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Old Posted Nov 23, 2010, 8:27 PM
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Alabama State University Development News

Great read if you would like to know what's going on at ASU.





Vision 2020 - The Transformation of Alabama State University
ASU Today Magazine



Click here for link.

Last edited by Thedarkone1977; Dec 9, 2010 at 10:10 PM.
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Old Posted Nov 23, 2010, 9:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Thedarkone1977 View Post
Great read if you would like to know what's going on at ASU.


Vision 2020 - The Transformation of Alabama State University
ASU Today Magazine

http://tcuconsulting.com/projects/AS...y-Nov_2009.pdf
Your link does not appear to work. Besides, it looks like the document was a year old anyway...
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Old Posted Nov 23, 2010, 9:33 PM
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Just read the article that was posted in the MGM Development thread. Great news about the stadium.

I'm also glad to read that the university wants to increase their presence in downtown. With both the downtown aspect and the stadium, I think the school is well on its way to improving its image and quality of education.

Maybe we'll see another UAB spout out of this. Montgomery has been long overdue for a major research institution. I'd say it's probably the only one out of the Big 4 that doesn't have a large research sector, and think that ASU can fill that void.

Just imagine what the advent of a school like UA, AU, UAB, USA, or UAH (I mention UA Huntsville because of its strong ties to the defense/research sectors within Huntsville) could do for the river region, AS WELL as the immediate Black Belt areas surrounding the city.

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Old Posted Nov 23, 2010, 10:58 PM
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I don't know if this is the official companion video for the Vision 2020 (The Transformation of Alabama State University) article but it should be.

Great Video!!!!!!!!


ASU Transformation Video
By: Video Production Unlimited



Click here for link.

Last edited by Thedarkone1977; Dec 9, 2010 at 10:09 PM.
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Old Posted Nov 23, 2010, 11:01 PM
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Originally Posted by OCA REP View Post
Your link does not appear to work.
Sorry about that, I edited the link and it should work now.
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Old Posted Nov 23, 2010, 11:05 PM
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This is a old article but it appears ASU is still doing what the article said.


Alabama State Pushing to be First HBCU in NCAA Division I-A
Black Issues in Higher Education, June 8, 2000 by Linda Meggett Brown



MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- The Alabama State University Board of Trustees here has decided to push forward efforts to become the first historically Black institution to move to Division I-A football despite concern and skepticism among some university officials.

The board voted last month to make the switch from Division I-AA, and then immediately filed a declaration of intent with the National Collegiate Athletics Association. A letter was sent May 15 to NCAA President Cedric Dempsey stating the university's intent to initiate the process.

Retiring university president Dr. William Harris said in a written statement, "This step by Alabama State University is a significant and historic one, which will be a test for all parties involved."

The proposal, developed by the trustees' athletic committee, calls for the construction of a 40,000-seat state-of-the-art football stadium and field house, and the development of the National Black Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. The price tag -- $92 million -- calls for $60 million for the stadium complex, $15 million for the museum and $17 million for operating reserve funds.

But what most dissenters are really concerned about are the funds needed to maintain Division I-A status.

The trustees voted 8-2 to make the move. Board members Joe Reed and Lanny Vines cast the opposing votes. Both have been longtime opponents of the move to the larger division. They expressed concerns about the university's financial obligation to the project and the school's ability to fulfill the NCAA's minimum requirement of selling at least 17,000 tickets to home games.

In 1998, regular home-game attendance averaged 11,500. But the average goes up to 20,000 if the football classics in which Alabama State is considered the home team are included. In 1999, the average attendance for the five regular home games was 13,428. When the classics were figured in, the average jumped to 18,886.

"ASU will have some economic risk, and I think it's substantial," Vines says. "Without ticket sales, I would say ASU is in a heap of financial trouble."

Vines unsuccessfully tried to amend the motion with a provision that the move to Division I-A would have no economic impact on the university's general operating budget.

The board did agree that Division I-A contracts must have its approval.

Reed has said publicly that the school shouldn't make the move because it's hardly competitive for Division I-AA. The Hornets were 2-9 last season.

Former football coach Ron Dickerson was fired late last year for telling school officials that Alabama State isn't ready to move up to Division I-A. Dickerson has been replaced with L.C. Cole, but officials continue to search for a replacement for athletic director Curtis Williams, who resigned Jan. 31.

Donald Watkins, who chaired the board's athletic committee, says the university will finance the project through the sale of naming rights on the football stadium complex and museum.

"We will get the money in hand first -- all of it -- before we spend a dime," he says.

Jim White, of Porter, White & Co. Inc., an investment banking firm based in Birmingham, Ala., that consulted with the athletics committee, says the potential benefits to moving to Division I-A are very large and the risks are very small.

"When we took the probability of success and multiplied it by the benefits and adjusted for the risks, we recommended the approval of the proposal," he says. "We believe there is a good chance the financing can be raised."

White adds that his firm estimated the cost of operating the program at $5 million while the projected revenues that will come with Division I-A status are $11 million.

Board chairwoman Catherine Wright says the vote shows the institution is willing to take steps to move the university forward.

"It's an opportunity that every Black person can be proud of," she says.

Now that university officials have filed a declaration of intent, the university will have a two-year reclassification period to meet the applicable legislation, according to Jane Jankowski, NCAA spokesman.

During that time, the university will have to meet compliance in three main areas -- scheduling requirements, attendance and scholarships.

To meet the scheduling requirements, at least 60 percent of the university's football games must be against Division I-A schools. The attendance must have averaged 17,000 in paid tickets for home games during the immediate past four years, or it must have a stadium with a 30,000 seating capacity, plus a 17,000 average attendance for home games for at least one of the last four years. Football scholarships must total 85.

If the requirements are met, the school will be reclassified to Division I-A. If they don't meet the minimum attendance, they can have four years to fix that, Jankowski says.

There are about 122 Division I-AA schools and about 114 Division I-A schools.

Meanwhile, the board finds itself grappling with a replacement for Harris, who announced in April that he would resign from his job at the end of the academic year. He has said he will stay until his successor is appointed to ensure a smooth transition.
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Old Posted Nov 23, 2010, 11:11 PM
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I'm proud of ASU.


Alabama State expands its footprint
By Markeshia Ricks • Montgomery Advertiser • November 24, 2010








Alabama State University, the largest four-year university in Montgomery, is about to get bigger.

The university, which has embarked on a more than $120 million campus construction campaign, expects to break ground on a 30,000-seat stadium within six weeks and is in the process of acquiring a building at 38 Commerce St., across the street from the Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce.

ASU President William H. Harris announced during a Tuesday business and commu­nity breakfast held at the Mont­gomery Renaissance Hotel & Spa at the Convention Center that a bond issue to finance the stadium project had been ap­proved and that the university would acquire the building on Commerce Street.

"We should have shovels in the ground in the next six weeks," he told an audience of enthusiastic ASU supporters who gathered at the breakfast as part of university's homecom­ing festivities this week.

The proposed ASU stadium project is a 30,000-seat, mixed-use stadium that will occupy a space that abuts Interstate 85 and Hall Street.

Harris said although having its own stadium has been a long-held dream for the university, it has been seriously working on the plans for the stadium for about a year-and-a-half. He said it was important to move for­ward with the stadium now as part of an overall effort to trans­form the campus.

Last fall Harris unveiled Vi­sion 2020, a strategic plan for the university to modernize the campus over the next five years. ASU is poised to complete a new 32,000-square-foot, football com­plex, which includes a practice field and academic facilities, sometime in February. A base­ball field, softball field and soc­cer field/intramural complex are expected to be finished in January, April and August, re­spectively. Other ASU construc­tion projects include a library, student housing and a new stu­dent center.

But the stadium, which will have premium seating and cor­porate skyboxes, is expected to be a crown jewel in the universi­ty's plans. The proposed budget for the stadium is about $50 mil­lion, and Harris said Tuesday that construction should be complete in time for the 2012 Turkey Day Classic to be played at the new stadium.

ASU Athletic Director Stacy Danley said an on-campus stadi­um will go a long way in recruit­ing and retaining top football coaches and players. ASU's foot­ball team currently plays at Cramton Bowl. Danley said the new stadium would not be ready for the start of the 2012-football season, but definitely in time for the annual Turkey Day Classic, which brings thousands to cam­pus each year.

Harris said the university is not looking for outside help to get the stadium built because the project will be financed with bonds. But the university plans to reach out to alumni and mu­nicipal partners to help pay off the debt. He also said that there is a possibility that the naming rights for the stadium could be sold. He said tuition would not be raised to pay for the stadium.

Harris also announced the school will be adding the build­ing on Commerce Street. The building's last owner of record was Colonial Bank, and the last appraised value of the building was just over $1.3 million. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. took over the property fol­lowing Colonial Bank's failure last year.

John Stanley & Associates handled the sale of the building, but Stanley declined to say who currently owns the building. He also is not involved with the ne­gotiations between the new owner and ASU.

Harris said the building would be a gift to the university from a donor whose name he also could not disclose. Harris did say that one possible use for the building could be as a new home for the university's Col­lege of Business Administra­tion.

"We're part of the business leadership in Montgomery," he said of the importance of a pres­ence downtown.

Montgomery County Com­mission Chairman Elton Dean, who also is chairman of the ASU Board of Trustees, praised the university for the investment it has made in the city. He said the university is a vital part of the community and the region.

"I pledge through the County Commission that we will contin­ue to do all the things that we need to do to make ASU success­ful," he said.

Mayor Todd Strange called ASU an economic engine and part of the region's push for eco­nomic development. He said the city and the county are all about economic development, and ASU is apart of that focus.

"It's a wonderful time to be a Hornet," Strange said.

Last edited by Thedarkone1977; Mar 25, 2011 at 2:01 PM.
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Old Posted Nov 24, 2010, 11:09 PM
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ALABAMA STATE UNIVERSITY CREATES NEW INSTITUTION FROM THE INSIDE OUT
Montgomery Business Journal
November/December 2010
by David Zaslawsky






Yet as significant as those changes are, and coupled with a conservative economic impact of $1.8 billion (three times the amount of spending), ASU is also undergoing a transformational change on the inside. That’s something that may have gone unnoticed because of the headline-stealing news of one new multi-million-dollar building after another.

Those changes started with “enhancing the quality of students,” as ASU President Williams H. Harris said, by modifying the admissions’ policies. The university last year launched a counseling program and is developing new programs such as robotics and orthotics. The latter refers to dealing with people who have severe injuries and special needs – what you see from soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The university is developing forensic sciences programs at both the undergraduate and master’s levels, and Harris said a goal is to double the number of doctoral programs. Currently there are three: physical therapy, educational leadership policy and law and microbiology.

Harris said the university “was founded and established mostly” as a university to prepare teachers. “We must continue to do that, but at the same time we must embrace the idea that we need to be involved in expanding the range of opportunities. We must embrace and learn new fields as they develop … We have to concentrate with degrees that focus on research. We have to focus on degrees that cause people to deal with new knowledge that we have not dealt with in the past.”

One key area of concentration is on entrepreneurship, which impacts not only students in the College of Business Administration, but students in other colleges as well. As Harris pointed out, a student majoring in physical therapy may end up owning their own business and need to learn entrepreneurial skills.

“We need to show folks that they can get an absolutely first-rate education at ASU,” Harris said. “We don’t have a theme, but need to ask people why leave home when you can do it more cheaply and as competitively as you can at some other place.

“In order to have first-rate programs you’ve got to have good facilities – people have to feel good about where they are. That goes from our student housing to our classrooms and laboratories. We need to be able to say to people the way you live and work at ASU is equivalent to the way you live and work at any other top-rated university in the country, and that’s our goal.”

To reach that goal, ASU is creating a town for 8,000-plus residents that happens to have a 30,000-seat football stadium. The undertaking is so massive that there are nine general contractors currently working on various projects. Harris probably needs a calculator to count the number of construction workers on campus.

“We are well over 5,700 students for this semester so the growth has begun for us, and we are absolutely certain that as the new facilities come on line and the new programs are in full development the growth is going to accelerate,” Harris said.

The goal for student enrollment is 8,000 and ASU “has a real interest” in attracting the region’s best and brightest, according to Harris.

Next year the students will have a library that is 50 percent larger than the older building, which was gutted. The $20 million renovation to the Levi Watkins Learning Center will add about 45,000 square feet, which includes an Internet café.

A massive two-story, 80,000-square-foot Student Services Center is being built in the exact middle of the campus. The $25 million, state-of-the-art facility, scheduled to open in January 2012, will “have almost everything a student could want,” Harris said. “You can pay your bills there; check on your financial aid, watch a movie; there are banquet rooms – it’s going to be a little palace when it comes on line.”

Other features include a cyber café, post office, bookstore, computer lab, food court and movie theater as well as suites for student government leaders and sororities and fraternities.

While the library is being torn down and rebuilt and Student Services Center is springing out of the ground, construction has also begun on a new $15 million suite-style student housing facility – two, 80,000-square-foot buildings that will hold 500 students. There will be three options for housing – single, two people and four people sharing a suite.

A big-time football complex is under construction that will include a balcony overlooking the football field. The $6 million project, which replaces temporary trailers that have been used for about 15 years, features coaches’ offices, team rooms, locker room, training room and an academic lab.

“It will be a world of difference,” Harris said about the new football complex. The enhanced quality is going to help us considerably in recruiting when we bring parents and students to the university. They are going to see a different place.”

Speaking of the football complex, Harris vows the university will build an on-campus football stadium that will seat around 30,000. It’s a promise. The funding isn’t there yet, but it will be, and there is a site, Harris said. The Hornets currently play their home games at Cramton Bowl.

“A stadium ought to be used more than six days a year,” he said. “I can see a stadium with a fantastic restaurant that would be easily accessible to all the people at Jackson Hospital and all the people in the surrounding area.”

On a much smaller scale, the university will have a new baseball park complete with press box, restrooms and concession stands.
There will a new women’s softball field, a soccer field plus a field for intramural sports.

On another side of the campus, the university is working on what Harris called a “historic district” that features restored homes of Nat King Cole and the Rev. Ralph Abernathy. The university was selected two years ago as the preferred site for the Montgomery Interpretative Center of the Selma-to-Montgomery march by the National Parks Service.

Harris hopes to hear an announcement soon and already has a site for the interpretative center – across the street from the homes of Cole and Abernathy, which are still being renovated. He said the university library has a treasure trove of civil rights memorabilia and archives.

Future phases in the transformation include additional student housing facilities, hotel/conference center and a role in developing the Oak Park area. “We want to build housing that interfaces with the community,” Harris said.

There will be new academic buildings and the need is greatest for the College of Business Administration and a classroom building for the College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences, Harris said.

Of course, you cannot change the inside of the university and its buildings without redoing the gateways. “Gateways are extremely important to us as an indicator of our permanence; of our growth and development; and of our pride in whom and where we are,” Harris said.

“When we decided we were going to make this campus a destination place in Montgomery, we needed some way to make sure that we could have a demarcation. People needed to know that ASU is here. For years, when you came across the bridge at I-85 on Hall Street, you were on campus, but nobody knew it. You could go straight through ASU and never know that you had been on the campus.

“We decided we were going to … make it is clear this is ASU and we’re glad you’re here. We’re proud that we’re here so when you come through that gate you’re on the campus. We also had to insist that the gateways are both visually pleasant and something that people can be proud of. ”

All the new programs, buildings, gateways not to mention a parking deck, landscaping and a more pedestrian-friendly campus are all part of Vision 2020 and the university’s transformational plan.

“People who are business folks understand that when you spend hundreds of millions of dollars it has an impact on the community,” Harris said. “The investment that we’re making in the university is an investment in the community.

“What we’re saying to the people of Montgomery is that we live here; this university lives here; and we’re proud of being a part of Montgomery. Everybody who lives here ought to be proud having the university here.

“I told the mayor, ‘Todd (Strange), we need to keep in mind that Montgomery is a capital city and if we’re going to be a capital city, we ought to have everything at the very highest level of expectations.”



Alabama State University’s Transformation

PHASE ONE:
Completion
2012

Cost
$160 million

Highlights
New life sciences, forensics, health sciences and education buildings (complete); new dining hall (complete) new Student Services Center; renovate library; new football complex; baseball, softball soccer and intramural fields; parking projects.



PHASE TWO:

Completion
2020

Cost
$143 million

Highlights
New football stadium; cultural center with Nat King Museum; amphitheater; Acadome parking deck; residential village; work on east-west pedestrian mall; streetscape improvements



PHASE THREE:

Completion
2025

Cost
$66 million

Highlights
New student housing; new academic buildings



PHASE FOUR

Completion
2030

Cost
$128 million

Highlights
Multi-use residential/retail village; student apartments; parking area; new gateway



PHASE FIVE

Completion
2035

Cost
$117 million

Highlights
New hotel and conference center with a parking deck; student apartments

Source: ASU Today Magazine
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Old Posted Nov 26, 2010, 10:38 PM
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That's great news! LONG overdue...
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Old Posted Dec 9, 2010, 10:01 PM
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Here's a Moblile Press-Register interview with ASU president William Harris. He was speaking at the Mobile Sunrise Rotary Club on Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2010. He was talking about the states proration, the on going ASU campus improvements and the new football stadium. This video is posted on AL.com.


Click here for link.

Last edited by Thedarkone1977; Dec 13, 2010 at 3:38 PM.
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Old Posted Dec 16, 2010, 11:19 PM
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Animated Video of ASU's new staduim
From: ASU.edu



I found a Animated Stadium Fly-Over on the ASU website. It gives you a good look at what the new stadium will look like.

I hope the staduim looks better than what it looks like on this video. There are too many steel beems showing and most of the seating appear to be bleachers. I maybe wrong and when it's finished it will look alot better than what's on the video. Take a like and post what you think.


Click here for link.
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Old Posted Dec 18, 2010, 3:25 PM
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Good for ASU, I went to the other "ASU" Albany State University in Georgia. Good to see an HBCU get their fair share of the pie.
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Old Posted Jan 11, 2011, 11:09 PM
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Interpretive center to be built at ASU
By Jill Nolin • Montgomery Advertiser • January 12, 2011



After almost two years of controversy, the National Park Service announced Tuesday that Alabama State University has been named the site of Montgomery's interpretive center -- centers set up for those who travel the civil rights trail to hear the story of the 1965 Voting Rights March in Alabama.

Some historians have said that locating the center at ASU, rather than at other locations that applied for it that had played larger roles in the march, is an affront to history.

Sandra Taylor, superintendent of the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail for NPS, said the decision to locate the center at ASU would actually enable the center to best "tell the story" of the march.

"It is a mile off the trail, but I don't think it's going to affect how the story gets told," Taylor said in a phone interview Tuesday.

The project could cost about $12.6 million, some of which ASU has vowed to help raise.

Not everyone was pleased by the decision.

Former Lowndes County Commissioner Bob Mants, who helped lead the voting rights marchers into Montgomery in 1965, said Tuesday afternoon that the decision to locate the interpretive center at ASU amounts to a "gross distortion of history."

"It's a travesty of justice," said Mants, an activist who joined John Lewis and two other officials in leading the march to Montgomery from Selma. "It should have been at St. Jude because that's where the marchers rested for the night, not at ASU."

Mants, a member of an advisory committee named to recommend interpretive center sites, voted to locate it at St. Jude.

"The process by which the sites in Selma and Lowndes County were selected was different from that used for the one in Montgomery," he said. "I have no doubts that politicians interceded in the last one."

But the decision, right or wrong, finally does allow the project to move forward.

Now that the university knows for sure that it will have the center "we can begin to make more reasonable plans," ASU President William Harris said in a Tuesday phone interview.

Harris said the announcement allows ASU to "crank up our engines."

The interpretive center in Lowndes
County already is open, and the center in Selma is slated to open next month. The goal is to open the Montgomery center by the 50th anniversary of the historic march, which would be in March of 2015. Each center tells a portion of the story.

Although many details about the center are still undecided, Taylor said there is agreement on a few basics terms. ASU will provide the land, some transportation provisions for visitors and personnel for security and programming. A research area and archives also will be available for scholarly study.

The building will be at least 15,000 square feet and will sit on about three acres of land that will be near the Nat King Cole house. It is expected to draw tens of thousands of people each year, with annual attendance expected to exceed the 17,000 threshold attained at the Lowndes County center.

But the ASU/NPS partnership hopes other organizations will join with them in making the center successful, according to Taylor and Janice Franklin, who is ASU's dean of library and learning resources and the director of the National Center for the Study of Civil Rights and African-American Culture.

Both organizations want to work with other groups such as the City of St. Jude and Mt. Zion AME Zion Church, both of which lost their bid for the interpretive site to ASU.

Both those groups apparently intend to develop their own historical attraction.

"We cannot tell the story without involving the entire Montgomery community, because (the history) encompasses many sites in Montgomery," Franklin said during a phone interview Tuesday.

The march was a "God-inspired movement of a people of faith," and "the opportunity to preserve and honor this history" is a sacred trust for ASU, Franklin said.

NPS announced in 2008 that ASU was the preferred site for the center, and an environmental assessment study that named ASU as the top choice was released to the public in June of last year. Tuesday's ceremony was the official announcement of the center site.

While the cost of construction at ASU is estimated to be about $12.6 million, the Mt. Zion AME Zion Church location would have actually cost about $200,000 less. Building at the former Durr Drug site would cost about $15.9 million, compared with $14.8 million at the St. Jude site.

Congress established the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail, which is 54 miles long, in 1996 to commemorate the events, people and route of the 1965 Voting Rights March in Alabama.

NPS also is in the process of developing a radio program and a cell phone tour service, both of which should be available to the public this summer.

"It gives us another way to broaden our audience," Taylor said.

Last edited by Thedarkone1977; Jan 12, 2011 at 3:35 PM.
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Old Posted Jan 14, 2011, 7:57 PM
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Here are some picture I took while on ASU’s campus last weekend.




View of ASU Stadium site from across Interstate 85





ASU Gateway near Interstate 85




Former homes of Ralph D Abernathy and Nat King Cole





John L Buskey Health Sciences Building



Temporary Library and future site of the Montgomery Civil Rights Interpretive Center






ASU Football Complex and Practice Field



















ASU Baseball Field



View from future Football Stadium site



View from Baseball Field Parking Lot





Ralph D. Abernathy Hall Building 2







Ralph D. Abernathy Hall Building 1






Building





Fred Shuttlesworth Dining Hall




Levi Watkins Learning Center




New Student Housing




Student Housing





Dunn-Oliver Acadome
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Old Posted Jan 30, 2011, 1:24 AM
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ASU’s Football Complex

By Lloyd Gallman • Montgomery Advertiser • January 28, 2011

















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ASU’s Football Complex

By Lloyd Gallman • Montgomery Advertiser • January 28, 2011



Really like that honeycomb design on the carpet... nice touch!
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Old Posted Mar 25, 2011, 2:41 PM
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ASU’s playing on their new baseball field for the first time on Saturday March 26, 2011. The Montgomery Advertiser did a video article about it.

ASU keeps moving forward!



ASU baseball to play first game in new complex Saturday
Montgomery Advertiser • March 25, 2011





Click here for link.

Last edited by Thedarkone1977; Mar 28, 2011 at 8:14 PM.
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Old Posted Mar 25, 2011, 2:55 PM
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ASU’s playing on their new baseball field for the first time on Saturday November 25, 2011. The Montgomery Advertiser did a video article about it.


Umm, make that Tomorrow, Saturday March 26, 2011 at 1pm...

http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com
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Old Posted Mar 25, 2011, 4:15 PM
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Umm, make that Tomorrow, Saturday March 26, 2011 at 1pm...

http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com
Thanks Bystander1. Copy and Paste will be the death of me.
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  #20  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2011, 4:24 PM
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Thedarkone1977 Thedarkone1977 is offline
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WSFA's video is alot better.


ASU Baseball set for return to campus
WSFA • March 24, 2011





Click here for link.

Last edited by Thedarkone1977; Mar 28, 2011 at 8:13 PM.
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