HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #2401  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 4:36 AM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is online now
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 22,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Anyone happens to have more pics of the area around that Morse's Teas buildings? If I recall correctly, it's one of the nicest parts of Old Halifax IMO. (Keep in mind I've never been there, going only from memory of the few pics I've seen on this forum.)
I've got a few photos (older and unfortunately not great quality):

__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2402  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 5:52 AM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Colebrook, NH (as well as QC & FL)
Posts: 26,178
Looks fantastic. The first pic is exactly what I recalled and expected to see... I was pretty sure I remembered a cluster of buildings that shared materials and style with this Morse's Teas building (which was alone in that recently-posted pic).

(Even though, obviously, having traded its original roof style for two extra stories is a significant architectural change...)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2403  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2014, 10:14 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is online now
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 22,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
(Even though, obviously, having traded its original roof style for two extra stories is a significant architectural change...)
The darker stone is called ironstone. I think it is just the pyritic slate that's under this part of town. It was used a lot prior to about 1850, although a lot of older buildings have only ironstone firewalls or foundations and sandstone fronts. Dalhousie also has a bunch of buildings built with ironstone around 1900, probably in an attempt to make them look older. Wallace stone (from Northern NS) was considered nicer so as time went on more and more buildings were built out of sandstone quarried there.

The brick top of Morse's Teas was added in the early 1900's and the base is from circa 1840.

Keith's Brewery (1820) is another nice ironstone building:



Keith Hall, next to the brewery, is in the process of being restored and it will probably be wonderful when complete.

The Cavalier building in the Citadel courtyard is another great one.

As you can probably tell I really like these buildings (much more so than the office towers there, which I don't think are actually that interesting or exceptional).
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2404  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2014, 10:41 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Colebrook, NH (as well as QC & FL)
Posts: 26,178
WOW! I knew it said "established 1820" on the labels, but I had no idea they were still in their original building!!!

From now on I won't ever be buying any beer except Alexander Keith's when I'm in Canada, knowing that part of my money is going to serve for the upkeep of that gorgeous nearly bicentenarian building. (I'm not much of a beer drinker, while I'm a huge fan of architectural heritage, so they have got my loyalty from now on!)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2405  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2014, 10:43 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Colebrook, NH (as well as QC & FL)
Posts: 26,178
I too think Halifax's newer office towers are generally bland and nondescript, but at least it means the (sober) colors and materials tend to blend well with the heritage buildings.

I can't exactly put my finger on why, but your home town (I think it is... right?) pulls off mixing old and new very well, and I'm guessing that the fact the "new" isn't "in your face" but is instead reserved and bland might be part of it.


Edit: and thanks a lot for the ironstone info and background info on these buildings, and the extra pics!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2406  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2014, 12:42 AM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is online now
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 22,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
I can't exactly put my finger on why, but your home town (I think it is... right?) pulls off mixing old and new very well, and I'm guessing that the fact the "new" isn't "in your face" but is instead reserved and bland might be part of it.
The city also probably wouldn't work well without new buildings. It is too large/remote to be an exclusive tourist town, and a lot of people like it specifically because it's a real city.

The new buildings are also getting better and better over time. They were awful in the 90's, okay last decade, and now a bunch of the new ones are actually quite good.

I guess I could describe Halifax as my hometown, although I've lived in and grew up in a few different cities across Canada. I think I continue to like it and post about it now more because it's an interesting place (that typically tends to be somewhat forgotten about, or presented in a superficial fashion) than because I happened to live there for a long time. I definitely don't care for some of the crappy suburbs I lived in outside of Halifax.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2407  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2014, 10:42 AM
GlassCity's Avatar
GlassCity GlassCity is offline
As seen in Winnipeg
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Lower Mainland
Posts: 5,160
Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
The city also probably wouldn't work well without new buildings. It is too large/remote to be an exclusive tourist town, and a lot of people like it specifically because it's a real city.

The new buildings are also getting better and better over time. They were awful in the 90's, okay last decade, and now a bunch of the new ones are actually quite good.

I guess I could describe Halifax as my hometown, although I've lived in and grew up in a few different cities across Canada. I think I continue to like it and post about it now more because it's an interesting place (that typically tends to be somewhat forgotten about, or presented in a superficial fashion) than because I happened to live there for a long time. I definitely don't care for some of the crappy suburbs I lived in outside of Halifax.
Vancouver's much bigger than Halifax and it still manages to be a tourist town
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2408  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2014, 4:24 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Colebrook, NH (as well as QC & FL)
Posts: 26,178
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlassCity View Post
Vancouver's much bigger than Halifax and it still manages to be a tourist town
Don't be silly -- he said exclusive tourist town. Meaning that it would rely mostly on its looks to do so. St. Augustine, FL, or Carcassonne, France, come to mind (they're both more extreme example than a homogeneous, historic, perfectly preserved Halifax would likely be, but you get the point).

Paris, London, NYC, Tokyo are major "tourist towns" and are all much bigger than Vancouver, but they're FAR from relying only on tourism to exist.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2409  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2014, 4:32 PM
FrAnKs's Avatar
FrAnKs FrAnKs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ville de Québec / Quebec city
Posts: 5,101
__________________
PROVINCE OF QUEBEC ==> 8 500 000
MONTREAL METRO ==> 4 250 000
QUEBEC CITY METRO ==> 825 000
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2410  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2014, 4:53 PM
Nouvellecosse's Avatar
Nouvellecosse Nouvellecosse is online now
Volatile Pacivist
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 6,055
^^ I love the historic train station, but what the hell is that monstrosity behind it?
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2411  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2014, 5:30 PM
FrAnKs's Avatar
FrAnKs FrAnKs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ville de Québec / Quebec city
Posts: 5,101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
^^ I love the historic train station, but what the hell is that monstrosity behind it?
It has mixed uses.

The ground floor is used as a terminal for buses (Orléans express, greyhound etc...), it's actually connected to the old part of the train station. The other floors are used by the Société de l'assurance automobile du Québec (SAAQ).

Though, even if it's not beautiful, I think I've seen much worst.

They did an extension behind the 80's one, and it looks better.

https://maps.google.ca/maps?q=ville+...5.09,,0,-16.98

But it's true that the architectural difference is brutal compared to the historic part.

There's actually a pretty nice tunnel Under :
(Joseph Samson tunnel)
https://maps.google.ca/maps?q=ville+...2.24,,0,-10.78
https://maps.google.ca/maps?q=ville+...49.68,,0,-9.75
__________________
PROVINCE OF QUEBEC ==> 8 500 000
MONTREAL METRO ==> 4 250 000
QUEBEC CITY METRO ==> 825 000

Last edited by FrAnKs; Jan 19, 2014 at 5:50 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2412  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2014, 7:33 PM
c@taract_soulj@h's Avatar
c@taract_soulj@h c@taract_soulj@h is offline
"Pow! Right in the kissa"
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Welland, ON
Posts: 577
Brantford, ON, Pop. 94,000

Almost looks better than Kitcheners lol...jk



Courtesy of Google
__________________
Fawdie (n): Forty ounces of urine-flavored beer
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2413  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2014, 9:03 PM
Nouvellecosse's Avatar
Nouvellecosse Nouvellecosse is online now
Volatile Pacivist
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 6,055
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrAnKs View Post
...
Though, even if it's not beautiful, I think I've seen much worst.

They did an extension behind the 80's one, and it looks better.
...

But it's true that the architectural difference is brutal compared to the historic part.
...
Yes, if it was in a suburban office park or at least a few km outside the central city I'm sure it would be fine. It would still be a dull, non-descript, pomo hulk, but that's nothing unusual for contemporary NA.
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2414  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2014, 9:11 PM
vid's Avatar
vid vid is offline
Editor
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Thunder Bay
Posts: 40,444
That's not post-modernism, that's modernism or brutalism depending on the material. If it was a terrible copy of the train station with horrible proportions and half-assed details, thne it would be post-modernism.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2415  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2014, 9:45 PM
Nouvellecosse's Avatar
Nouvellecosse Nouvellecosse is online now
Volatile Pacivist
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 6,055
I'm afraid I don't agree. Remember that both Pomo and Brutalism are offshoots of modernism and basically represent the slow drift away away from the strict principles modernism. In Pomo's case it was a drift back into the realm of ornamentation, and in Brutalism's case it was a drift away from Modernism's lightness and open-ness to allow for the use of heavy concrete as a lower cost material.

Pomo doesn't have any strict visual cues found in other architectural styles (since it's such a far reaching style that it really isn't a "style" so much as it's a design category). It's somewhat of a cliché that Pomo is characterised by the often vulgar retro-references that appear later in the movement. Earlier versions are basically modernism that just happens to not adhere as strictly to the simplicity and form-follows-function mantra of original Modernism. Buildings like Scotia Plaza, and the famous Bank of China building in HK (designed by I.M. Pei) are both categorized as Pomo.

In this building's case, it's mainly Modern, but the massing, shape, glass pyramid on the podium, etc. do not adhere strictly enough to true modernism.

Take a look at some of the examples of Pomo. Some you may find surprising. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categor...re_by_location
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw

Last edited by Nouvellecosse; Jan 20, 2014 at 12:12 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2416  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2014, 6:13 AM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cold Garden
Posts: 20,521
Fort McMurray

__________________
Strong & free

'My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.' — Jack Layton
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2417  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2014, 1:26 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is online now
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 28,439
It doesn't look as far north as it is.
__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2418  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2014, 1:34 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is online now
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 28,439
Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador



City Hall



School of Fine Arts

__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2419  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2014, 11:07 PM
Tone's Avatar
Tone Tone is offline
Riki beach
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Rimouski, Qc
Posts: 2,984
Wish I made it to Corner Brook when I was in NFLD!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2420  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2014, 11:20 PM
Tone's Avatar
Tone Tone is offline
Riki beach
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Rimouski, Qc
Posts: 2,984
Rimouski's ice fishing village on the St. Lawrence
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:41 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.