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  #21  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2016, 5:29 PM
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Tottally forgot about Las Colinas! Despite having been there multiple times lol. Really shows how forgettable they are I guess. The infrastructure of them is quite nice but there's nothing else to them, just a bunch of offices really.



Some more pics http://flickrhivemind.net/Tags/canal...ay/Interesting
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  #22  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2016, 7:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toddguy View Post
They might not technically be canals, but they are close enough that they might satisfy the criteria for what the OP is looking for.
I pointed it out for that very reason. If you're looking for something similar to Amsterdam, where you have canals and actual boat traffic, you're not going to see it on any mill races. Development along artificial streams of water is different.
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  #23  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2016, 8:30 PM
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How about Richmond, Virginia:





And it's not exactly a canal (not passable by boat traffic), but Cheonggyecheon in Seoul is one of the greatest urban spaces I've ever seen.
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  #24  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2016, 8:34 PM
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I've always thought that what was done to the Chicago River is perhaps the best analogy to the way the Dutch re-engineered the namesake rivers in cities like Amsterdam and Rotterdam. The dredging out of the Chicago river, the creation of the Chicago-and-Illinois Shipping Canal, and the reversal of the flow of the river is very much like what was done to the Amstel and Rotte rivers (though these rivers were simply re-routed around their respective cities as opposed to reversing their flow). This may be similar to what Steely Dan is also describing with the Milwaukee Rivers as well (and maybe also the Calumet?).

These rivers were all transformed not only for the purposes of shipping and commerce, but also (and perhaps more importantly) for the purpose of good urban water management - ensuring that both storm surges, as well as everyday dirty urban runoff, don't compromise the city's structures or its water supply.
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  #25  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2016, 8:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
I pointed it out for that very reason. If you're looking for something similar to Amsterdam, where you have canals and actual boat traffic, you're not going to see it on any mill races. Development along artificial streams of water is different.
Well the OP never really mentioned boats, so I don't know iif the presence of them would be extremely important.

Lowell:


https://www.google.com/search?q=lawr...Xoy9pBVWtAM%3A




https://www.google.com/search?q=lawr...l764m0RPIaM%3A

And Lawrence:




[IMG]
https://www.google.com/search?q=lawr...XRTq3B6n29M%3A
Seem to have the basic urban density and form to work with along with the millraces/canals.

Most of what is picture in this thread is not really 'navigable' at all-or at least not for any real distance. For just navigable canals that actually connect to larger body of water of the sea, Cape Coral wins...


https://www.google.com/search?q=Cape...cXmQNaL2ARM%3A

...and I am also not so sure this is what the OP had in mind either?

Last edited by toddguy; Jul 26, 2016 at 9:11 PM.
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  #26  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2016, 4:03 AM
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Pueblo, Colorado has one. They call it a riverwalk, but it's a canal. The actual Arkansas River lies two to three blocks to the south.


http://guide.denverpost.com/
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  #27  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2016, 2:28 AM
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Chesapeake & Ohio Canal: Georgetown, Washington DC











Image Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
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  #28  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2016, 2:20 PM
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^ that's so cool!

btw, what's with the horse drawn barge and people in historical costumes in the pics above? is that a local historical society doing some kind of a reenactment, or are hipsters starting to kick it super old school in DC? "fixies are yesterday's trend, horse drawn barge is where it's at!"
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Last edited by Steely Dan; Aug 8, 2016 at 5:50 PM.
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  #29  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2016, 5:46 PM
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Big Spring Park, Huntsville, Alabama

Downtown Huntsville (in fact much of North Alabama) is riddled with caves, so much so that most tall buildings actually have columns constructed in the caves to support the weight of the buildings above. This spring is part of the karst system in downtown, and was originally simply used as a water source but later fed a canal that stretched from downtown Huntsville to the Tennessee River to transport cotton from the mills to the river for transport.

Of course, no one uses the spring/canal for boats anymore, it's just the centerpiece of the Rocket City's 'central' park.


Source: City-Data.com


Source: ihearthsv.com


Source: mapio.com


Source: Huntsville-Homes.com


Source: flwfishing.com


Source: pinterest


Source: alabamapioneers.com


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Source: AL.com


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  #30  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2016, 8:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
...what's with the horse drawn barge and people in historical costumes in the pics above? is that a local historical society doing some kind of a reenactment...
The canal is owned and operated by the National Parks Service, which still maintains parts of it for public recreational use. Most of the canal remains much as it did 100+ years ago, including multiple locks that are still in operation.
The untouched nature of this canal really appeals to me, especially that old tow path! I'm glad it's largely free of modern intervention.

Here are a few photos that illustrate this point rather well - recognize that bridge? How about the boat?





Image Source

Last edited by RobEss; Aug 8, 2016 at 8:45 PM.
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  #31  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2016, 10:46 PM
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Carroll Creek Park: Frederick, MD











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  #32  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2016, 5:21 PM
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All of these canals are making me jealous and Columbus needs one ASAP lol. I have no idea of where they would put one though.
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  #33  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2016, 12:57 AM
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The Woodlands, Texas
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  #34  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2016, 5:54 PM
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Having just been to Amsterdam, this topic is still pretty fascinating to me. It seems there are some fairly major distinctions between the canals shown here - fresh vs. salt water, locks vs. no locks (elevation changes and waterfalls like shown in the mill race photos), decorative vs. functional, etc.

I noticed a few years ago that Louisiana follows many of the same topographic and land-settlement patterns as the Netherlands, and have wondered why they haven't taken the same approach to water management as the Dutch. This is one place in the USA where I could imagine urban canals forming that would be literally analogous to Dutch canals.

Since everything in the Netherlands is essentially flat, the dykes and canals behave almost like Beaver dams and ponds. Take this early image of Amsterdam, where the "dam" is clearly visible in the center of town (which grew up along the banks of the river Amstel), causing the water to re-route around the town and keep it dry.


As time went on, this system of canals was expanded and fortified with an expansive lock-and-dam system, helping keep salty ocean water out of the fresh water canals (very different from canals in a place like Miami or Venice, CA).

A pattern of land development similar to a pre-dammed Amstel can be seen throughout Louisiana (ironically though, not so much in New Orleans since the Mississippi is the "mother" river and not a small distributary). Take the area around Larose, for example, where an artificial shipping canal intersects a natural bayou right in the center of town. In a state where swampland is being rapidly swallowed up by saltwater, making the potential for storm surges like those seen during Katrina even worse and exacerbated by salt-water canals like this shipping canal; it seems like this would be the ideal place to build a Dutch-style system, not for aesthetics or to please urbanists like us, but for an actual practical purpose. I can picture a dam in the very center of towns like Larose, with new canals dug around the edge of town like a moat to convey the water (of course the bayou couldn't be stagnant under this scenario, and more locks, dams, and levees/dykes would likely be needed to reinforce the system).

I'm no civil engineer, and I would be interested to hear if anybody with this kind of expertise agrees with me. I do know, at least, that stagnation of bayous like Bayou Lafourche is a known issue that the Army Corps is beginning to work on. Louisiana is also unique in that the landscape is largely still wild swampland, as opposed to reclaimed farmland, and these swamps need fresh-water floods and their associated silt deposits to stay healthy. Maybe the Dutch system of canals to keep low-lying settlements dry is simply overly-complicated and not needed with today's technology? Or maybe it could be adapted for environmental purposes to channel more Mississippi river water into the swamps in addition to protecting urban settlements? It certainly is fun to think about!

Last edited by mr1138; Sep 14, 2016 at 6:07 PM.
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  #35  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2016, 2:09 AM
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I didn't see anyone mention the Naples canals in Long Beach, CA.
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  #36  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2016, 4:35 AM
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Providence, RI has a good riverwalk that nobody's mentioned yet.


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  #37  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2016, 9:05 PM
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Rideau Canal in Ottawa. Sorry, I'm not able to post pictures.
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  #38  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2016, 9:22 PM
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Here are some pics from the Venice Canals in Los Angeles (Venice Beach). I LOVE this area. Its amazing. If i had an extra 4 or 5 mil, i would buy a house here immediately.









And here are a couple from Long Beach, CA (Naples area)



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  #39  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2016, 10:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LosAngelesSportsFan View Post
Here are some pics from the Venice Canals in Los Angeles (Venice Beach). I LOVE this area. Its amazing. If i had an extra 4 or 5 mil, i would buy a house here immediately.









And here are a couple from Long Beach, CA (Naples area)



Same. Hank Moody (if you're familiar with the show) had quite the life living there.
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  #40  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2016, 11:10 PM
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The Rideau Canal, Ottawa in winter, the oldest fully operational canal in North America and almost entirely operating with 1820s technology.

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