]
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  #229  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2006, 10:24 PM
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digging around and found this website.

Talks about the demolition of the Frank Leu building, and also includes some pics from the old (97) Riverwalk projects.
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  #230  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2006, 5:17 AM
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Thanks for the link. I think a renovated Frank Leu building as condos would have been great for downtown revitalization waaayy back in '97. I remember going to the building's implosion. It was kinda' cool, but kinda' sad, too. Back then the city wanted space for a hotel, but to this day it's just a parking lot.
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  #231  
Old Posted Feb 10, 2006, 1:47 PM
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Commerce building finalized. I'd have preferred my condo idea but this will be nice too.

Quote:
Commerce Building sold

By David Irvin
Montgomery Advertiser



An Indiana-based company has paid $1.7 million for the Commerce Building in downtown Montgomery and plans to convert it into a limited service hotel, its local representative said.

P&T Hospitality LLC, which operates more than 40 hotels nationwide, closed the deal Jan. 31 and set April as the start date for a yearlong renovation of the 10-story building, according to Hank Escaravage of Statewide Realty. The hotel, which will not have a restaurant, more than likely will operate under the Hilton brand.

Work on the Montgomery Civic Center and a full-service hotel across the street from the building, at 100 Commerce St., should be wrapped up by September 2007.

The six tenants in the building, which was a hotel until the 1970s, have the option of leaving without penalty or waiting until their leases expire. The First Tuskegee Bank, which occupies the first floor, will leave at the end of July, bank officials said.

"We are looking for another location inside downtown," said James W. Wright, chairman, president and CEO of First Tuskegee Bank. "We are close, but not close enough to announce."

The bank also has a branch at 2774 East Blvd. in Montgomery.

P&T's John Tampa said he chose the building because of its proximity to new development downtown.

He said he appreciates the support of the Montgomery Riverfront Development Foundation and the city.

When completed, the hotel will have 86 rooms and its first floor will be the lobby. Because of the lack of parking near the building, P&T plans to use valets until it finds a permanent solution.
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  #232  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2006, 12:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thoraudio
unofficial word on the street (what does that mean?) is that 100 Commerce St. will be reborn as a Hampton Inn/Suites.

Wow, Thoraudio! You were right again...of course. Except now they're saying it will be a Hilton brand hotel. Man, it's nice to have the inside scoop on developments like you do.

Did you work with the current buyers in any way? If so, how?

I liked your condo proposal too, but I guess with so much development in that area and tourism growing at such a rapid rate downtown, maybe they felt that a hotel will make an even faster impact and return on their investment.

That will give your condo proposal (and other developers' proposals) even higher priority as each developer will want to get its project off the ground quickly so they can be first to fill the leases.
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  #233  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2006, 4:50 AM
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It looks like the mayor is going to move out of the sprawl and into downtown...where he works. He bought the building where I was born . Plus it's in an area downtown that is seeing new growth.

I just saw this story on the news tonight and also on the Advertiser's website:


February 10, 2006

Bright investing in downtown

By Sebastian Kitchen
Montgomery Advertiser



Montgomery Mayor Bobby Bright is investing more than the city’s money in downtown development.

Last month, Bright purchased a building near the federal courthouse and has future plans for a downtown loft and office.

As mayor, Bright’s top priority has been the redevelopment of downtown and millions of city dollars have gone into a variety of projects including Riverwalk Stadium, the amphitheater, the civic center renovations, the intermodal bus facility and other improvements along the riverfront.

Bright personally spent $235,000 for the building and said he plans to spend several hundred thousand dollars to renovate the ailing property.

“Somebody’s got to bite the bullet,” he said. “Somebody has got to set the example.”

Bright said he has dreamed of living downtown since before he was elected and felt the “itch” after touring other downtown lofts. He was attracted by the building’s location, which is close to the Catoma Street post office, the federal courthouse and the construction of the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

The small two-story building, located at the corner of Church and Catoma streets, has a brick facade and an accompanying parking lot. He said the building was once a medical facility where his administrative assistant, Katie Cord, and Council President Charles Jinright were born.

Bright has been very critical of downtown property owners who have purchased property as an investment and allowed the buildings to remain boarded up and deteriorate. He said he will not allow his property to rot and will take action to remove the boards, repair the roof and make other necessary improvements.

Bright said the purchase is a personal investment is not connected to any city project.

Once the building is renovated, Bright said he plans to sell his house in Wynlakes and move into downtown.

Bright said he does not have exact plans for the future of the building or a timeline to renovate the structure. He said he will renovate it as money permits, but plans to finish the work before he completes his time as mayor.

“I would like to do it soon,” he said. “I am really searching for a way to pull the boards off of the windows and revitalize it.”

Consultants for downtown revitalization have also reiterated the need for more residences downtown and this will help fill that need, the mayor said.

Bright sold another piece of his downtown property to the county last year for the expansion of the detention facility. He said he used the $149,000 from the sale towards his new property. Bright said he did not want to sell the property on Hull Street, which he owned since the early 1990s.

Bright owned several properties when he was elected, but moved out of the real estate business while he was in office. He said he was trying to avoid any appearance of impropriety, but consultants told him he should set an example by purchasing and renovating deteriorating downtown property.
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  #234  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2006, 7:53 PM
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Once-vibrant mall faces uncertain future

By David Irvin
Montgomery Advertiser




Montgomery Mall is jammed with shoppers Nov. 26, 1988.





A calendar in the management office of Montgomery Mall reads "If money could talk, mine would say 'goodbye.' "

It's meant to be a statement on the excesses of shopping, but these days it's also a sad commentary on the nearly 40-year-old shopping center itself.

Store after store sits vacant, and the reason why depends on who you ask. Almost everyone, though, offers one of two reasons, often both: crime and race.

The owner, Ohio-based Glimcher Realty Trust, is even so tired of battling the perceptions that it's willing to sell at the right price.

Some experts assert that the mall, which opened in 1968, is nearing the end of its life. Others believe its best years lie ahead.

Either way, the on-the-ground reality is difficult to ignore.

Department store Parisian is leaving by March, the third anchor to pull out in three years. It follows Dillard's and JC Penney. Gone also are the likes of Victoria's Secret, Lane Bryant, Piccadilly Cafeteria and Eddie Bauer.

Mall officials would not release the most recent fill rates, but the 2004 report shows 70 percent store occupancy.

Numbers don't lie

Shoppers, even retailers use the number of blacks living near Southern Boulevard and McGehee Road to explain the mall's demise.

Chad Emerson, who is a law professor and an expert in urban planning, doesn't buy the social-economic excuse.

"If you draw a five-mile circle around the mall," said Emerson, who teaches at Faulkner University, "you ... also bring in some extremely high economic demographics."

Census data backs Emerson up. The wealthiest parts of the city in terms of per capita income are directly north and west of the mall.

As for crime, the Montgomery Police Department has not changed the way it patrols the mall but acknowledges fewer shoppers mean every shopper is safer. Capt. Huey Thornton maintains crime is not a big problem at the mall because "there is a lot less businesses in the mall than there used to be."

Still, old notions are hard to change, and Michael Bird knows because he's trying to change them.

After the Parisian closing was announced, Bird fired off a letter to the editor about the misperception that high crime only exists on the south and west sides of the city. The east side, he wrote, has just as many "drug and thug problems."

Bird said he believes the mall is in decline for many reasons, one of them being negativity in the media. He cited the coverage of two major events, a shooting in late 2003 and a rowdy reception for hip-hop star Ludacris a year later.

"If people run away from the problem ... then you set up a terrible dichotomy. You have the 'haves' and the 'have nots' at war with each other," said Bird, who predicts Eastdale Mall will have similar problems if Montgomery Mall fails.

In good company

Emerson advocates a theory of development known as "smart growth," in which housing and commercial properties stand together. If that theory is true, the traditional, enclosed mall has simply run its course.

The case could be made that Montgomery's first mall, Normandale Shopping Center at 572 E. Patton Ave., shows what Emerson is talking about.

Built in 1952, it originally had an anchor department store -- Loveman's -- and many fine specialty shops on either wing. Today, its major tenant is Calhoun Foods. Some of the other businesses are a Compass Bank branch, Dollar General, It's Fashion, Maxway, Pizza Hut and H&R Block.

"What has happened in Montgomery Mall will happen in Eastdale Mall in X number of years. Then it will go on to the next mall," Emerson said. "None of these malls are built in a mixed-use, sustainable way."

To drive home his point, Emerson cites Deadmalls.com. The privately run Web site acts as a memorial to hundreds of traditional malls nationwide that are dying or already dead.

The International Council of Shopping Centers, however, doesn't buy that a mall has a "life cycle." A mall's success has to do with "what people have done to make sure malls stay vital," said council spokeswoman Patrice Duker.

Steve Floyd's property company turned Cloverleaf Mall in Hattiesburg, Miss., inside-out. It went from four outside-accessible stores to a dozen. Today, the retail occupancy rate stands at 98 percent.

Montgomery Mall has even transformed itself once.

Built in 1968, Montgomery Mall was challenged by the newer Eastdale Mall in the late 1970s. Only a few years later, Montgomery Mall expanded so Parisian as well as several other stores could move in.

The updating bought the shopping center some time. Then, in late 2003, the Shoppes at EastChase pulled away Montgomery Mall's most critical anchor, Dillard's.

Reincarnation

City leaders blame the mall's problems on Glimcher's management.

"With the right management and the right ownership, that mall can work," said City Councilman Glen Pruitt, who represents the district where Montgomery Mall is located.

Emerson, though, thinks putting office, retail and commercial space together would breathe new life into Montgomery Mall as well as the surrounding areas.

Glimcher officials like the mixed-use approach but insist they need to land a big retailer to anchor the project.

"We are probably taking more of a 'clean sheet of paper' look at it," said chief operating officer Marshall Loeb, who also insists the mall is not being actively marketed for sale.

Loeb recognizes the mall hasn't done well, blaming local competition for seizing most of the momentum in the market.

Pruitt remains skeptical about the mixed-use development idea.

"I've been hearing this now for almost (the) two years I've been on the council," he said. "I'm ready for someone to show me something."

The mixed-use approach worked for the 1960s-era Winter Park Mall in Winter Park, Fla., which declined severely in the 1980s after losing many of its major tenants. The developers transformed the property into an outdoors open-air market, incorporating loft apartments, restaurants and retail space.

Today, it is filled.
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  #235  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2006, 6:00 AM
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February 18, 2006


Smarter living ahead for Montgomery

By Sebastian Kitchen
Montgomery Advertiser

Henry and Kate Barnett were not looking for a new home when they toured The Waters development last year. But after finding large oaks lining narrow streets, big porches, acres of public space, lakes and pleasant neighbors, they were sold.

The Barnetts have lived in the east Montgomery County development for a month. They are enamored with their new lifestyle. Smaller lots with less yard work. A beautiful walkable neighborhood.

"We can enjoy the beauty and not worry about the responsibility," Kate Barnett said of their small lot and the acres of public green space.

Soon, close to their home, contractors will build a variety of structures: lofts with space to live and work, retail plots, bungalows, condominiums, townhouses, and houses on larger lots.

The mixed use is legal in Pike Road, where The Waters is located, and is now allowed in the city of Montgomery after the City Council passed smart code last month.

Smart code experts believe people are drawn to the well-planned developments because of the attention to beauty, green space, interaction with neighbors and the focus on people being able to walk to most of their daily needs.

Developments such as The Waters are rare in the region, but the council action opened the door in Montgomery. Before, small businesses could not be located next to houses, and bakers and attorneys could not live above their business. Lofts were not legal.

Smart code applies traditional town design people appreciate in Old Cloverdale. Families can walk to a movie, to coffee, dinner or to the bookstore if they choose.

Several projects are already under way in Montgomery. Multiple downtown lofts are completed and occupied, and Anna Lowder and Harvi Sahota of City Loft Corp. are working on more.

They are also working on transforming the former A&P Grocery and adjacent property in Old Cloverdale into a commercial, retail and residential space with cottages, cafes and shops.

Lowder and Sahota are also the project managers for Hampstead, which will be Montgomery's first true smart code development and a venture of The Colonial Company. In smart code, the developer plans the project before dirt is turned. They decide where public buildings will be located, where each type of building should be situated, the width of sidewalks and the type of street lights.

Smart code developments including Hampstead and The Waters focus on town centers. People in each community will be able to walk to their basic needs within five minutes.

People are moving back into neighborhoods like Cloverdale, Idlewild and the Garden District to avoid long commutes and the gridlock, said Chad Emerson, professor at Faulkner University's Jones School of Law.

Emerson said smart code was initiated in the 1990s, adding that developments from The Waters to Seaside, Fla., are very popular.

Lowder and Sahota applauded the city for its passage of smart code and said it was a key decision.

"It turned Montgomery into one of the more progressive cities," Lowder said.

Emerson said everyone from young singles to retirees are embracing the idea that people can live above and nearby where you can buy groceries or go to the dentist.

Emerson said current zoning was born out of concerns in the first half of the 1900s from people living close to processing plants and other industry that might be detrimental to their health and quality of life.
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  #236  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2006, 7:43 PM
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I remember an article about downtown living from the Advertiser in the mid-early 90's that talked about the antiquated codes concerning 'loft' styles apts in older buildings, and how the Folmar administration actively enforced the codes and would not re-address them.

He did lots of good stuff, but thank goodness for a change.
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  #237  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2006, 7:44 PM
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Quote:
Several projects are already under way in Montgomery. Multiple downtown lofts are completed and occupied, and Anna Lowder and Harvi Sahota of City Loft Corp. are working on more.
Others are as well.
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  #238  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2006, 2:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thoraudio
Others are as well.
OK, thoraudio! Come on... Clues, Clues! Hints, Hints! Gimme gimmeeee!
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  #239  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2006, 4:28 AM
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DO any of these plans involve South Blvd? I'm all for downtown, but South Blvd. needs the redevelopment the most.
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  #240  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2006, 4:50 AM
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Here are a few items of interest that were approved at the city's planning commission meeting:





1. Transportation Plan PRESENTED BY: City of Montgomery

REPRESENTING: Same

SUBJECT: Request approval of an amendment to the City of Montgomery Comprehensive Plan, Major Thoroughfare Plan and the Access Management Plan to include a new road connecting Ray Thorington Road and Taylor Road.

REMARKS: This is an amendment to the City of Montgomery Comprehensive Plan, Major Thoroughfare Plan and the Access Management Plan to include a new road connecting Ray Thorington Road and Taylor Road to the south of Vaughn Road. The road is proposed to be functionally classified as an urban collector route. The road will be a four (4) lane road with a center median. For planning purposes the road will be called the Ray Thorington Road/Taylor Road Connector.

COUNCIL DISTRICT: 8


This road will help to begin the development of Hampstead. The "proposed arterial connection" will run across the northern edge of the development, as seen in this pic.










5. Z-08-2006 PRESENTED BY: Byron Berry

REPRESENTING: Same

SUBJECT: Request to rezone one (1) parcel of land located on the northwest corner of North Perry Street and Randolph Street from an M-1 (Light Industrial) Zoning District to a B-1-a (Central Business) Zoning District.

REMARKS: This request pertains to one (1) parcel of land. This property is surrounded by M-1 (Light Industrial) zoning. The intended use for this property if rezoned is for luxury loft condominiums on the third and fourth floors; the first floor will be converted to retail space and parking and the second floor will be used as storage or possible condominiums. The Land Use Plan recommends industrial use.

COUNCIL DISTRICT: 3

More property being snapped up and developed around the ballpark for condos.

Thoraudio, is this part of a deal you're helping to put together, as you mention in an earlier post?





6. DP-010-2006 PRESENTED BY: Gonzalez-Strength & Associates

REPRESENTING: Wal-Mart

SUBJECT: Request recommendations for development plan approval for a new building to be located on the south side of Chantilly Parkway, approximately 1,200 ft. west of Ryan Road, in a B-2 (Commercial) Zoning District.

REMARKS: This request is for recommendations to construct a 203,819 sq. ft. building with 2,739 sq. ft. of canopies. There are 1,020 paved parking spaces indicated on the site plan. There is one (1) full access and two (2) right-in/right-out access drives to Chantilly Parkway. There are also several “stub-outs” to adjoining properties. All applicable requirements will be met.

Planning Controls Comments: The proposed pylon sign will be required to be setback a minimum of 10 ft.

COUNCIL DISTRICT: Police Jurisdiction


Well, another sprawlmart. Is this any surprise? You just knew it would be a Walmart 3 years ago when McClinton & Co. first put its "another McClinton development" sign on the property. They've built all of the metro's supercenters.

I guess they figured ..."Hey, let's build 1 or 12 more"...
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