HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum

Since 1999, the SkyscraperPage Forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web. The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics. Welcome!

You are currently browsing as a guest. Register with the SkyscraperPage Forum and join this growing community of skyscraper enthusiasts. Registering has benefits such as fewer ads, the ability to post messages, private messaging and more.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #41  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2006, 7:17 AM
dtsd dtsd is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMich
It just shows how much Bob Grooters believes in the the city. That, or he realizes how underserved downtown Grand Rapids is for this type of housing, or how he can lock down the market for a few years by saturating the market.
Downtown Grand Rapids is terribly underserved and GR's timid, risk-averse developers have (mostly) sat on the sidelines for the past 6+ years, missing out on the single largest nationwide downtown-condo building boom we've ever seen. Now that the party is coming to a close we finally see GR developers test the waters in a significant way. Unreal.

What Grooters is finally doing looks great, but what a missed opportunity! This should have been built years ago with at least a couple similar-sized projects to follow.

Last edited by dtsd; Sep 11, 2006 at 7:31 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #42  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2006, 4:57 PM
-GR2NY-'s Avatar
-GR2NY- -GR2NY- is offline
RePpiN GR sTreeTz !
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Grand Rapids
Posts: 3,388
__________________
-Grand Rapids Metro, 1.4 Million strong.

-FerrariEnzo is the coolest forumer ever.

[>>]-Grand Rapids Boom Rundown-[<<]
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #43  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 8:44 AM
Btown Btown is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 42
not much of a boom..... but the stuff that is going up looks ok.....
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #44  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 10:16 PM
Wheelingman04's Avatar
Wheelingman04 Wheelingman04 is offline
Pittsburgh rocks!!
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Salem, OH (near Youngstown)
Posts: 8,706
Looks like a great medium-sized city.
__________________
1 hour from Pittsburgh and 1 hour from Cleveland
Go PITT Panthers!!
Ohio Proud!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #45  
Old Posted Dec 17, 2006, 12:34 AM
Michi's Avatar
Michi Michi is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Downtown Houston
Posts: 8,441
Quote:
Originally Posted by Btown View Post
not much of a boom..... but the stuff that is going up looks ok.....
Well, I'm not sure about you, but I'd say excess of $1 billion dollars in investment (in a given period (now)) in any downtown is considered a boom. Especially in a city of 200,000.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #46  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2006, 4:05 PM
-GR2NY-'s Avatar
-GR2NY- -GR2NY- is offline
RePpiN GR sTreeTz !
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Grand Rapids
Posts: 3,388
^ Exactly. Theres over 1 billion on michigan street alone. So cool to live just a couple hundred feet from all that, watching things rise daily. If I didn't live on the hillside, then I wouldn't live in grand rapids.

Kind of off topic, but this is going up in New York, called the Avery. Look familiar?

__________________
-Grand Rapids Metro, 1.4 Million strong.

-FerrariEnzo is the coolest forumer ever.

[>>]-Grand Rapids Boom Rundown-[<<]
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #47  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2006, 9:34 PM
dtsd dtsd is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michi View Post
Well, I'm not sure about you, but I'd say excess of $1 billion dollars in investment in any downtown is considered a boom.
$1 billion is nothing to sneeze at, but in major US cities that's not considered a boom; and considering the (unfortunate) general lack of high rises going up, it's hard to think of it as a boom in GR either.

It really is a shame GR developers have been so timid while urban developers in so many cities across the country rode the national urban housing boom, putting up condo tower after condo tower - and raked in the dough. Maybe next upswing GR's won't be so hesitant.

Last edited by dtsd; Dec 27, 2006 at 9:56 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #48  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2006, 11:51 PM
LMich's Avatar
LMich LMich is online now
Midwest Moderator - Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Big Mitten
Posts: 29,997
What major U.S. cities are you talking about? I hope you're not going to be comparing GR to cities many times its size. It's kind of ridiculous, too, to judge a cities boom off of how many high-rise residential towers it puts up. If you're going to make a comparison about downtown residential development, at least make it along the lines of solid, meaningful stats such as number of housing units constructed over a time period, or the monetary worth of the number of projects.
__________________
Where the trees are the right height
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #49  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2006, 6:27 PM
dtsd dtsd is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 66
Please note I was disputing the claim that $1 billion dollars is considered a boom in any downtown. I’m not interested in getting into a semantical debate; obviously Grand Rapids is a smaller city. I will say that it’s disappointing that even with $1B, there are only a couple towers that are changing the skyline in a meaningful way.

Obviously a boom can impact any sector; the reason for the emphasis on residential is two fold: 1) the secret to a downtown that’s vibrant day and night is having people living there, and 2) the residential boom is what GR’s urban developers largely missed.

Urban developers all over have taken full advantage of two trends in recent years: 1) the return to the urban core, and 2) the national real estate boom. Yet GR’s timid developers seem to have missed the boat. If they rode the convergence of these two trends from the beginning (as others did), Grand Rapids could have easily put up several additional condo towers.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #50  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2006, 9:22 PM
LMich's Avatar
LMich LMich is online now
Midwest Moderator - Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Big Mitten
Posts: 29,997
Are you aware that there is quite a residential renaissance occuring in the form of large-scale historic renovations? I seriously want to see your proof that developers aren't taking hold of the downtown living end of this. The fact that new-construction condo towers aren't going up all around is a pretty poor example of proof. If you do want to talk condo towers, though, show me another city the size of Grand Rapids that's currently putting up a nearly 400' condo tower (i.e. RiverHouse).
__________________
Where the trees are the right height
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2006, 11:03 PM
dtsd dtsd is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 66
Yes, and all of that is terrific progress. RiverHouse is also great; unfortunately that’s the only new condo tower of significant height. The problem is that they got such a late start on it all. Construction on RiverHouse could have and should have started years ago.

And by the way Grooters is one of the more bold thinkers in GR development. It's not surprising at all that he's the one putting up the single tall condo building. Most of the rest of the local developers are so damn small minded.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #52  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2006, 12:02 AM
LMich's Avatar
LMich LMich is online now
Midwest Moderator - Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Big Mitten
Posts: 29,997
Where are you from, BTW, and where do you currently live? It would better help frame the discussion.
__________________
Where the trees are the right height
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #53  
Old Posted Dec 30, 2006, 10:14 AM
dtsd dtsd is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 66
I spent 21 years in Grand Rapids and think of it as home, thus my hope and expectation of higher standards. I can't compare to other small cities because I don't follow them, however I can and do extrapolate from the successes of major cities. I moved to southern California for the weather many years ago and love it, and am still cheering for GR. It has so much potential.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #54  
Old Posted Dec 30, 2006, 10:46 AM
LMich's Avatar
LMich LMich is online now
Midwest Moderator - Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Big Mitten
Posts: 29,997
Sorry, you can't do that here. We can't have these interboard wards, so please edit your post. I completey understand your frustration, but this can't be allowed, here.

*It appears that you haven't got back since my post, so I deleted your post for you.*
__________________
Where the trees are the right height

Last edited by LMich; Dec 31, 2006 at 1:37 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #55  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 10:37 PM
DLLB DLLB is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Penticton, BC
Posts: 2,195
Very nice pictures. The shots from the air remind me a bit of Winnipeg because of all the trees.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #56  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 11:31 PM
twomutts twomutts is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Ann Arbor
Posts: 55
I drove through GR over the weekend, and the Marriott is a really nice addition. Is construction on River House actually under way? Anyone have any pics of the new skyline?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #57  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2007, 9:04 AM
LMich's Avatar
LMich LMich is online now
Midwest Moderator - Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Big Mitten
Posts: 29,997
River House is well under construction.

The new skyline courtesy of Powerbrooktrance (http://www.flickr.com/photos/powerbooktrance/)





River House


Sparky05 - http://www.flickr.com/photos/sparkys_joint/
__________________
Where the trees are the right height

Last edited by LMich; Jan 17, 2007 at 9:10 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #58  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2007, 10:26 PM
twomutts twomutts is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Ann Arbor
Posts: 55
Looking good! The city really needs to start building upwards a little east from the river. A couple of 40+ stories towers would REALLY make the skyline impressive. As it is, I can't wait to see what it looks like once River House is finally done. I remember 10 years ago they were talking about making the "twin" to Bridgewater Place. It's about time they actually DID something!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #59  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2007, 3:19 AM
Michi's Avatar
Michi Michi is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Downtown Houston
Posts: 8,441
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtsd View Post
$1 billion is nothing to sneeze at, but in major US cities that's not considered a boom; and considering the (unfortunate) general lack of high rises going up, it's hard to think of it as a boom in GR either.

It really is a shame GR developers have been so timid while urban developers in so many cities across the country rode the national urban housing boom, putting up condo tower after condo tower - and raked in the dough. Maybe next upswing GR's won't be so hesitant.
We're talking about Michigan here where the status quo is to let cities rot. A dollars investment in a city is considered a boom here. Needless to say, $1 billion being spent in any single downtown anywhere, I would consider a boom of some sort, especially in a city as small as Grand Rapids. This is just one period. There will be more in the future both larger and smaller than this incriment.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #60  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2007, 3:10 AM
Michi's Avatar
Michi Michi is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Downtown Houston
Posts: 8,441
GO GR GO!!

GR’s proposed $69M streetcar system could spur billions in redevelopment

If development along the proposed streetcar system in downtown Grand Rapids follows the patterns of other metro areas, the city’s current multi-billion dollar building boom could be just the beginning. The successful reintroduction of a streetcar in Portland, Oregon is a case in point.

Since Portland announced its downtown streetcar line in 1997, developers have been busy constructing new buildings and expanding old ones along the route. Today the city enjoys 126 percent more office, retail, residential, and institutional space within just three blocks of the streetcar line. In fact, 55 percent of all downtown development in the city's central business district during the last decade has occured within one block of the streetcar.

The now 4.8 mile streetcar route has cost Portland about $55 million to-date, but the project has helped leverage nearly $3 billion in urban redevelopment investment. And property values have jumped as much as 40 percent near the transit line.

“We’re looking at a new streetcar line for downtown,” said Roland Chlapowski, Portland City Commissioner Sam Adams’ liaison to the office of transportation. “One of the biggest landowners said they’d invest $200 million of development in the area [if we proceed]. And that’s just one landowner.”


The proposed Grand Rapids streetcar route would run nearly 2.5 miles from The Rapid Central Station at 250 Grandville, north along Monroe Avenue to Sixth Street, with six cars running at five-minute intervals.

Based on Portland’s experience, the result for Grand Rapids could be a significant increase in development and in foot traffic from businesses, residences, and educational facilities within about four blocks of the route. Major activity centers such as River House Condominiums, Van Andel Arena, Grand Rapids Art Museum, Monroe Center, the JW Marriott, and DeVos Place would not only be destinations for passengers, they would provide passengers, as well.

The route would also connect the Grandville Avenue, Heartside, Creston, and potentially, Belknap Lookout neighborhoods.

Local leaders Bing Goei, chairman of the Grand Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce, Rick Chapla of The Right Place, Inc., former Mayor John Logie, and others recently visited Portland to get a firsthand view of that city’s streetcar system and the resulting development. A second, larger group of local leaders is planning to visit again this year.

On January 24, The Rapid Board of Commissioners voted to accelerate the study and design of the proposed streetcar system.

Source: Roland Chlapowski, City of Portland; Great Transit Grand Tomorrows Advisory Committee January 10 meeting presentation; Andy Guy, Michigan Land Use Institute
www.ridetherapid.org
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
   
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:18 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.