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  #1061  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2006, 7:30 PM
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Yankeebiscuitfan Yankeebiscuitfan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thoraudio
Welcome to the site! I replied to your PM... don't really have anymore Riverwalk pics right now though

I'm curious as to how you've become a Biscuits fan? Are you a transplanted local or perhaps a participant in the Air War College exchange program from Maxwell A.F.B.?

Anyway, welcome and enjoy.
Once again, thank you for the nice welcome.

How did I became a Biscuit fan? Well I am a baseball addict, play myself. I always followed Major League Baseball, but about two years ago I discovered Minor League baseball. Of course I knew it excisted, but I never visited a site before. Anyway, I roamed the site of MiLB and found the site of the Biscuits. I fell in love with their stadium, their uniform and especially their cap. Yellow is my favorite colour. And besides that, their name is whitty, not aggressive like the Warthhogs or names like that. I can get along quite well with Jim Tocco's mom. She is a Biscuit addict too. All these things together made me a Biscuit fan.
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  #1062  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2006, 7:33 PM
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Yankeebiscuitfan Yankeebiscuitfan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thoraudio
Welcome to the site! I replied to your PM... don't really have anymore Riverwalk pics right now though

I'm curious as to how you've become a Biscuits fan? Are you a transplanted local or perhaps a participant in the Air War College exchange program from Maxwell A.F.B.?

Anyway, welcome and enjoy.
Once again, thank you for the nice welcome.

How did I became a Biscuit fan? Well I am a baseball addict, play myself. I always followed Major League Baseball, but about two years ago I discovered Minor League baseball. Of course I knew it existed, but I never visited a site before. Anyway, I roamed the site of MiLB and found the site of the Biscuits. I fell in love with their stadium, their uniform and especially their cap. Yellow is my favorite colour. And besides that, their name is witty, not aggressive like the Warthogs or names like that. I can get along quite well with Jim Tocco's mom. She is a Biscuit addict too. All these things together made me a Biscuit fan.
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  #1063  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2006, 7:33 PM
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Yankeebiscuitfan Yankeebiscuitfan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thoraudio
Welcome to the site! I replied to your PM... don't really have anymore Riverwalk pics right now though

I'm curious as to how you've become a Biscuits fan? Are you a transplanted local or perhaps a participant in the Air War College exchange program from Maxwell A.F.B.?

Anyway, welcome and enjoy.
Once again, thank you for the nice welcome.

How did I became a Biscuit fan? Well I am a baseball addict, play myself. I always followed Major League Baseball, but about two years ago I discovered Minor League baseball. Of course I knew it existed, but I never visited a site before. Anyway, I roamed the site of MiLB and found the site of the Biscuits. I fell in love with their stadium, their uniform and especially their cap. Yellow is my favorite colour. And besides that, their name is witty, not aggressive like the Warthogs or names like that. I can get along quite well with Jim Tocco's mom. She is a Biscuit addict too. All these things together made me a Biscuit fan.
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  #1064  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2006, 7:40 PM
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Yankeebiscuitfan Yankeebiscuitfan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thoraudio
Welcome to the site! I replied to your PM... don't really have anymore Riverwalk pics right now though

I'm curious as to how you've become a Biscuits fan? Are you a transplanted local or perhaps a participant in the Air War College exchange program from Maxwell A.F.B.?

Anyway, welcome and enjoy.
Once again, thank you for the nice welcome.

How did I became a Biscuit fan? Well I am a baseball addict, play myself. I always followed Major League Baseball, but about two years ago I discovered Minor League baseball. Of course I knew it existed, but I never visited a site before. Anyway, I roamed the site of MiLB and found the site of the Biscuits. I fell in love with their stadium, their uniform and especially their cap. Yellow is my favorite colour. And besides that, their name is witty, not aggressive like the Warthogs or names like that. I can get along quite well with Jim Tocco's mom. She is a Biscuit addict too. All these things together made me a Biscuit fan.
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  #1065  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2006, 8:17 PM
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I think you just hit for the cycle
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  #1066  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2006, 9:12 PM
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Yankeebiscuitfan Yankeebiscuitfan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thoraudio
I think you just hit for the cycle
What on earth did I do???
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  #1067  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2006, 2:14 AM
Chad Emerson Chad Emerson is offline
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New Urban News article on Montgomery Area Smart Growth

I've posted a pdf of the recent feature story that New Urban News did on Montgomery Area smart growth happenings.

Just go to www.riverregionsmartgrowth.com and click on the 10.19.06 entry.

[sorry I couldn't paste it here but I don't know how to do that with a pdf]
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  #1068  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2006, 4:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad Emerson
I've posted a pdf of the recent feature story that New Urban News did on Montgomery Area smart growth happenings.

Just go to www.riverregionsmartgrowth.com and click on the 10.19.06 entry.

[sorry I couldn't paste it here but I don't know how to do that with a pdf]
Thanks, Chad. I read that article last week and found it very interesting. It's real exciting to see the interest around the nation about what Montgomery is doing for it's downtown.

Welcome aboard, Yankeebiscuitfan!
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  #1069  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2006, 6:07 PM
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Told you it was coming....

Seven area AmSouth branches will be sold to another financial institution in the coming weeks in order to satisfy federal bank regulators.

The deal was critical to getting federal approval for a proposed merger between AmSouth and its Birmingham neighbor, Regions.

To get past anti-trust laws, AmSouth made a deal with the U.S. Department of Justice to sell 52 branches, which ensures "that competition remains strong in certain areas where the companies are combining," the company said.

In Montgomery, branches at 5375 Atlanta Highway, 1465 East Blvd. and 2710 Taylor Road will be sold. Other area branches to be divested are at 3725 Alabama 14, Millbrook; 1882 East Main St., Prattville; 743 S. Main St., Wetumpka; and 9 Broad St., Selma.

According to Sonya Smith, a media relations representative at Regions, her bank will not be divesting any properties in the deal, but she refused to answer any other questions about the merger, which is set to close by November.

Bank officials maintain that service levels will remain the same after the new bank is formed. In the Montgomery area, the sale will affect about 60 employees.

"We are dedicated to selling these branches to companies that share our commitment to our associates, our customers, and our communities," Dowd Ritter, AmSouth's chairman, president and CEO, said in a statement. Ritter noted he hopes current employees will get job offers from the new owners.

The Federal Reserve approved the merger between AmSouth and Regions last week after AmSouth agreed to sell the branches, which had total deposits of $2.7 billion.

After the merger is completed, the total value of the merged bank would top $140 billion in assets and $100 billion in deposits. Stockholders in both banks voted for the deal this month.

Rick Swagler, a spokesman for AmSouth, said the bank is in final stage negotiations with a purchaser of the branches. Besides the physical assets of the branches, all the accounts of the customers also will be sold.

The merger will create a combined bank with 2,000 banking locations across 16 states. The deal will make Regions one of the top 10 bank holding companies in the United States.

Bank mergers also lead to consolidation of assets in certain areas and the new bank likely will close other branches after the merger is complete, said John Jahera, a professor of finance at Auburn University. The government just wants to prevent over-dominance in any one area, he said.

Story

This came from the Advertiser... I can only give info released to the press....
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  #1070  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2006, 8:57 PM
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Let's talk about some other developments around Montgomery since we have some new info about New Park and the area around Ray Thorington Road...particularly developments J,L, and I on the map below.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bystander1
Although there is lots of new construction going on in the city's more established neighborhoods, the outskirts of the city continue to grow seemingly without letup.

These are a few of the larger developments that I know of that will have 200 or more homes. I didn't list the ones that are 200 homes or less, they're many more of those.

As we learn the names or any other information of the known and unknown developments, please post them here.





A. Unknown development – PUD – plans submitted to planning commission
B. Unknown development – luxury apartments – plans submitted to planning commission
C. Community Village – mixed use development – plans submitted to planning commission
D. Unknown development – PUD – plans submitted to planning commission – turned down by city council; must make changes and resubmit plans for approval
E. Unknown development – PUD – plans submitted to planning commission
F. Unknown development – PUD – roads, sewers, sidewalks, and lakes are currently under construction
G. Taylor Lakes – PUD – under construction
H. Unknown development – PUD – plans submitted to planning commission
I. Hampstead – new urban development – plans submitted to planning commission
J. *Aronov property*no plans submitted as of yet
K. Ryan Ridge – PUD – under construction
L. Jim Wilson development – mixed use development – plans submitted to planning commission


October 23, 2006


Top developers converge in East Montgomery
By David Zaslawsky


MONTGOMERY – It is billed as the largest smart growth development in the area.

The area’s top developers, including Jim Wilson & Associates, Aronov, Lowder and Alfa are building projects for the massive 3,960-acre site, which is now being referred to as the Taylor Road/Ray Thorington corridor in Southeast Montgomery.

Once completed over a 15-year span, the project will feature 11,880 housing units with a projected population of 27,324.

“You have Aronov, Lowder, Alfa and Wilson -- the four biggest developers in the state all positioned right here – that ought to tell you something,” said Will Wilson, vice president of development for Jim Wilson & Associates.

The economic impact is as staggering as the project – ranging from a conservative estimate of $289 million to $667 million, according to a study by University of Alabama’s Arthur Allaway. The range reflects net new dollars at 25 percent and 50 percent.

The project is expected to attract affluent residents with an estimated one-third of the median household income between $80,000-$99,000 and another third at $120,000-$149,999. The remaining one-third is expected to comprise a median household income of $50,000-$69,999.

Those residents are expected to spend and spend and spend. Here are the annual projections:

$26.1 million on food to cook at home

$21.7 million on meals away from home

$39.9 million on furniture, electronics and appliances

$91.1 million on vehicles and transportation-related expenses

$39.9 million on health care and health care insurance

$36.8 million on pet products, hobbies and entertainment

$44.2 million on utilities, insurance, repairs and general household operations

$102 million on mortgage payments, interest and charges

$7 million on women’s and girls’ apparel and related services

$3.6 million on men’s and boys’ apparel and related services

Those figures are based on the 50 percent net new dollars and using that same formula, the estimated direct retails sales expenditures will top $250 million.

After four years, the development would be able to support a women’s clothing store and a men’s clothing store according to Allaway. Here are some other milestones the development can support:

By the end of year five: A supermarket and two-three restaurants

By the end of year seven: Two supermarkets, a drug store and two personal care stores

By the end of year 10: A new car dealership and a home center.

Although residents will spend hundreds of million dollars on retail sales, the development itself will have a limited amount of retail because the nearby area of Taylor and Vaughn roads is already booming with retail outlets.

Ken Groves, planner for the city of Montgomery, said the project will “have some office space and retail – like a little village.”
The largest segment of the project is Jim Wilson & Associates’ 1,429 acres – more than four times the size of their EastChase development. It is called New Park.

“It will be a full-service community,” said Kay Yarbrough, director of marketing and public relations for Jim Wilson & Associates. “It will encompass all age groups – multi-generational.”

“We are trying to make it a place where people want to be,” Will Wilson said. “We try to give it a sense of place and by putting Jim Wilson & Associates’ name on it, people know they will get quality. We will maintain the integrity of the development as my dad has done at Wynlakes or any of his commercial projects.”

What the projected 7,000-8,000 New Park residents won’t get is another Wynlakes. “We’re not going to build a golf course; we’re not going to have a country club,” Wilson said. “It will not be as upscale as Wynlakes.”

But it will be upscale. Wilson said the first phase would feature 700-800 units in the $200,000-$300,000 price range. He said homes in the second phase would range from $300,000-$750,000. There are also 100-foot lots available for million-dollar homes.

An important element of New Park is a new YMCA facility. “We gave the Y 15 acres and $1 million in cash so they could build a state-of-the-art YMCA out here,” Wilson said.

Wilson said his company has been working with school officials and said New Park has room for an elementary school and a junior high.
Tommy Tyson, land use controls administrator for the city of Montgomery, said Wilson’s project will have 300,000-plus square feet for retail use, which is the equivalent to the Wal-Mart-anchored Midtown Plaza in Montgomery. There is another 170,000 square feet of office space that is located next to the retail area. There is a site for a church adjacent to the office space, but Wilson said it may not be built.

Wilson said the retail segment could include a grocery store, pharmacy, bank, dry cleaners, hardware store and “a couple of nice restaurants – three-four at the max.”

“We really haven’t focused on the retail component – that will come later when we have enough houses built to support it,” Wilson said. “Then we will figure out what’s the best fit and what our needs are. Right now our main focus is on the subdivision and getting houses in there.”

The development will feature five neighborhoods and a combined 3,497 units, which includes apartments, lofts and might feature assisted and independent living.

Four ponds dot the project, totaling 100-plus acres and there is a 15-plus acre town center. Nearly 170 acres has been set aside for natural buffers and undisturbed wetlands – about half the size of EastChase.

Adjacent to New Park is the 416-acre Hampstead project being developed by Anna Lowder and Harvi Sahota. It will contain 1,800-plus residential units, 30-50 retail outlets, 8-10 restaurants, seven multi-use buildings and office space, according to Lowder, director of development for Hampstead, along with her husband Harvi Sahota. Hampstead is also planning a school, church and playfields.

The residential units will range from around $150,000 to $1 million-plus custom homes. Lowder said there will be luxury apartment homes and “standard apartments that are affordable.”

A 10-acre man-made lake forms the center of the development, which features three neighborhoods and each will contain civic buildings and public-gathering spaces. Two of those neighborhoods will have townhouses, single-family residences, apartments and lofts similar to ones developed by Lowder and Sahota in downtown Montgomery.

The town center facing Taylor Road will have the most commercial buildings, Lowder said, including three of the development’s restaurants. It will be constructed during Hampstead’s first phase. Construction is scheduled to begin in the spring.

Some of the buildings in the town center facing Taylor Road will include apartments and live-work units, where a small business owner works downstairs and lives upstairs. There will be a formal town square designed around the Hampstead Town Hall, a gathering spot for residents and visitors.

“The stores will be locally owned small businesses,” Lowder said. “We will have salons, art galleries, pet shops, banks, dry cleaners, hardware store, travel agent, mortgage corporation and hopefully doctor’s office, lawyer’s office – everything you need.”
She said businesses would range from about 500 square feet – a live-work unit – to about 1,200 square feet.

A second neighborhood center will wrap around the lake and the area will feature outdoor areas. Lowder said the third neighborhood would be a more rural setting.

Meanwhile, Michael “Mickey” Griffin, director of corporate services for Aronov, said his company is developing about 750 acres in the overall project and it might be an extension of its Deer Creek subdivision. But he said that Aronov might opt to “create a whole new environment.” The land is adjacent to the New Park development.

Griffin said the project could begin within a couple of years.

“It’s in flux now,” Griffin said. “Everything is determined by market conditions. It will be residential and there will be pockets of retail to support the residential. Any time you have a large group of rooftops in a certain area, you are going to need all types of commercial uses, civic uses and religious uses.”

Tyson said Aronov’s project will have 150,000-plus square feet of retail space. Griffin said he expects the development will have restaurants.

The development might also have office space, Griffin said. “We’ll have to see how that develops. The market dictates generally what happens on dirt.”

Meanwhile, Alfa’s project is an expansion of Sturbridge Plantation, which was originally 425 acres, but now encompasses 750 acres.
J. Mark Fain, real estate investment specialist for Alfa, said the company has “three-four years worth of vacant land to develop” before working on a 140-acre tract next to Hampstead that will have another 250-300 single-family homes.

When the project is completed, it will have 850-900 single-family homes in addition to the 360 multi-family units and offices at Sturbridge Commons as well as shopping at Sturbridge Village.
“Sturbridge is one of the first master-planned communities that incorporated a shopping component, a small office component and a multi-family component all into one plan,” Fain said.

The existing single-family homes at Sturbridge Plantation range from the upper $100,000-mid $400,000, Fain said.

“New homes on 100-foot lots range from $400,000-$650,000,” Fain said. He said there are 100-foot lots that back up to a recently developed lake.

“We do a lot of listening and watching the bigger players as different elements come out,” Fain said.

The Ida Belle Young estate owns about 200 acres adjacent to Alfa’s property and Fain said the company “looks at most any land in East Montgomery.”

After the nearly 4,000-acre project is completed, Tyson said an additional 1,000-1,500 acres around the area would be developed “probably 20 years from now.”

David Zaslawsky is editor of the Central Alabama Business Journal. You can call him at (334) 230-2225 or e-mail at cabj@cabj.biz
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  #1071  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2006, 7:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bystander1
Thanks, Chad. I read that article last week and found it very interesting. It's real exciting to see the interest around the nation about what Montgomery is doing for it's downtown.

Welcome aboard, Yankeebiscuitfan!
Thank you bystander1.

I sent a link to a forum member of Biscuitsfans.com. He told me that the development of downtown Montgomery is really necessary. He told me that the area was alive during office hours, but dormant at night. So even though I still think that the modern buildings fit in the old part of down town, I realize that it is a good thing that the city of Montgomery is doing for it's town center.
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  #1072  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 2:02 AM
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Did y'all notice the "For Sale" signs on the Colonial Bank Bldgs on Commerce Street?
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  #1073  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 3:11 PM
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The main colonial building has been for sale as condo's for a while now.. There aren't any others on commerce street.

Are you talking about One Court Square?
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  #1074  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 4:27 PM
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No. The buildings I am talking about are the old Amsouth building on Commerce. It is black marble and nestled between the old FirstAlabama building and the old Union Bank building. The other building is the old Colonial Bank drive through teller building next to the empy lot that used to be the Frank Leu building.
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  #1075  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 8:18 PM
Chad Emerson Chad Emerson is offline
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That drive thru Colonial bank (and especially the adjoing surface parking lot) are very important pieces to the downtown redevelopment puzzle.

I sure hope that they end up in good hands.
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  #1076  
Old Posted Oct 28, 2006, 9:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chad Emerson
That drive thru Colonial bank (and especially the adjoing surface parking lot) are very important pieces to the downtown redevelopment puzzle.

I sure hope that they end up in good hands.
I agree. The new tallest [whenever that might be] NEEDS to go there.
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  #1077  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2006, 1:46 AM
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Actually, I think that site needs a 10-12 story building.

If Montgomery were to ever get a new tallest, it should go on the block between the RSA tower and City Hall, where the horrible Madison Hotel (or whatever they're calling it now) is located.
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  #1078  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2006, 2:56 AM
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I agree with Chad. It is a very important piece of the downtown puzzle.

Unfortunately, if it wasn't for the stupid decision of Colonial Bank to take a major part in urban sprawl, we would be looking at a 16-story building on that site today.
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  #1079  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2006, 3:48 AM
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I'm going to buy it and build an exact replica of the Leu building.



BTW, my understanding is that the lot in question is basically at 'make offer and proposal' price.
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  #1080  
Old Posted Oct 29, 2006, 4:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thoraudio
I'm going to buy it and build an exact replica of the Leu building.
Please don't use wood floors this time. It's my understand that part of the reason why they had to implode it was because most of the guts of the building were made out of wood and there were whole floors missing. How about an similar but modern construction materials replica of the Frank Leu?
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